Richard Derus's Reviews > The Ark

The Ark by Boyd Morrison
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Nov 20, 2011

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Read in July, 2010

Rating: 3.75* of five

Thrillers are, by definition, thrilling, or there's flat no point to 'em. This thriller is certainly thrilling! It's not overly believeable, but neither are most of the others I've read and enjoyed. Somehow thrilling things only seem to happen to people with oodles of money and contacts at VERY high levels and access to private jets and peculiarly uninterested customs and immigration protocols.

Ahhh, so what...the ride's the thing. This ride was a ball. The Ark, as in "Noah's", is the vector for a hideous, all-devouring plague, and the resident Seattle multibillionaire evil SOB has used his money to engineer a superdedooper-a-la-Peter-T-Hooper version of the bug he used the main character's gal-pal's archeologist daddy to find. And the main charactrer, Tyler, finds out about it barely in time to get in on the fun chasing around the globe that stopping the worldwide release of the nasty that Superbaddie Seattle SOB has in mind!

So off we go, around the world on planes that apparently never need to refuel, with pilots who never speak or in one case Tyler piloting the plane...onto the world's largest cruise ship, slated for death and contagion via Arkon-C (the virus's catchy nickname); out to Phoenix to assemble the wreckage of John Travolta's a weird-culty Hollywood star's plane, destroyed after Arkon-C ate everyone on it; over to White Sands, New Mexico, to see a demo of the world's most powerful non-nuclear bomb, which test is overseen by Tyler's conveniently powerful Air Force General daddy; out to the oldest Christian monastery in the world, located in Armenia; thence to Mount Ararat, Turkey, where the Ark is; and then to the Ark itself. Of course, Tyker and his gal-pal save the world, and all returns to normal. The end of the world as we know it ain't thriller-ending material.

Wow! If the Ark is ANYthing like Morrison describes, I wanna go NOW and see it!! Like everything else about the book, the Ark is hugely improbable, but Morrison has lavished so much creative energy on the idea of the Ark that it came vividly alive for me, and represented the best reason I can give you to make you buy and read this book: Morrison's imagination is world-class and deserves our support. I think the fact that he got blurbs from James Rollins, Steve Berry, Douglas Preston, and Gayle Lynds is readily explainable: They know they need to be nice to the next big man on campus so he'll be nice to them later.

A word about how this book came to be: It was a self-published Kindle title, one that was picked up by Simon & Schuster's Touchstone imprint, because it sold quite well in the Kindle-only universe of thrillers that exists. I am seriously contemplating getting a $)(!&*%*^ Kindle so I can read all those trashy boy-meats-boy bromances and otherwise-unavailable thrillers that are out there in abundance.

*sigh* O tempora! O mores! (My favorite misquote from the Latin.) (They didn't use exclams, y'know.)
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message 1: by Stephen (new)

Stephen "The Ark, as in "Noah's", is the vector for a hideous, all-devouring plague, and the resident Seattle multibillionaire evil SOB has used his money to engineer a superdedooper-a-la-Peter-T-Hooper version of the bug he used the main character's gal-pal's archeologist daddy to find."

About as good a one sentence summary as I can Imagine.


Richard Derus I think I'd be good at packing parachutes, too.


message 3: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Brevity is the something of something I once heard.


Richard Derus "Brevity is the soul of lingerie."==Dorothy Parker, the Goddess of My Idolatry


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