Matt's Reviews > The Age of Reason

The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine
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Feb 12, 12

bookshelves: checked-out-from-the-library, read-in-2012
Read from February 09 to 12, 2012

I checked out the ebook version of The Age Of Reason from my local library and it was riddled through and through with grammatical and spelling errors, which created some frustration while reading. However, the premise was sound enough for me to enjoy reading Mr. Paine's thoughts on the validity of the Old and New Testaments in the Bible. I share many of Paine's opinions about the Bible, such as that of the Bible disproving itself via contradictions strewn throughout the books that comprise the whole "Word of God". It is impossible to validate and consider these works as authoritative and as true accounts of "revelations" presented unto the authors of each book in the Bible. Personally, I feel the Bible is simply a work of fiction. A work so fantastic that it is beyond belief. A conglomeration of anonymous pieces of hearsay with aims to instruct the weak-minded of how to live a "Christian" life. The Bible serves only to cloud the weak-minded population's own judgement and gives them a story to exploit their desire for their own lives having some sort of higher meaning and purpose. Not to mention, the whole of religion preys on the greed of its followers who hope to live their lives in such a way that they are rewarded for doing so at the end.

It is just too difficult to believe and follow a piece of work that is impossible to consider as truth, for me at least. And Thomas Paine, in The Age Of Reason, goes through the majority of the Old and New Testaments and points out what he believed proved that the Bible should not be considered authentic as the "Word of God" and I wholeheartedly agree with him.
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Reading Progress

02/09/2012
25.0%

Comments (showing 1-2)




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message 2: by Sara (new)

Sara A great review, I keep meaning to read it and haven't. I am inspired to pick this up, Matt. People rather reject facts, and refuse to analyze this idea, than take an honest look at the bible.


Matt Sara wrote: "A great review, I keep meaning to read it and haven't. I am inspired to pick this up, Matt. People rather reject facts, and refuse to analyze this idea, than take an honest look at the bible."

Thanks, Sara. Hopefully a paperback version will be edited a bit better than this ebook version I had checked out from the library.

People do rejects facts, especially when the facts contradict that person's opinions / hopes. A rational person would be open minded enough to weigh new information provided to them against their current knowledge and adjust their opinions based on the outcome. But Christians, it seems this is generally frowned upon and they either believe in the story of Christ and denounce anything contradictory, or they simply ignore anything that can even remotely disprove what they believe to be true.

Paine does a fine job of working through many of the books in the Bible to try and show that the people thought to have authored them, most likely did not author them. What problem this brings up, is that of whether or not to believe a piece of work that may have been written by anyone, but claimed to have been penned by some biblical character, such as Moses. To me, that just screams "FAKE!" or at the very least, not at all authoritative.


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