Jen's Reviews > The Dickens with Love

The Dickens with Love by Josh Lanyon
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
1719442
's review
Dec 05, 2011

it was ok
bookshelves: christmas, humor, rbrs, smut
Read from November 30 to December 03, 2011

I think I did my part to dilute the importance found in underlining meaningful passages on this kindle edition.

For example, click on "Popular Highlights" for this book on kindle and you will find:

"Bravery isn't the absence of fear, it's how you deal with being afraid."

Well. That's very nice. I'm glad so many other people found this line really meaningful to them. But I can get that kind of encouragement from watching a documentary on Patton or something. It's hardly the kind of life lesson I really believe from a guy that I remember as the jolly old saint condom claus.

Also, other readers found this inspiring:

"God hears all our prayers, but sometimes the answer is no."

I have no idea who these other underliners are, reading this on their kindles, but I've got to say that God here was an interesting topic to bring up between the bedcovers and body souffle.

Here's a sample of what I chose to underline:

(view spoiler)

I think I can share my favorite line without spoiling anything. I mean, this is a romance novel, does anyone not read the book summary and not think about that romance when they read a line like-

...but pride and anger was working me like an intrusive hand up a puppet's sleeve."

Because that imagery is priceless.

Oh, and my underlined encouraging passage? Well, it doesn't mention bravery. But personal pride is also commendable, and I think this line serves as a little self-esteem booster:

"Your arse is delicious in its own right, true enough."
14 likes · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Dickens with Love.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

11/30/2011
4.0%
12/01/2011
32.0% "Many giggles."
12/02/2011
36.0% "looking for a classy gift. Not flavored condoms."

Comments (showing 1-17 of 17) (17 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Sometimes things don't fit. Like the guy on the cover's vest.


Eh?Eh! Hahah! I hope other readers give your highlighted passages as much pondering as you gave theirs.


Miriam I had no idea there was this "popular highlights" function of which you speak! Is it automatic? I mean, do you have a choice about whether your highlights are shared with other readers?


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

I've heard the second one before in a bunch of contexts. It's one of those proverbial things people say.

I do love the idea of a popular highlight.


Miriam Yeah, I think both are basically aphorisms at this point.


message 6: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Miriam wrote: "I had no idea there was this "popular highlights" function of which you speak! Is it automatic? I mean, do you have a choice about whether your highlights are shared with other readers?"

I'm pretty sure that kindle allows you to share or not share your highlights/markings. I don't know how this is tracked, really, although I have seen when I've finished a book "Tweet/share that you've finished this book", etc. Since I do not tweet or have a Facebook account, I cannot confirm any of this. But as you read a book on kindle, you'll be able to see popular highlights (broken underlinings like this _ _ _ _) from others.

This book had more popular highlights- I just didn't list them all. Another of them was "Dickens wrote it himself: 'The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you.'" Which is actually a line I found pretty funny myself, considering this book.


message 7: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Elizabeth wrote: "Are you sure the lines underlined by the others weren't because they'd heard them before and wanted to double check they hadn't been plagerized?"

Perhaps the other readers were worried about plagiarism. But these lines have been unattributed and trotted out so much on greeting cards, posters, country songs, etc. that it kind of makes me wonder how these readers ever wondered over the author being the originator of the lines in the first place.


Caris I was really surprised at the number of highlighters. Is there some compulsion to highlight what others have? Is it like dogs pissing on the same quote?

I hate the popular highlights function. It's like you bought your ebook used from the stupidest person on the planet.


message 9: by Jen (last edited Dec 07, 2011 05:30AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Now those are comments I'd like to highlight. Everyone, gather round and deplete your highlighting fluids here.

"Is there some compulsion to highlight what others have? Is it like dogs pissing on the same quote?"

"I hate the popular highlights function. It's like you bought your ebook used from the stupidest person on the planet."


Miriam I don't usually mark up books, but when reading things for class that I didn't plan to keep there was always a temptation to underline meaningless bits for the next person.


message 11: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Miriam, I like your random act of chaos.


Miriam When reading used books I sometimes feel like that's what the previous owner did...


message 13: by Jen (last edited Dec 07, 2011 09:17AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Perhaps you're reading a used book from me??


Miriam That would be funny.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Miriam wrote: "I don't usually mark up books, but when reading things for class that I didn't plan to keep there was always a temptation to underline meaningless bits for the next person."

I have this feeling whenever I read books I previously read for class. I am an inscrutable underliner, even to myself. This is worrisome.


message 16: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen But do you underline greeting cards?




message 17: by mark (new) - rated it 3 stars

mark monday work that forge, work it!


back to top