Cecily's Reviews > Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
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Apr 15, 2016

it was amazing
bookshelves: scifi-future-speculative-fict, dystopian, american-canadian
Recommended for: People who think sci-fi and literature can't overlap
Read in December, 2015

description
Library as cathedral, as all libraries should be - John Rylands Library, Manchester.
Image source: http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/a...

Read me, love me, touch me, treasure me

This is a book about the power of books that is itself steeped with references, both explicit and indirect, to the great works that permeate our culture so thoroughly that we do not always notice them - until they’re gone. Bradbury shows us the horror of a hedonistic but unhappy world where books and ideas are banned in the futile pursuit of the illusion of happiness. As with A Clockwork Orange (my review), there is a constant tension between the deliciously poetic language and the horrors of the setting.

The intended message of this 62-year-old novel is different: a prescient warning about the addictive power of continuous, passive imbibing from the virtual worlds and interactive screens that are our constant companions. I guess Bradbury was so infused in bookish culture himself that he didn’t realise how loudly the literary message shouts from every page, almost drowning out everything else: read me, love me, touch me, treasure me. Reading is a physical, sensual, transformative relationship, not merely a mental process. See this excellent article (thanks, Apatt!) for Bradbury's views on the persistent misinterpretation of his book: http://www.laweekly.com/news/ray-brad....

Nevertheless, the balance of themes is shifting: smartphones and the Internet of Things mean we’re catching up with Bradbury’s vision. Certainly, I was more aware of his technological warning than on previous readings - but it’s still the insatiable thirst for what is in and from books (ideas, discussion, and knowledge) that stokes my passion for this novel:
“The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us.”

The weak characterisation, cruelly caricatured Mildred, and the rationale and details of the totalitarian state’s oppression, censorship (sadly apt after the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris in January 2015), and warmongering are secondary - just the canvas on which Bradbury delicately paints his nightmare, by moonlight, to the pitter-patter of raindrops and the whisper of falling leaves.

tl;dnr - stick with the four paragraphs, above.


Plot and Narrative Structure

The plot is well-known: It is set in the near future, where all books are banned because they are elitist and hence cause unhappiness and division. Instead, the population is fed continuous inane soap operas to lull their minds into soporific approximation of non-unhappiness. TV really does rot their brains, or at least sap their ability to think for themselves. Firemen no longer put out fires, but instead burn houses where books are found.

Montag is a fireman, so part of the regime. But he is tempted by the unknown promise of what he destroys, takes greater and greater risks, and ends up a fugitive, living rough with other rebels, each of whom has memorised a book so that when things change, they can be rewritten. (Ironically, these people also destroy books - just the physical ones, after they have memorised them.)

There are three parts:

1. “It Was a Pleasure to Burn” shows the restrictions of Montag’s world, and his growing, but unfocused, dissatisfaction with it, contrasted with beautiful imagery of the natural world, especially moonlight and trees - and fire.
2. “The Sieve and the Sand” is about confrontation: with self and others - with truth.
3. Finally, in “Burning Bright”, revelation leads to liberation, danger, and the possibility of freedom. But at what cost?

QUOTES

I had forgotten (or maybe never noticed!) how wonderful the language is. This review is even more focused on quotes than usual, so I never forget.

Contradictions

• "The trees overhead made a great sound of letting down their dry rain.”
• “They walked in the warm-cool blowing night on the silvered pavement.”
• “He felt his body divide itself into a hotness and a coldness, a softness and a hardness, a trembling and a not trembling, the two halves grinding one upon the other.”
• “He was moving from an unreality that was frightening into a reality that was unreal because it was new.”
• “The Mechanical Hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live.”

Mechanical Hound

This thing, this high-tech version of the most atavistic, omnipotent monsters that plague our dreams from infancy, is where Bradbury’s hybrid of beauty and horror reaches its peak:

• “The moonlight… touched here and there on the brass and the copper and the steel of the faintly trembling beast. Light flickered on bits of ruby glass and on sensitive capillary hairs in the nylon-brushed nostrils of the creature that quivered gently, gently, gently, its eight legs spidered under it on rubber-padded paws.”
• “Out of the helicopter glided something that was not machine, not animal, not dead, not alive, glowing with a pale green luminosity.”
• “He could feel the Hound, like autumn, come cold and dry and swift, like a wind that didn't stir grass… The Hound did not touch the world. It carried its silence with it.”

(Moon) Light, Rain, Nature

• “Laughter blew across the moon-colored lawn.”
• “The moonlight distilled in each eye to form a silver cataract.”
• “They read the long afternoon through while the cold November rain fell from the sky in the quiet house. They sat in the hall because the parlour was so empty and gray-looking without its walls lite with orange and yellow confetti.”
• “You could feel the war getting ready in the sky that night. The way the clouds moved aside and came back, and the way the stars looked, a million of them swimming between the clouds… and the feeling that the sky might fall upon the city and turn it to chalk dust, and the moon go up in red fire.”
• “The river was mild and leisurely, going away from the people who ate shadows for breakfast and steam for lunch and vapours for supper.”
• “The more he breathed the land in, the more he was filled up with all the details of the land. He was not empty.”

Burned Books as Once-Living Things

• “The flapping pigeon-winged books died on the porch.”
• “They fell like slaughtered birds and the woman stood below, like a small girl, among the bodies.”
• “The books lay like great mounds of fishes left to dry.”
• “Their covers torn off and spilled out like swan-feathers.”
• “The books leapt and danced like roasted birds, their wings ablaze with red and yellow feathers.”
• “Light the first page, light the second page. Each becomes a black butterfly.”
• “The floor littered with swarms of black moths that had died in a single storm.”

Fire

If BuzzFeed is to believed (a medium-sized "if", imo), its original title was not "Fahrenheit 451", but "The Fireman". He and his publishers thought it a boring title, so they called a local fire station and asked what temperature paper burned at. The firemen put Bradbury on hold while they burned a book, then reported back the temperature, and the rest is history.

• The opening sentence: “It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. with this brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.”
• “The books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.”
• “Those who do not build must burn.” (Do they ignite the fire, or are they consumed by it?)
• “It’s perpetual motion; the thing man wanted to invent but never did.”
• “A bloom of fire, a single wondrous blossom that curled in petals of yellow and blue and orange.”
• A bonfire, “was not burning; it was warming... He hadn’t known fire could look this way. He had never thought… it could give as well as take.”

Dangers of Books

Many of the reasons given could just as easily apply to TV shows; Faber says as much to Montag, “It’s not books you need, it’s some of the things that once were in books” and that those same things could be in the TV shows, but aren’t. Instead, the TV shows are specially designed to numb minds to all except vague pleasure.

• “Books aren’t people… my family [soap stars] is people”.
• “None of these books agree with each other… The people in those books never lived.”
• “It didn’t come from the government down… Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick… Today… you can stay happy all the time” because only comics, confessions and trade journals are permitted.
• “The firemen are rarely necessary. The public stopped reading of its own accord.”
• “We must all be alike. Not everyone was born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal… Then all are happy”, protected from the “rightful dread of being inferior”.
• “Our civilization is so vast that we can’t have our minorities upset and stirred”, so everything that might upset anyone is destroyed.
• Filled with facts, people “feel they’re thinking… they’ll be happy because facts of that sort don’t change.”
• “All the silly things the words mean, all the false promises, and all the second hand notions and time-worn philosophies.”

Dangers of VR

There is bitter irony in a “living room” where the only “living” is that of fictitious people, passively observed on the huge screens on the walls.

• Entering the bedroom “was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set.”
• “Her eyes fixed to the ceiling by invisible threads of steel, immovable. And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound… coming in on the shore of her unsleeping mind. The room was indeed empty.”
• “People don’t talk about anything… They name a lot of cars or clothes or swimming-pools and say how swell.”
• Brainwashing: “It’s always someone else’s husband dies.” and “Nothing will ever happen to me.”

General Quotes

• Clarice’s face had “a kind of gentle hunger that touched over everything with tireless curiosity”.
• “He felt his smile slide away, melt, fold over, and down on itself like a tallow skin, like the stuff of a fantastic candle burning too long and now collapsing and now blown out. Darkness.”
• A stomach pump: “looking for all the old water and old time gathered there… Did it drink of the darkness?... The impersonal operation… could gaze into the soul of the person whom he was pumping out.”
• “The world had melted down and sprung up in a new and colorless formation.”
• “He slapped her face with amazing objectivity.” (It is not being condoned.)
• “She made the empty rooms roar with accusation and shake down a fine dust of guilt that was sucked into their nostrils and they plunged about.” That’s why owners shouldn’t be present.
• “Time has fallen asleep in the afternoon sunshine.” A line from a poem by Alexander Smith that Montag glimpses, “but it blazed in his mind for the next minutes as if stamped there with fiery steel.”
• “His hand had been infected [by picking up a book], and soon it would be his arms. He could feel the poison working up… His hands were ravenous. And his eyes were beginning to feel hunger, as if they must look at something, anything, everything.”
• “I don’t talk things… I talk the meanings of things.”
• “If you read fast and read all, maybe some of the sand will stay in the sieve.”
• “The good writers touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies.”
• “They were like a monstrous crystal chandelier tinkling in a thousand chimes, he saw their Cheshire Cat smiles burning through the walls.”
• "There was a crash like falling parts of a dream fashioned out of warped glass, mirrors, and crystal prisms."
• “We cannot tell the precise moment when friendship is formed. As in filling a vessel drop by drop, there is at last a drop which makes it run over; so in a series of kindnesses there is at last one which makes the heart run over.” From Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson.
• A buzzing helicopter “like butterflies puzzled by autumn”.
• A ten-lane highway: “A boatless river frozen there in the raw light of the high white arc-lamps; you could drown trying to cross it.”
• “His nose was suddenly good enough to sense the path he had made in the air of the room.”

Homework

I choose to inhale and absorb the atmosphere of the book, without stopping every few sentences to investigate each possible reference and quote, but those who enjoy literary detective work will find plenty of material here.

The other mystery is Captain Beatty: he is remarkably well-versed in the classics of literature, philosophy and history. “I was using the very books you clung to, to rebut you… What traitors books can be.” But is that explanation enough?

What Book Would You Be for Posterity?

The obvious question is, if you were going to become a book and memorise it for posterity, what would you choose? Would it be cheating to pick "Fahrenheit 451"? Should it be for personal comfort or something that will be useful in rebuilding society?

The hardest questions is, would you give up everything for literature?

“All we can do is keep the knowledge… We’re no more than dust jackets for books, of no significance otherwise… You’re not important. You’re not anything. Some day the load we’re carrying with us may help someone.” When people ask what we do, “We’re remembering”.

In Summary

I love the fact that this book is a paean to the power of the written word: that people will live and die for it, and will wither without the transformative power of fictional worlds and the insights of others. The lure and love of literature is irrepressible. Books "stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us."

Postscript

Related to this - and to 1984 - Derek (Guilty of thoughtcrime) wrote in a group discussion: "there's a distinct echo in both books of the Garden of Eden story, with Eve tempting Adam to eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. And in each case, it's a denial of the dogma that this is the original sin."
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Quotes Cecily Liked

Ray Bradbury
“The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us.”
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Ray Bradbury
“Have you ever watched the jet cars race on the boulevard?...I sometimes think drivers don’t know what grass is, or flowers, because they never see them slowly...If you showed a driver a green blur, Oh yes! He'd say, that’s grass! A pink blur! That’s a rose garden! White blurs are houses. Brown blurs are cows.”
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Ray Bradbury
“The autumn leaves blew over the moonlit pavement in such a way as to make the girl who was moving there seem fixed to a sliding walk, letting the motion of the wind and the leaves carry her forward. [...] The trees overhead made a great sound of letting down their dry rain.”
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Ray Bradbury
“A book is a loaded gun in the house next door...Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?”
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451


Reading Progress

12/09/2015 marked as: currently-reading 2 comments
12/10/2015 page 1
0.0% "I open the autumnal pages (crisp, dry, and yellowing) with some trepidation: I have strong and positive memories of previous readings, but I’ve become a more analytical reader in recent years (thank you, GR friends). I hope to find more, rather than less, between the covers." 7 comments
12/11/2015 page 45
21.0% "The plot, characters, and message are familiar, but I had completely forgotten how beautiful some of the writing is. (Or maybe I never noticed before.) Lots of moonlight and startling contrasts:
“The trees made a great sound of letting down their dry rain.” (p13)
“They walked in the warm-cool blowing night on the silvered pavement.” (p14)"
12/14/2015 page 110
52.0% "“Those who do not build must burn.” (Ignite the fire, or be consumed by it?)
(p89)" 3 comments
12/15/2015
80.0% ""There was a crash like falling parts of a dream fashioned out of warped glass, mirrors, and crystal prisms."" 6 comments
12/15/2015 marked as: read
12/15/2015 marked as: currently-reading
12/15/2015 page 211
100.0% "Even better than the 5* I remembered.
Now I just need to update my review..."
12/16/2015 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-50 of 52) (52 new)


Philip A nice, timely review of Mr. Bradbury. Not all of his work his held up so well, but this book remains a true classic. He will be missed!


Mark Have often thought to read this.


Chris That's a tough question, but I don't think it would be cheating.


Apatt "So the obvious question is, if you were going to become a book and memorise it for posterity, what would you choose? "

I pity the guy who chooses "Fifty Shades" or "The Best of Robert J Sawyer".

What I would do is I'll memorize all your reviews on GR and when the state of dystopia is over and books are back in vogue I'll pass these off as my own ;)


Cecily Ha ha, Apatt, and very kind, but why settle for a copy or precis, rather than an original?


Apatt Cecily wrote: "Ha ha, Apatt, and very kind, but why settle for a copy or precis, rather than an original?"

I like short and sweet, like Jenna Coleman ;)


message 7: by Cecily (last edited Aug 27, 2014 05:35AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cecily Did you like Capaldi as the new Doctor?
(In an entirely different way, I hasten to add!)


Apatt Cecily wrote: "Did you like Capaldi as the new Doctor?"

Oh yeah, he's great! Great eyebrows action!

My brother is also a doctor, but alas not a Time Lord. He's a pediatrician, so even when I'm ill he's pretty useless!


message 9: by Cecily (last edited Aug 27, 2014 05:45AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cecily a doctor is, sadly, not the same as The Doctor. As for your brother, surely he'd be of some use if you got the sort of injury or infection that children usually get? ;)

I already liked Capaldi as an actor, and you can see shades of Malcolm Tucker in his Doctor. I think he'll be good, even though the opening episode spent rather too long on Clara coming to terms with his transformation.


Apatt Cecily wrote: "a doctor is, sadly, not the same as The Doctor. As for your brother, surely he'd be of some use if you caught the sort of thing children most often get? ;)

I already liked Capaldi as an actor, and..."


Well, hopefully we can welcome you back to the Whovian fold. You don't even need a fez any more.


Cecily Apatt wrote: "Well, hopefully we can welcome you back to the Whovian fold. You don't even need a fez any more."

But I bought a fez in Morocco last autumn (for my son)!

Anyway, I was never really OUT of the Whovian fold, but I'm not an obsessive either. (I'll never rewatch another Pertwee one, though. I don't want to spoil my happy memories.)


message 12: by Mary (new)

Mary Interesting that the fundamental fire problem is now solved - praise to e-books.


Cecily Mary wrote: "Interesting that the fundamental fire problem is now solved - praise to e-books."

Yes, but on the other hand, with dead trees, you don't have to worry about obsolete technology making them impossible to read, and as for the fire:
description


Nandakishore Varma I loved the premise, but did not enjoy the novel so much. But it has frightening relevance in the era of "Boko Haram".


message 15: by Cecily (last edited Dec 16, 2015 10:37PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cecily Nandakishore wrote: "I loved the premise, but did not enjoy the novel so much. But it has frightening relevance in the era of "Boko Haram"."

Sorry, I missed this comment until I marked that I'm rereading the book.

Yes, Boko Haram, and ISIS/Daesh, which reminds me that I really ought to read I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban.


Cecily Thanks, but it's OLD.
There will be an all-singing, all-dancing, brand shiny new one when I finish rereading it.


message 17: by Erika (new) - added it

Erika Cecily wrote: "Thanks, but it's OLD.
There will be an all-singing, all-dancing, brand shiny new one when I finish rereading it."


I'm looking forward to comparing your old and new reviews even if it turns out that the text stays quiet on my screen and refrains from dancing. I've never actually read the book, but it's been on my list forever.


Cecily Erika wrote: "I'm looking forward to comparing your old and new reviews even if it turns out that the text stays quiet on my screen and refrains from dancing..."

Ha ha. Thank you, Erika. I confess that the new review won't actually dance across your screen (I'm not a fan of animated GIFs), but there will be more of it. Whether or not that's a good thing, is not for me to decide.

It's not a long book, and so far, it's even better than I remember, so I commend it to you.


message 19: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Fascinating review, marvellous quotes - and I loved the cartoon with the kindle and the book ♥


message 20: by Steve (new)

Steve Great insights, as usual, Cecily. You've got me excited to touch a much-loved book.


Joshie This awesome review makes me want to re-read it again.


Cecily Caroline wrote: "Fascinating review, marvellous quotes - and I loved the cartoon with the kindle and the book ♥"

Thank you, Caroline - though having reread the book since posting that cartoon, it feels a tad disrespectful.


Cecily Steve wrote: "Great insights, as usual, Cecily. You've got me excited to touch a much-loved book."

Thank you, and please do reread it, love it, touch it, and treasure it.


message 24: by Cecily (last edited Dec 17, 2015 12:36AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cecily Joshie wrote: "This awesome review makes me want to re-read it again."

Gosh, thank you, Joshie. I see from your own excellent review how similar our thoughts are.


Parthiban Sekar Coming in for a treat and there it is... double treat. Love the new as well as old review. Absolutely stunning reviews of one of my favorites! :D


Duane Great review Cecily. Probably the most thorough and insightful review ever written for this novel.


Cindy Newton Fantastic review! Both were thorough and insightful. You've made me want to reread it--I don't know of a better compliment than that.


Amanda Wonderful and thorough review, Cecily! This book is one of my all time favorites. "The public stopped reading of its own accord" - so glad that Goodreads proves that the love of books is very much alive and well!


message 29: by Lily (new)

Lily Amazing review, Cecily. Sounds like a powerful novel that will never stop being timely. This is one of those classic sci-fi books that I haven't read yet, but I can't wait to change that. :)


Dolors "To me, as I wrote, it's about the power of a passion for books, but it's commonly described as being more about censorship and totalitarianism (sadly apt after the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris in January 2015), while Bradbury himself saw it more as an anti-TV novel."
I find it incredible the way certain books defy the passage of time by delivering a message that can be adapted to an ever changing reality. Impressive selection of quotes classified by thematic lines that has convinced me of my need to revisit this classic. And thank you for providing such a delicate soundtrack (falling of leaves and raindrops) to Bradbury's cautionary tale.


Cecily Parthiban wrote: "Coming in for a treat and there it is... double treat. Love the new as well as old review. Absolutely stunning reviews of one of my favorites! :D"

Thank you, Parthiban - though it's no longer a double treat, as I changed my mind and merged my old review with the new.


Cecily Duane wrote: "Great review Cecily. Probably the most thorough and insightful review ever written for this novel."

You're very kind - too kind. But thank you. I will now scour GR for the better reviews that I'm sure are here.


Cecily Cindy wrote: "Fantastic review! Both were thorough and insightful. You've made me want to reread it--I don't know of a better compliment than that."

Thank you so much, Cindy. That is indeed a powerful compliment.
(I hope you don't mind that there's no longer a "both" - I've merged them.)


Cecily Lily wrote: "Amazing review, Cecily. Sounds like a powerful novel that will never stop being timely. This is one of those classic sci-fi books that I haven't read yet, but I can't wait to change that. :)"

Thank you, and yes, it is powerful and timely, and because it's so beautifully written and not very long, it's perfect for people who are wary of sci-fi. Those who aren't, have not excuse for not reading it!
;)


message 35: by Cecily (last edited Dec 18, 2015 01:39AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cecily Dolors wrote: "I find it incredible the way certain books defy the passage of time by delivering a message that can be adapted to an ever changing reality."

The mark, perhaps the most important one, of a great work of art in any medium.

In terms of books, I suppose it also applies to religious works, such as The Bible.

Dolors wrote: "Impressive selection of quotes classified by thematic lines that has convinced me of my need to revisit this classic.."

Thanks. There were so many I wanted to include, I had to split them up somehow. Reading it now, I cannot believe how little I'd appreciated that aspect on previous readings.

Dolors wrote: "And thank you for providing such a delicate soundtrack (falling of leaves and raindrops) to Bradbury's cautionary tale."

Thanks, but the credit should go to Bradbury: the language inspires and deserves such a response.


message 36: by Billy (new)

Billy O'Callaghan What a tremendously in-depth review, Cecily. I've read this one a number of times over the years (Bradbury is one of my two or three favourite writers), but I'll read it with new eyes next time I pick it up. Thanks for sharing such thoughtful and thought-provoking opinions!


Cecily Thank you, Billy. I read it with new eyes myself this time. If I can contribute to giving anyone else a bit of that experience, I'm pleased (and flattered).


Sharyl Beautiful review, Cecily. It's a reminder that classics should not be read once only and put back on the shelf, but kept alive through the years with fresh perspective.


Cecily Sharyl wrote: "Beautiful review, Cecily. "

Sharyl, thank you.

Sharyl wrote: "It's a reminder that classics should not be read once only and put back on the shelf, but kept alive through the years with fresh perspective."

Yes, I agree, and it's truer of this book than many.


Apatt I just realised that the 451-ing of books will mean books will only be available in audiobooks format. Also, you will have to review them verbally in High Park or something!
Worse than The Hunger Games eh? ;)


Cecily Ah, but the plan was to memorise books so they could eventually be written down again.
Still, having talking books at Speakers' Corner would be an improvement on talking bollocks at Speakers' Corner, as often happens now!


Apatt Cecily wrote: "Ah, but the plan was to memorise books so they could eventually be written down again.
Still, having talking books at Speakers' Corner would be an improvement on talking bollocks at Speakers' Corn..."





message 43: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Ansbro Cecily wrote: "Mary wrote: "Interesting that the fundamental fire problem is now solved - praise to e-books."

Yes, but on the other hand, with dead trees, you don't have to worry about obsolete technology making..."


Aside from your jaw-droppingly excellent review, Cecily, I enjoyed this cartoon sequence! I love watching hubris unfold, even within electronic devices!


Cecily Thank you, Kevin. Your praise is all the more welcome from a proper, published writer!

As for electronic devices, I value them highly. But not for literature.


Apatt I do have one complaint about your reviews, they have a tendency to dislocate my jaws (͠≖ ͜ʖ͠≖)


Apatt Cecily wrote: "LOL. Would this help?
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I..."


LOL! OK, when I read your next review of that "hot" book (sorry, forgot the title) I'll strap that on proceeding. ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ


Cecily I reviewed the "hot" book, which is not hot at all in the sexy sense, here:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
But I don't think you'll need a device to read it.


Helen Just finished reading 451 and loved it!! Thanks for your great review!


Cecily Helen wrote: "Just finished reading 451 and loved it!! Thanks for your great review!"

I'm so glad you loved the book. Sometimes books like this are so iconic that it can be hard to enjoy them in their own right. I'm glad that wasn't the case for you. And thanks for you kind words about my review.


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