Nataliya's Reviews > The Left Hand of Darkness

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
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Dec 20, 14

it was amazing
bookshelves: hugo-nebula, 2012-reads, excellent-reads, favorites, ursula-k-le-guin, location-is-the-true-protagonist, 2013-reads
Recommended to Nataliya by: Tracy
Read from April 13 to 15, 2012 — I own a copy, read count: 1

The question that permeates Le Guin's 1969 sensational for its time novel about the ambisexual society is what remains once the male and the female labels are stripped away? What is underneath the labels - is it simply humanity?


'Androgynous' - Which is how I could not help but picture the Gethenians.
"A man wants his virility regarded, a woman wants her femininity appreciated, however indirect and subtle the indications of regard and appreciation. On Winter they will not exist. One is respected and judged only as a human being. It is an appalling experience."
Like some readers, Genly Ai, the protagonist of this brilliantly written leisurely-paced cerebral sci-fi classic, for a while just cannot seem to move past the ambisexuality aspect. Ai is an ambassador to the planet Gethen to convince its leaders to join the interplanetary union Ekumen. The inhabitants of Gethen differ from other humanoid races in two aspects: (1) they have adapted well to tolerate the Ice Age climate of their world, and (2) they are ambisexual. For the majority of lunar cycle they are essentially neuter, and for several days they enter a sexual phase, kemmer, during which they attain either male or female characteristics and become capable of sex.
"What is a friend, in a world where any friend may be a lover at a new phase of the moon? Not I, locked in my virility: no friend to Therem Harth, or any other of his race. Neither man nor woman, neither and both, cyclic, lunar, metamorphosing under the hand's touch, changelings in the human cradle, they were no flesh of mine, no friends; no love between us."

The landscapes of Gethen. Minus the Star Wars thingies.

Ai, a male proud of his virility, does not feel comfortable among the Gethians. He is always suspicious, always mistrusting of these people whose essence he refuses to understand. He views himself as "a stallion in harness with a mule", chuckles at the idea of a pregnant King. He tries to view the Gethenians as male, and is appalled at all the femininity that he sees in them, feeling that it is wrong, inferior, alien to him. In the world of wholeness, not of duality, he feels lost and isolated without the familiar stark division that rules our lives. After all, the first question that people immediately ask at birth is - boy or girl? Man or woman?
[Sidenote: Remember the whole relatively recent conundrum about Canadian parents who decided to raise their child without telling the society the child's gender? They received death threats for that attempt, so ingrained is the gender division among us].
Ai is not a bad guy. He is just lost, confused, and isolated - a human, in the other words. He is so out of his comfort zone he does not comprehend how to deal with the society that he views as passive, where there is less competitiveness, and where crying is perfectly fine. He finds it so hard to accept this world without the quientesential 'maleness' or 'femininity' - even though he struggles to define exactly what it is that separates men from women.

Ai becomes so terribly isolated in his alienness, longing for something familiar. In this strange and unfamiliar world of wholeness, he clings to the eternal human "Us vs. Them" divide, refusing in his loneliness and fear to look beyond the usual, the prejudice. Until circumstances force him to get to know Estraven, and Ai finally sees in him "not a man's face and not a woman's, a human face."
"A profound love between two people involves, after all, the power and chance of doing profound hurt."
But it's really Therem Harth Estraven, who, in my opinion, is the true hero of this story. Estraven sees the promise that the union with Ekumen has for his world. In his attempts to help Ai, he becomes viewed as a traitor (view spoiler). But it takes a long time and many trials and tribulations for Ai to recognize Estraven for what and who he is - just HUMAN, to move past the uncomfortable and the prejudice and discover simple human love.
"It is yin and yang. Light is the left hand of darkness... how did it go? Light, dark. Fear, courage. Cold, warmth. Female, male. It is yourself, Therem. Both and one. A shadow on snow."
The language of this book was initially a stumbling block for me. It was dry and very cerebral, making it difficult at first to become immersed in the story. But that was the language of Genly Ai, the man who was not meant to be likeable at the very start. But then I got to the first interlude - short and very poetic legends of Gethen which help shed light on the nature of this world and help us see the events of this story in a different context and different light. The beauty that Le Guin's language reaches during these interludes is breathtaking. The segments of the story written in Estraven's voice are also very distinct, very urgent, simple, and filled with so much dignity and quiet resolve that it made my heart leap and weep at the same time.
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The Left Hand of Darkness is a deep story of humanity, love, betrayal, alienation, and acceptance. But it is not an easy book to read. It is not meant to take you on an exciting whirlwind ride. Instead its aim is to make the readers think and reflect. It may be slow to start, but it's hard to put down as well. I walked away from it feeling that a part of me has been changed forever - and for the better.

I walked away from it with more questions than I had when I started - and that's a very good thing, as far as I am concerned.
"And I saw then again, and for good, what I had always been afraid to see, and had pretended not to see in him: that he was a woman as well as a man. Any need to explain the sources of that fear vanished with the fear; what I was left with was, at last, acceptance of him as he was."
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Quotes Nataliya Liked

Ursula K. Le Guin
“It is a terrible thing, this kindess that human beings do not lose. Terrible, because when we are finally naked in the dark and cold, it is all we have. We who are so rich, so full of strength, we end up with that small change. We have nothing else to give. ”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

Ursula K. Le Guin
“The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty: not knowing what comes next.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness


Reading Progress

04/14/2012 page 72
24.0% "The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty: not knowing what comes next." 2 comments
04/14/2012 page 129
42.0% ""They are the same," said Stokven, and laying his palm against Estraven's showed it was so: their hands were the same in length and form, finger by finger, matching like the two hands of one man laid palm to palm. IDENTICAL HAND TWINS!

"
04/15/2012 page 200
66.0% "It is a terrible thing, this kindness that human beings do not lose. Terrible, because when we are finally naked in the dark and cold, it is all we have. We who are so rich, so full of strength, we end up with that small change. We have nothing else to give."
04/15/2012 page 284
93.0% "Estraveeeeeeeeeeeen!!!!!!!!!
"A profound love between two people involves, after all, the power and chance of doing profound hurt."" 1 comment
04/28/2013 page 200
65.0% "Le Guin fans - and those who have not read this amazing book yet - I encourage you to pop in the discussion of TLHoD Miévillians group is currently holding here: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_..."
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Comments (showing 1-50 of 75) (75 new)


Catie Yes! More Ursula!


Nataliya I heard so much about this book. And I adore the cover :) I wonder if I'm going to experience post-Mieville "big dictionary words" withdrawal?


Catie My Mieville reviews are always chock full o' SAT words. I think Le Guin can hold her own though. This book is excellent.


J.P. "Chock full o' SAT words" LOL. You got that right. The only author I read with a dictionary within reach


message 5: by Traveller (last edited Apr 17, 2012 01:50AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Traveller I hadn't known about this: "[Sidenote: Remember the whole relatively recent conundrum about Canadian parents who decided to raise their child without telling the society the child's gender? They received death threats for that attempt, so ingrained is the gender division among us]."

..but, anyway, I find it shocking. (The death threats, that is.)

I find the backlash to their decision repugnant beyond belief...as if it is what sits in the pants that makes the person... ugh.


Richard Reviles Censorship Always in All Ways I walked away from it feeling that a part of me has been changed forever - and for the better.

I have never fallen in love with someone who has not loved this book. It is, I suppose, a sneaky and evil thing to give an innocent man a book and casually say, "you might like this, sweetie," and leave him in the dark about the gravity of his situation.

But it's been an excellent predictor of future compatibility so far....


Catie Oh, such a beautiful review Nataliya. I think you actually made me understand this book much more than I had before.


Nataliya Traveller wrote: "I hadn't known about this: "[Sidenote: Remember the whole relatively recent conundrum about Canadian parents who decided to raise their child without telling the society the child's gender? They re..."

Here is one of the articles about this baby. I've read quite a few last year when the controversy began. Those who did not send the death threats were still questioning the parents' ability to raise this child, with the common "pressing" concern being - which bathroom will this child use once he/she starts school??? (The kid was about four months old at the time). Will he be like his older brother - wearing braids and liking the color pink??? What would happen to the world then??? And some more death threats would follow. Yeah.


Nataliya Richard wrote: "I walked away from it feeling that a part of me has been changed forever - and for the better.

I have never fallen in love with someone who has not loved this book. It is, I suppose, a sneaky and ..."


Richard, that's a sneaky and evil thing indeed ;) But if it works as a litmus test for relationships, it's awesome! I think the attitude towards the issues raised by this book is indeed a great predictor of someone's personality.


Nataliya Catie wrote: "Oh, such a beautiful review Nataliya. I think you actually made me understand this book much more than I had before."

Thanks, Catie!


Robert Interestingly, I did not find this book difficult to read and it did take me on an exciting whirlwind ride...


Nataliya Robert wrote: "Interestingly, I did not find this book difficult to read and it did take me on an exciting whirlwind ride..."

That's awesome :) I guess I tend to associate exciting whirlwind rides with lighter books, and this one was not exactly that for me. The ride it took me on was still unforgettable, though.


message 13: by Lyndz (new)

Lyndz Nice review, this might be one book I will have to look into.
I loved the Star Wars Walkers pictures, Plus a David Bowie from labyrinth photo. Win.


Robert Nataliya wrote: "Robert wrote: "Interestingly, I did not find this book difficult to read and it did take me on an exciting whirlwind ride..."

That's awesome :) I guess I tend to associate exciting whirlwind rides..."


At her best LeGuin can provide gripping narrative with much thought provoking subtext...for me, this is one of her top-notch books that combines those things.


Sarah I'm glad you liked it! And it looks like you had the same experience I did, finding it dry and cerebral at first, before the language sneaks up on you.


message 16: by Traveller (last edited Apr 18, 2012 12:32AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Traveller Nataliya wrote: "Here is one of the articles about this baby. I've read quite a few last year when the controversy began. Those who did not send the death threats were still questioning the parents' ability to raise this child, with the common "pressing" concern being - which bathroom will this child use once he/she starts school???."

Just read it, and I am deeply saddened at the biased reporting represented in that article. I am also reminded of my mother's constant and anxious attempts at trying to turn me into a "lady" when I preferred to run around like a hooligan with the boys and play cops and robbers along with the rest of them.

I think eventually she kind of gave up. I was one of the best tree climbers around and even an excellent roof climber, ha! The best kind of 'robber' you could think off... :D

I think I kind of limited myself, though, which was probably a good thing. I never acted full-out like a boy; even when my parents weren't around - for instance, I never wrestled or got into fist fights or anything like that. (Still hate sports like boxing and wrestling and rugby to this day - though I do love fencing)
I still liked playing with dolls and wearing pretty dresses as well. I even made clothes for my dolls, along with playing with my older brother's meccano sets and building myself aeroplanes and bridges. I also loved my art and piano, and I adored Ballet, going to the ballet, doing it myself, the music, the costumes, everything, and I dreamed of being a ballerina. (A ballerina who was also a fighter pilot. XD )

So I claimed the full world for myself as much as possible, the full scope that should be available to ALL children/humans - not just half a world as assigned to each gender.

And anybody who has both a boy and a girl like I have, will immediately see the utter fallacy in these assessments:
LaFrance cites studies that have found boy babies tend to be more "inconsolable" than girls, so they get a different type of nurturing that implies "big boys don't cry." Girls also tend to be held more, she adds. Other studies have shown that when people observe a crying baby and are told it is a girl, the child is labeled "sad." When told the baby is a boy, however, observers find the baby "angry."

My little boy (born first) came a bit early and was sweet and tiny and I had such incredibly tender feelings towards him. My daughter was born huge and feisty and ebullient, and it was actually harder to feel tenderness in that same way, because she simply was bigger and more robust. So maybe it is true that we simply feel slightly more protective towards anyone smaller and seemingly less able to protect themselves?

..and I never put any gender pressure on my son, and when he went through a phase of wanting to put on girly clothes, I was afraid for his sake, I'll admit, because I know what society is like, but it passed, and he now fits into exactly the little square society wants him to. I guess attending creche/school pushed him into the "correct???" role.

And I've stopped trying to gender mold my daughter as well. She will be who she is. And play with whatever toys she wants to and whatever games she wants to. Even if they are boys games or "male" toys or "male" books. Which is enjoyed by more girls than you'd like to know, even secretly, if they're not 'officially' allowed to.

How ridiculous that you're not "allowed" things because of your gender. Native American braves and Hun fighters and fierce Norse Vikings wear/wore braids, but a little Canadian boy is not allowed to in the year 2011? Shows you how far backwards we've gone...

PS, and my babies never cried much - neither the boy or the girl, and neither of them were ever inconsolable. Crying usually meant diaper needs changing. Just saying.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

Excellent review. I have had this book on my shelf for years. Each year I get a little closer to reading it. I think this will be the year. Many thanks for taking the time to write such a good review.


Nataliya @ Traveller: When I was little, I never was a 'typical' girly girl either. I climbed trees, snuck away to play at the city dump (oh, the germs!), despised dolls, and resented having to help out in the kitchen. But it never was a problem, and my parents could not care less. However, when a male cousin of mine tried playing with a doll as a kid, the doll was quickly and promptly replaced by toy trucks.

It's just much easier for little girls to be tomboyish than it ever is for little boys to exhibit "girly" tendencies. I think it's because traditionally "male" qualities are considered valuable in the society - I'm talking about competitiveness, athleticism, stubbornness, desire to explore, desire to play with machinery, toughness... All of these are valuable/male qualities, and girls are usually not judged too harshly for crossing the traditional gender boundary. However, the society goes all insane the moment boys try to do the same - after all, what is worse than being a "sissy", acting "like a girl"?

It makes me really sad, this double standard that enforces the existing gender divide.


message 19: by Traveller (last edited Apr 18, 2012 01:13PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Traveller ...and yet, when a male embraces his 'feminine' side (being the nurturing, creative, sensitive aspects), he can be a truly great person. In fact my perfect perfect man (who married a professional ballerina - a childhood love of his) was artistic and sensitive as well as athletic. (A medical doctor by profession - I met him when he was doing his internship and we shared a bunch of interests. )Ooh, and he is sooo handsome too!

And he was straight! Which is just such a boon for us girls since many creative, balanced men who can actualize their "feminine side" end up not being available to to us for grabs because of orientation.

So when I see a sensitive, artistic straight man I grab! In this case, I came in second. Sigh. A soapie example of a guy like this is Ridge from the Bold and the Beautiful. What a dreamboat.

Which is why I really hate when people call boys "sissies". Ok, I do sometimes denigrate my son's fears- but in only one instance; he seems to have a strange fear for moths, which can really be irritating at times, since he jumps up and runs away from them.

I suppose I should be understanding, since I despise roaches and go nuts if I see one. :P Still, I'm the silly one there, and I know it.


Nataliya Traveller wrote: "...and yet, when a male embraces his 'feminine' side (being the nurturing, creative, sensitive aspects), he can be a truly great person. In fact my perfect perfect man (who married a professional ..."

Right. That's why I love that my outwardly very traditionally manly man actually is all warm and fuzzy inside - complete with tearing up at sappy movies, a bit of sensitive sentimentality (that beats mine, for sure!), and love for cooking (a traditional 'female' thing). I am glad he is secure in his masculinity and does not feel that he constantly needs to prove it by being "not sissy".


message 21: by Traveller (last edited Apr 19, 2012 03:07AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Traveller I know and love many men who are secure enough in themselves not to care a whit about societies' silly insistence on machismo.

My current partner actually holds some ideas that are a bit too sexist for my liking, and he naturally gravitates towards "manly" things like soccer, football, etc. (and watching it in the pub with buddies - I never EVER thought I'd end up with a man like that *shrug*) He is very athletic too, and almost all he reads about is war and aviation.

BUT I was mainly attracted to him for his strong nurturing instincts (he is excellent with kids) and the shy sensitive aspect to his otherwise "manly" personality.

Something I enjoy is that he loves his pink (really a pink pink) running shorts and other similar pink gear, like T-shirts or swimming caps, and he feels quite secure enough just to laugh at people if they tease him about his pinkness.

Also, he is even more sentimental than I am. I am the one who tends to forget birthdays, Valentine's days, anniversaries ...and hell help me when I do (Which at first, was often).

Also, I am the "tech" in the house. He does some of the more physically "heavy" type of DIY jobs but I end up doing more "techie" stuff like setting up networks, upgrading/building new PC's, setting up new sound systems/TV's etc.

Interestingly it's sort of worked this way in all my relationships, and the guys I've been friends with/ had relationships with have never ever accused me of being "butch" or anything, rather, they actually seemed to like my "traditionally masculine" proclivities. (Perhaps because I tended to look dianty-ish/traditionally female which seems to count a lot for society as well.) Still, I don't see why people feel guys should be the computer nerds - what's so masculine about that in the first place?

I think a lot of the leeway you get also depends on appearances. (And the values of the particular society - for instance NY might be a lot more forgiving than Bible belt American South)

A woman can be big and muscular to a point of acceptance, but she mustn't get too muscular, or you hear protests. However, if she's hot like Lara Croft, men will forgive her almost anything. If you're a man, I think you can get away with being almost anything too, if you can manage to build yourself a set of muscles that makes it look as if you'd be able to shut the mouth of anyone daring to call you a "sissy".

The unfair part is that people can't help how they were born, and a lot of social pain is inflicted on those who don't physically conform to society's ideals... the worst is with short men and tall women. Thin puny men/fat men can still mange to change their body shape, but there's still not a "cure" (I mean that sarcastically/ironically) for shortness or tallness. :(


Tracy I'm so glad you loved this book. I'm still wending my way through Solaris. I have a tendency to start reading too many books and it makes it hard to finish things.


Nataliya Tracy wrote: "I'm so glad you loved this book. I'm still wending my way through Solaris. I have a tendency to start reading too many books and it makes it hard to finish things."

I do the same thing all the time! This one was just so hard to put down that it took precedence over all the other books I was reading at the time.
What do you think about Solaris so far?


Tracy It is very slow moving. But the notion of this vast alien ocean that may or may not be intelligent is definitely compelling. I'm still at the point where Kelvin has sensed a female presence but doesn't know it is his wife.


Nataliya Slow moving like the vast alien ocean? *wink wink*


Tracy Lol. Funny. Exactly like that.


Chueca http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/cu...

I haven't finished her book quite yet but I found your review so lovely. Though you might like this article because it proves Ursula to be even more awesome; revealing some more angles of the badass sci-fi writer that she is.


Nataliya Chueca wrote: "http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/cu...

I haven't finished her book quite yet but I found your review so lovely. Though you might like this article becaus..."


Thanks for the link. The article was very interesting. I'm really disappointed they've whitewashed the Earthsea stories - the fact that the protagonist of the book written several decades ago was non-white was one of my favorite parts. But I would not expect anything else from mainstream media - sadly, they are still stuck in the past, which is so annoying given how much potential the media actually have to influence people.

"When I looked over the script, I realized the producers had no understanding of what the books are about and no interest in finding out. All they intended was to use the name Earthsea, and some of the scenes from the books, in a generic McMagic movie with a meaningless plot based on sex and violence."

"I didn't see why everybody in heroic fantasy had to be white (and why all the leading women had "violet eyes"). It didn't even make sense."

I love Ursula Le Guin. She is awesome, and I respect her.


message 29: by Kim (new) - added it

Kim Your review makes me want to read the book, thanks :)


Nataliya Kim wrote: "Your review makes me want to read the book, thanks :)"

Then the review has served its purpose! It's a great book, and I hope you do read it.


Ceecee Really good review. It made me rethink the way I rated it, since I was stuck with how slow the story went along, and how difficult to get along with Le Guin's language. And yet, looking past all that, this was a very good novel. I'll have to reread this book soon!


Nataliya Ceecee wrote: "Really good review. It made me rethink the way I rated it, since I was stuck with how slow the story went along, and how difficult to get along with Le Guin's language. And yet, looking past all th..."

Thanks, Ceecee. The language of this book is quite difficult to like, I must admit, especially in the first few dozen pages. But the brilliance of this book won me over very quickly.


Ceecee I also really like how Ursula made an androgynous society. Considering the year she wrote this, it must have been radical at the time? Idk...
Le Guin's name is such a big name in sci-fi and fantasy. It makes me curious... I've only read her "The Beginning Place" and this one. I wonder if her Earthsea series are good as well?


Nataliya Ceecee wrote: "I also really like how Ursula made an androgynous society. Considering the year she wrote this, it must have been radical at the time? Idk...
Le Guin's name is such a big name in sci-fi and fantasy..."


To apoint it may seem radical, but then on the other hand - American society, while moving forward on some issues, seems to have made quite a turn to embracing more conservative values on other issues in the last decade or two - the changes that I mostly disagree with, but that's a whole another topic.

I've read the first of the Earthsea books and liked it quite a bit. It's a very different kind of fantasy - very fairy-tale like. I also read The Lathe of Heaven which I liked a lot and The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia which left me speechless with the strength of Le Guin's philosophy.
How is "The Beginning Place"? I'm looking for a new Le Guin to read, so I'll take any recs I can.


message 35: by Katy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy Wow, how did I miss this one when I was going through my le Guin phase in high school? *runs off to find a copy*


Nataliya I don't think I would have appreciated this book half as much had I read it in high school. maybe it's a good thing that you will read it now!


Ceecee It's been a long time since I read 'The Beginning Place', so I don't remember a lot. I remember it being more of a YA book for older teens than a fantasy, it was slow and subtle, I think. You should give it a try, and I would love to know what you think of it. :)


message 38: by Katy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy Nataliya wrote: "I don't think I would have appreciated this book half as much had I read it in high school. maybe it's a good thing that you will read it now!"

Maybe; I read her fantasies and loved them, but wasn't much into sci-fi back then. Do you think it would be best to accumulate the entire series and read it in order, or will this book stand alone?


message 39: by Katy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy Ceecee wrote: "I also really like how Ursula made an androgynous society. Considering the year she wrote this, it must have been radical at the time? Idk...
Le Guin's name is such a big name in sci-fi and fantasy..."


It's been a few *coughdecadescough* since I read these books in high school, but I remember really loving them. I've found many of my favorites have stood the test of time, so I'd say go for it!


Nataliya Katy wrote: "Maybe; I read her fantasies and loved them, but wasn't much into sci-fi back then. Do you think it would be best to accumulate the entire series and read it in order, or will this book stand alone? "

This is the only book of her Hainish cycle that I've read, and I think of it as definitely a standalone book.


message 41: by Katy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy That's good. Of course, if I love it, I'll probably have to track down and acquire the others anyway... LOL


message 42: by Michael Fierce (new)

Michael Fierce Brilliant, Nataliya. I read this book about 20 yrs ago but I was re-imagining the thoughts, feelings, and what I got from it...even so much as thinking the same thing rating wise as a 4 star but that it's too amazing to not be anything but a 5. And I freakin' love that put up Tilda Swinton & David Bowie's pics. Classic! If you couldn't tell by looking at my oldschool pics, David Bowie is one of my greatest heroes!


Nataliya Michael wrote: "Brilliant, Nataliya. I read this book about 20 yrs ago but I was re-imagining the thoughts, feelings, and what I got from it...even so much as thinking the same thing rating wise as a 4 star but th..."

Thanks, Michael. I love my old-school pictures ;) This is really how I imagined the Gethenians.


message 44: by Katy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy Have I ever mentioned that Labyrinth completely changed my mind about David Bowie? Before I saw that movie I was like "ugh, man, that dude is ugly" and then after Labyrinth I was like "Day-um ... was that the same dude?? Hotness!"

Plus my husband is a huge Bowie fan and has all of his albums IIRC. He's so funny - he'll listen to a new album and say "Oh, I hate this!" because Bowie never sticks with a style, but then a few weeks later he'll put it back in and suddenly "Wow, this is amazing!" and then we listen to it over and over and over and over...


message 45: by Michael Fierce (new)

Michael Fierce Nataliya wrote: "Thanks, Michael. I love my old-school pictures ;) This is really how I imagined the Gethenians. "

Well, damn! Your Gethenians are certainly a lot better looking than they wre in my book!

I'm positive that if they ever make a movie version, they for sure better make you the Casting Director!


message 46: by Michael Fierce (last edited Nov 08, 2012 01:00AM) (new)

Michael Fierce Katy wrote: "Have I ever mentioned that Labyrinth completely changed my mind about David Bowie?...plus my husband is a huge Bowie fan and has all of his albums"

You should check out my podcast of Bowie's album, Low. It's called, Low Broken Radio, and it's all cover versions (not something I'm usually into) of Low in the order of the original album of, mainly electronic artists, some of which can only be found on my podcast. It's quite well-known and has been downloaded thousands of times.

http://musicaphenomena.blogspot.com/s...


Nataliya Katy wrote: "Have I ever mentioned that Labyrinth completely changed my mind about David Bowie? Before I saw that movie I was like "ugh, man, that dude is ugly" and then after Labyrinth I was like "Day-um ... ..."

I have to confess that I've never seen Labyrinth. But I used to like Bowie when I was a kid. I also liked Nirvana. Bowie and Nirvana - I was a strange kid.

Michael wrote: "I'm positive that if they ever make a movie version, they for sure better make you the Casting Director! "

I'll happily take the position ;)


Richard Reviles Censorship Always in All Ways Nataliya wrote: "I was a strange kid."

Amusing ironical use of the past tense.


Nataliya Richard wrote: "Nataliya wrote: "I was a strange kid."

Amusing ironical use of the past tense."


Aw, Richard, you see right through me ;) Okay, I admit - I AM a strange kid. So there.


Richard Reviles Censorship Always in All Ways Double and no backs!

Always have been a strange kid. No desire to change now, and not sure I could if I tried.


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