Hend's Reviews > Barabbas

Barabbas by Pär Lagerkvist
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Apr 16, 12

bookshelves: novels, nobel-prize-winners, nordic-literature, favorite-novels
Read in April, 2012

The story of Barabbas being unbeliever although he has witnessed the crucifixion eclipse that darkness that accompanied the crucifixion and was supposed to be a miracle and also t he resurrection of Jesus after he had been crucified and buried and his visit to , a man who lived through the resurrection process. All this doesnt prevent him from being a skeptic who cant believe that God could be crucified , and has his own doubts through his journey searching for answers……and peace for his soul and cure for his loneliness that he recognized at the end……in contrary to Sahak who is Faithful Believer and is willing to die for what he believe without witnessing the miracles that Barabbas has , this raise a question ,should faith be taken by mind as Barabbas who suffered the darkness of the soul or by heart like Sahak did and find his own peace… ……

i think Barabbas struggling to believe might have a reflection on Pär life ,his own trial to understand Jesus.......
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04/13/2012 page 28
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04/15/2012 page 110
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message 1: by Salma (new) - added it

Salma في انتظار رأيك
كنت قرأت للمؤلف القزم و أحببتها كثيرا و جدا
و قررت القراءة له ثانية
:)
-


Hend هى عاجبانى لحد دلوقتى يا سلمى
:)
لم اقرا له اى روايات نن قبل


s.penkevich Very insightful points. I like the idea that it may be related to Par's own struggle. Perhaps this novel was himself working out the path of his own faith.

I enjoyed the part about B and Sahkah, do you think this was a reference to organized religion of something of that sort as it showed how one can 'rise from hell' if they join together in their faith? Then again I think the chain was more for how B felt once it was gone, not being attached to anyone. Or maybe both. Layers. This book has so many layers!


message 4: by Hend (last edited Apr 17, 2012 06:22AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hend 'rise from hell' if they join together in their faith? Then again I think the chain was more for how B felt once it was gone, not being attached to anyone. Or maybe both. Layers. This book has so many layers!

yeah i think Par wanted to say that their love has united their path even if they are not having the same degree of faith,or even one is unbeliver as barbbas ,love make them rise from hell ...he wanted to say that religion is all about love and this sentense was siad frequently (to love one another....)
u may understand it as if u accompany atruly faithful
guy who believe in his salvation u might take some of his blessings....


message 5: by Hend (last edited Apr 17, 2012 06:45AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hend the chain was more for how B felt once it was gone, not being attached to anyone. Or maybe both. Layers. This book has so many layers!

u think that after the chain was removed he felt his lonliness and darkness of soul especially in that tomb..(that scene has alot of symbolism)
his friend was his only connection to the life itself...?
the last scene was not clear for me at last he became a believer?

he said he give his soul to death that he always fear...?
didnot say to God...?

another question,did he wanna say that to be abeliever or not it is not something u decide...
sahak has the ability to recieve faith in his heart without any difficulty.. no miracles. while barabbas heart is closed to faith.we have no idea about sahak past life...may be he havent experienced all hatred barabbas has experienced before he was even born that he has inherited his own curse to live a miserable life...

another point
when sahak and barabbas was asked about their faith
sahak admited being a believer and was tortured and crucified .....
barabbas has no faith and escaped death but was it worth it,the life he lived doesnt differ alot from being dead....


s.penkevich Perhaps the lonliness felt after the death of Sahak and the chain was representative not only as a link to a shared faith, but a link to God himself? Sahak was the believer and his belief is what gave Barabbas his strength, so once B was without a believer, he had no connection to God as well as with any other person.

I wasn't sure about the whole being a believer is not something you decide. It seems like you must either believe or not, and that B was possibly could have worked it out, but he does seem to portray him as a 'damned' individual right from the start. Perhaps this is symbolic of original sin though?

Good point about his escaping death being no better than being dead though. It seems he was burdened with guilt while Sahak was set free, and possibly symbolic of the 'denying Jesus' that he was so confused about earlier on.

What was your take on the ending? Initially I thought it was saying that you are forgiven regardless, and that at the end he was finally able to believe and be welcomed, but now I'm not so sure. Or was meant ironically, that he is a sinner, has done nothing good and is unable to believe, and that his final words are more mocking than anything. I wonder if him setting fire to the town was Par's way of saying that some believers cause more harm than good. I need to read more of his works to understand his point of view to fully understand this book. I think I'm going to read The Dwarf soon, which seems to be very nihilistic, and see if that gives me a better grasp on Par's message in Barabbas


Hend wow!
excellent analysis....
i am upset that i didnt find more of his books here in Egypt,it may be enough to read your reviews of them until i can get one of them,,,


s.penkevich Hend wrote: "wow!
excellent analysis....
i am upset that i didnt find more of his books here in Egypt,it may be enough to read your reviews of them until i can get one of them,,,"


Thanks. Everytime I think about this book I have different, and often conflicting, thoughts about the symbolism. And still think many are intended to be taken of mulitple levels. I still haven't decided if this book is hopeful or condemning and bleak though.

I have had a difficult time tracking down his books. I suppose I could order some on Amazon, but I came across this purely by chance and have never found any of his in bookstores (used or new) when actually seeking him out. I guess he is a nearly-forgotten great, which makes me sad that many Nobel winners fade into oblivion.


Hend s.penkevich wrote: "Hend wrote: "wow!
excellent analysis....
i am upset that i didnt find more of his books here in Egypt,it may be enough to read your reviews of them until i can get one of them,,,"

Thanks. Ever..."


yeah i think many noble winners were not appreciated may be beacause their works are complex and have adeep philosophical issues,not every one like these types of books....
but i really liked this one,it raises alot of questions ,after u finish it u feel it adds something to u...


s.penkevich after u finish it u feel it adds something to u...

Very well put! I agree completely. This is one of those books you don't just shake off.


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