Alyson's Reviews > I'll Find You

I'll Find You by Clair M. Poulson
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
752985
's review
Nov 28, 2011

it was ok
bookshelves: 2011, book-club, lds, fiction
Recommended to Alyson by: Andrea Day
Recommended for: pretty much no one
Read from November 25 to 28, 2011

This novel is infuriating. The plotting is okay, I guess, if you don't mind chains of events that are too unbelievable to ever happen that way. The editing is terrible—over and over again there are sentences that someone should have caught, such as: "Would you be agreeable to signing an agreement?"

But this author cannot write women. The protagonist is a female who, every time she is on the page in a scene, dissolves into tears. There is no event or situation that does not create a waterfall cascade and necessitate a bunch of eyedrops and enhanced makeup. And she escalates into anger and yells, a lot. I am so sick of her overwrought emotions I'd strangle her myself if she hadn't gotten herself mixed up with the wrong company. I should be worried about her, but I'm rubbing my hands wondering what they'll do to her.

EDIT (now that I've finished the book)

Sigh.

All ended well, I guess. Lots more tears. Everybody cries and uses eyedrops. It is books like this that make me absolutely despair about LDS fiction—the writing is only average (at best), the editing below average, the story and plotline so cliched it's unjust.

Sigh.
1 like · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read I'll Find You.
Sign In »

Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Is it LDS fiction in the sense that the characters are part of the LDS community and the events unfold within the LDS community, and the LDS faith and community are an important part of the book, or is it just that the author is LDS?


message 2: by Alyson (last edited Nov 29, 2011 11:57AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Alyson There are things that are the second, Twilight for example. But no, this is "real" LDS fiction, which almost always includes a conversion story—someone who finds/needs the gospel and is brought into the church. Their conversion journey is part of the romance/suspense/mystery/character development plot arc. So these books include lots of LDS terminology and esoterica, and mostly assume a familiarity with the faith and community. None of them that I've encountered are well-written enough in any way to appeal to any audience other than LDS readers (unlike good Christian fiction, which applies to many denominations of Christians, or might even [possibly?] appeal to non-Christians if written well enough).


message 3: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Alyson wrote: "There are things that are the second, Twilight for example.

I'd forgotten that!

Christian fiction can appeal to non-Christians if written well enough, but I have never encountered a Christian story that was both overt enough in its portrayal of faith and the power of God to satisfy what I assume is the average reader of Christian fiction, and interesting enough in other ways to satisfy a secular reader. Not that I've read a lot of Christian fiction, but I've read some. And have always been disappointed that the characters in such stories are so shallow, so one-dimensional, and seem to have nothing going on in their lives apart from the crisis of faith at the centre of the story. I know plenty of Christian people in real life who don't spend every moment of every day fretting about their relationship with their God - they have jobs, friends, families, dentist appointments, social lives that involve people other than those who share their faith, creative outlets, and they have the ordinary concerns that all of us have: food, clothing, shelter, raising children, aging parents, getting the roof repaired, buying gas, making dinner. And yet. :)


Alyson adventurat wrote: "I have never encountered a Christian story that was both overt enough in its portrayal of faith and the power of God to satisfy what I assume is the average reader of Christian fiction, and interesting enough in other ways to satisfy a secular reader."

Amen. This is the state I hope LDS fiction will someday get to. It was what I was clumsily trying for w/ Elizabeth's Story (remember that old thing?) because it was a story with some religion in it, and I wanted it to have that little bit of faith and power and moral quandary/decision, but still be interesting for people who aren't LDS.


back to top