Allegra Young's Reviews > Oryx and Crake

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
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Jun 25, 12

bookshelves: can-lit, canada-reads, own
Read in March, 2012 — I own a copy

I have finished Oryx and Crake. I now realize that this was an utterly silly thing to do. Friends had mentioned to me that they weren't going to read it (or The Year of the Flood) "just yet" as they wanted to keep it for a rainy day. I, friends, could not wait. Now I realize that it's like when you watch a season of Dexter in a few nights and then you're all pumped to watch the next season, live, and it's the biggest bummer. Who wants to wait a week between episodes? I do not want to wait until 2013 for the third book in the Maddaddam series. I don't want to, but I suppose I must. In a recent series of tweets from Peggy Atwood herself, I was told that the third book was going to be about the mysterious Zeb who appeared here and there in The Year of the Flood, but only in Oryx and Crake if you knew that he was behind the scenes, which I did, as I was reading the books out of order.

Okay, I'm getting ahead of myself. Want to know why I was really so disappointed? It's because I didn't do my research (like, at all) and totally thought that In Other Worlds was book three. What a downer when I went to find it at Indigo only to be directed to the non-fiction section. I felt like this.

Now let's talk about Oryx and Crake. The book follows "Snowman/Jimmy" who is a survivor of some great catastrophe (hint: I know what it is because I read The Year of the Flood first) and who seems to be the leader, much to his disappointment, of a human-esque species that have been created and left behind by the mysterious Oryx and Crake; friends of Snowman's who seemed to have not survived the collapse of the world as we know it. Jimmy, as Snowman was known before, feels utterly alone. He cannot survive for long on the one fish per day as provided by the "Crakers", as Jimmy calls them, so he decides to venture away from the water where he has been surviving to the city where the disaster began. As he takes this journey, he seems tormented by his memories of his life before the "waterless flood" and cannot help recounting them and thus revisiting the people and hardships of his past.

I was trying far a long time to figure out why I wasn't connecting with the book as much as I had The Year of the Flood, when I realized that Jimmy's character who breezes in and out of the second book is kind of a jerk. Where I should be feeling my usual connection to the protagonist, I was instead viewing all his actions with a judgemental eye, wondering when or if my favourite characters from The Year of the Flood would appear. Ren doesn't make an appearance though she dates Jimmy for years (no, that wasn't a spoiler), but Amanda does, and she's nowhere near the Amanda we meet in The Year of the Flood. In fact, I wonder if people who had read these books in order had found it difficult to like Amanda as a main character in book two. I hope not.

There was a great deal of Jimmy's past revealed, and many questions I had about how the waterless flood came to be were answered, but I had really wanted to know more about the "present" in the novel. I think that the story of Oryx and Crake only took place in 3 or 4 days in the book and I was so wanting more. In The Year of the Flood there are moments of looking back on one's past, but also a great deal of time passes in the "present" so I felt that I gleaned way more about the Maddaddam (oh wow - only now did I just realize that it was a palindrome) world during that reading.

I was so pleased that both of these books were on the Canada Reads 10th Anniversary longlist or, to be honest, I probably wouldn't have read them. Yes, I had heard that they didn't need to be read in order and I agree. I do really wonder though what it would have been like to read them the other way around. I'll never forget the conversation I had with my mum once about how the human brain can never "unknow" something. When I first saw the movie The Reader, I knew nothing about it. When my mum saw it, she had watched the trailer first where they reveal that Hannah Schmidt, the woman being read to, is a Nazi. Having not known this, I viewed Hannah completely differently than my mum did throughout the film until the truth is revealed about half way through. I never really could understand why they had revealed something like that in the trailer - my mum and I had had completely different viewing experiences. The fact that she knew Schmidt was a Nazi made her think the relationship with the young boy was tainted and creepy where I found it touching and pure. You can't "unknow" something, just like I couldn't forget how Jimmy had treated Ren and this, I think, disconnected me from him. Having said that, maybe there would be a change in the way Amanda was viewed if you read the books in order, or the way the God's Gardeners are alluded to in Oryx and Crake as a crazy cult where as in The Year of the Flood they are ecologically smart and in touch with their world.
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Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

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Matthew I didn't realize this was part of a trilogy. Now I want to read the other two


Allegra Young Apparently there are only 2 so far. I read Year of the Flood first, actually and it didn't make much of a difference. Liked it more than Oryx and Crake!


Kerry I read Year of the Flood first too (accidentally, as I didn't do my research and hadn't realized it was the sequel to Oryx and Crake). Sounds like it only adds to Oryx and Crake, though, instead of spoiling it. I can't decide if I should read Oryx and Crake now or wait until 2013... I hate waiting.


Allegra Young Don't wait! It's so good...


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