Lauren's Reviews > The Singer of All Songs

The Singer of All Songs by Kate Constable
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
7141908
's review
Jul 15, 14

bookshelves: favorite-fantasy
Recommended to Lauren by: Skye Williams
Read from January 13 to 18, 2012

There seems to be a fad in YA fantasy these past years for magic to involve music and the rescued heroines to be the ones to save the world (unexpectedly, of course). Summarizing it like that makes me think "well, that's not really so new," because it's always the rescued hero(ine) who ends up saving the world, now isn't it? But I swear there's a new popular style thing going on, and The Singer of All Songs lands firmly in it.

It reminds me very strongly of the Pellinor series by Alison Croggon, where Maerad is taken from a distant, secluded place and introduced to the wider world, where it turns out her magical ability isn't as normal as she thought, and she's likely the one meant to save the world from some horrible thing. Calwyn is also taken from a distant, secluded place and introduced to the wider world, where it turns out her magical ability isn't as normal as the thought, and she's likely the one meant to save the world from some horrible thing.

In Tremaris, the world of The Singer of All Songs, the magic is split into types of chantments (note the pun!) that different societies have specialised in for centuries. Calwyn happens to come from the tradition of high-pitched ice chants, but there's also songs of iron, seeming, being, fire, and so on. Calwyn leaves her home when it is threatened by a chanter who has the power of many different kinds of songs, rather than just one - which is the way it usually is. She travels with Darrow, a chanter of iron, who has made it his quest to stop the evil chanter, and who apparently was the one who brought the evil chanter to Antaris in the first place.

Of course, because this is One Of Those Stories, it's obvious that Calwyn has a crush on Darrow and they might could fall in love. The way I see it, he's the first man she's ever met who has the potential to be a romantic interest, so she fixates on him. It's totally awkward and weird, especially because (as near as I could tell), Calwyn is supposed to be about sixteen years old and Darrow is twice her age. Luckily, others join their traveling party and the reader isn't subjected to the weird UST all the time.

Despite the clichés and "haven't I read this before?" feeling of the book, I did like it a lot. Kate Constable seems to have given careful thought to the politics of the different factions as well as the way her type of magic would affect the characters and environment. It's always neat when that happens. Furthermore, the writing itself is engaging and the story never lost my interest.

Though this is the first book in a trilogy, it works as a stand-alone. There's no real threads left hanging at the end to require the reader to continue to the second in the series, but it's set up so that the plot could easily carry into a second book.
1 like · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Singer of All Songs.
sign in »

Reading Progress

01/13/2012 page 46
15.0%
show 7 hidden updates…

No comments have been added yet.