Jeanne's Reviews > The Girl Who Was on Fire: Your Favorite Authors on Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games Trilogy

The Girl Who Was on Fire by Leah Wilson
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Dec 13, 2011

it was amazing
bookshelves: dystopia
Read from December 13 to 22, 2011

I very much enjoyed reading this collection of essays about the Hunger Games Trilogy. I give 5 stars to a book that makes me think, and this collection made me re-think my impressions of the trilogy in many different ways. I read the book series as a fan--fast and furious. I was infuriated with the unsatisfying ending of Mockingjay. However, the essays in this collection forced me think more critically about different aspects of the story and caused me to think that I should read them again.

My favorite essays in the collection were Carrie Ryan's about reality television, Terri Clark's about fashion, Blythe Woolston's about PTSD, and Adrienne Kress's on the decline of decadence. (The only one I thought was bad was Cara Lockwood's about science that had both glaring errors in the science and the grammar.) After reading many of these, I also see why so many adults are scared of the political messages in this young adult novel. However, I will say that most of the young adults reading the novel won't at all see the connections being made by the essayists.

I feel that this book would be an outstanding example for high school English classrooms. We teach literary analysis using "classics" like Great Gatsby, Scarlet Letter, or Grapes of Wrath. We read outdated literary analysis from authors and essayists students have never heard of. This collection is about a well-loved contemporary book that is only gaining popularity with the anticipation of the movie release in March 2012. The essays are written by other contemporary young adult authors with whom some of the students may be familiar. And, many of the essays are so well written, drawing on other sources from contemporary culture.
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