Brad's Reviews > Gargantua and Pantagruel

Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais
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Mar 08, 11

bookshelves: novel, sensoria

Utterly unique, completely over-the-top and overflowing with every substance from wine to excrement. The definitive exemplar of the grotesque and the carnivalesque: Gargantua and Pantagruel is the high and holy testament to satiric diatribe, excess verbiage and sensory overload.
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Comments (showing 1-3 of 3) (3 new)

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message 1: by Bennet (new)

Bennet I bought a fine 1928 edition several years back for $2, not sure if I'd read it but just about any fine vintage edition of anything is irresistible at $2. By page 5 I was all in. I can imagine Pynchon as Rabelais reincarnated, but Rabelais is a friendlier read, and so far I like him more.


Brad I like your point about Pynchon as avatar of Rabelais. I've got an old copy of Rabelais too, no year, Bibliophist Society with illustrations by Gustave Doré.


Bennet wrote: "I bought a fine 1928 edition several years back for $2, not sure if I'd read it but just about any fine vintage edition of anything is irresistible at $2. By page 5 I was all in. I can imagine Pync..."


message 3: by Bennet (new)

Bennet Dore illustrations! What a bonus. No illustrations here, but I love the opening line of Donald Douglas's introduction: Rabelais calls spirits from the vasty deep and at his bidding they rise in prodigious bulk from great ocean bottoms or break like monstrous djinns from a cloud-land of huge fancy.


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