Kim's Reviews > Spontaneous Happiness

Spontaneous Happiness by Andrew Weil
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Jan 02, 12

bookshelves: first-reads
Read from December 15, 2011 to January 02, 2012

3.5 stars This was a First Reads giveaway, and also my first experience with Andrew Weil. All throughout the book, I found the title,"Spontaneous Happiness", confusing. The book came across to me more as how to fight depression and work at being happy. He explains the title in this way: "I am asking you to question the prevalent habit of making positive emotions dependent on external agencies and to think of happiness as one of the many moods available to us if we allow for healthy variability of our emotional life." (p9)

The book is divided into 3 parts. The first focuses on depression, and various philosophies of mental health. The second describes how to optimize your emotional well being through caring for your body, your mind, your emotions and your spirituality. The last past ties everything together with an 8 week program, giving specific instructions on what to work on each week. I am going to try the program, and if I can stick with it, I feel that I will benefit from it. It is mostly common sense, but having it in front of you, spelled out step-by-step is a helpful thing.

One of the things I like best about the First Read giveaways, is that I often win books that I would never have picked up on my own. It helps me to expand my reading habits, and every once in a while, I find a true gem. Conversely, I have gotten some really terrible ones that I have struggled to finish. This book lies somewhere in the middle of that spectrum.
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Reading Progress

12/23/2011 page 91
32.0%
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message 1: by Casherie (new) - added it

Casherie Bright I think he means that we should shift our minds from feeling like we have to be constantly happy, and accept the moments when we are truly happy, even if they occur infrequently or spontaneously.


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