anarki's Reviews > Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Jan 26, 14

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Read from January 07 to 23, 2012

The intense psychological pressure from Raskolnikov(Main Character) is something I can empathize. I feel like I'm Raskolnikov. I projected myself as him. His hysteric symptoms, hypochondrias, thought processes, suffering and disgust. Identification really played a big part here. To emphatize a murderer, and to find yourself to having that kind of capacity to do the same. At some very clear point, our minds meet. And I am not surprised. Every single time I watch the News from the Television and read from the newspapers, I feel the same way Raskolnikov felt for the pawnbroker. Pure, very reasonable disgust. To exterminate all the corrupt politicians and criminals(or any of that sort), one must shed blood. Skulls are thick. Words don't work. The violence is necessary. One life in exchange for millions. Would that hurt the world that much? Though violence was necessary, what kind of peace would transpire from it?

Click here to read a faint literary attempt to save the world

Raskolnikov thinks that Napoleon was the greatest superman. He believes that Napoleon wouldn't have had a problem committing murder and that he would not be feeling any guilt at all over the matter; being able to accomplish goals for his principle and for the benefit of others. To commit crime by principle.

The antihero, Raskolnikov, driven by that ideal suffered from tremendous symptoms. Even my stomach reacted when I was reading this book. If you would just step into his shoes, you'll somehow experience that mind-melting psychological tension.

The book shows how dangerous it is to think of yourself as an Overman(as Nietzsche coined it) or an Extraordinary man(as Sir Fyodor coined it) more or less, they're the same. Those who where born extraordinary carry the burden of the awareness of such principle.

In the end, would he submit himself with dignity and taking complete responsibility for whatever he had done?

Conscience, to submit to it, is a divine attribute of the strong. And to surrender, sometimes, is the bravest thing a human being can ever do.

Another thing, the way Dostoyevsky used Dreams in all his writings(especially in this book) gave me goosebumps. The dream distortion was vividly displayed for understanding. The mechanisms of wish-fulfillment and symbolism were really showed in each of his character's dreams. Freud must have been really influenced much by Sir Fyodor. Freud even stated that the book The Karamazov Brothers(Dostovevky's last novel) contained all Psychology and that it was the Most Magnificent Novel Ever Written.. I am now wondering why Sir Fyodor's books were not discussed in our Psychology Classes. I haven't even heard of his name. Seriously, how come?

Dostoyesky's writings primarily deal deeply with the darkest corners of human nature. What lurks beneath our skulls, is it of infinite depth? Can human nature alone, possibly reach that extent of doing such things or was there a God-given impetus or something from a Higher source?
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Quotes anarki Liked

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“The darker the night, the brighter the stars,
The deeper the grief, the closer is God!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“In a morbid condition, dreams are often distinguished by their remarkably graphic, vivid, and extremely lifelike quality. The resulting picture is sometimes monstrous, but the setting and the whole process of the presentation sometimes happen to be so probable, and with details so subtle, unexpected, yet artistically consistent with the whole fullness of the picture, that even the dreamer himself would be unable to invent them in reality, though he were as much an artist as Pushkin or Turgenev. Such dreams, morbid dreams, are always long remembered and produce a strong impression on the disturbed and already excited organism of the person.Raskolnikov had a terrible dream.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“What do you think, would not one tiny crime be wiped out by thousands of good deeds?”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Do you understand, sir, do you understand what it means when you have absolutely nowhere to turn?" Marmeladov’s question came suddenly into his mind "for every man must have somewhere to turn...”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“To go wrong in one's own way is better then to go right in someone else's.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Man grows used to everything, the scoundrel!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Ah, Father! That’s words and only words! Forgive! If he’d not been run over, he’d have come home today drunk and his only shirt dirty and in rags and he’d have fallen asleep like a log, and I should have been sousing and rinsing till daybreak, washing his rags and the children’s and then drying them by the window and as soon as it was daylight I should have been darning them. What’s the use of talking forgiveness! I have forgiven as it is!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“What do you think?" shouted Razumihin, louder than ever, "you think I am attacking them for talking nonsense? Not a bit! I like them to talk nonsense. That's man's one privilege over all creation. Through error you come to the truth! I am a man because I err! You never reach any truth without making fourteen mistakes and very likely a hundred and fourteen. And a fine thing, too, in its way; but we can't even make mistakes on our own account! Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's. In the first case you are a man, in the second you're no better than a bird. Truth won't escape you, but life can be cramped. There have been examples. And what are we doing now? In science, development, thought, invention, ideals, aims, liberalism, judgment, experience and everything, everything, everything, we are still in the preparatory class at school. We prefer to live on other people's ideas, it's what we are used to! Am I right, am I right?" cried Razumihin, pressing and shaking the two ladies' hands.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“The fear of appearances is the first symptom of impotence.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“We sometimes encounter people, even perfect strangers, who begin to interest us at first sight, somehow suddenly, all at once, before a word has been spoken.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“And the more I drink the more I feel it. That's why I drink too. I try to find sympathy and feeling in drink.... I drink so that I may suffer twice as much!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“It's the moon that makes it so still, weaving some mystery.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“When reason fails, the devil helps!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“I did not bow down to you, I bowed down to all the suffering of humanity.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“There is nothing in the world more difficult than candor, and nothing easier than flattery. If there is a hundredth of a fraction of a false note to candor, it immediately produces dissonance, and as a result, exposure. But in flattery, even if everything is false down to the last note, it is still pleasant, and people will listen not without pleasure; with coarse pleasure, perhaps, but pleasure nevertheless. ”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“It takes something more than intelligence to act intelligently.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Truly great men must, I think, experience great sorrow on the earth.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment


Reading Progress

01/07/2012 page 1
0.0% "This was supposed to be page zero. Because, it doesn't really start at page one."
01/10/2012 page 106
15.0% "Murder"
01/11/2012 page 156
22.0% "Dostoyevsky > Freud Thank you so much Pupkin :)" 2 comments
01/11/2012 page 183
26.0% "Delirium"
01/12/2012 page 247
35.0% "Anti-Social"
01/19/2012 page 369
52.0% "End of the Withdrawal Syndrome."
01/20/2012 page 493
70.0% "Totally Brilliant Mind-Fucking. So this is how it feels like to Explore the depths of the Human Mind years ago..."
06/22/2013 marked as: currently-reading
06/22/2013 page 31
4.0% "i am"
01/26/2014 marked as: read
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Comments (showing 1-12 of 12) (12 new)

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Richard I'm impressed that you are tackling this. I found it very strange but it's a great novel! I have tried to read The Brothers Karamazov but haven't made it all the way through yet. Also good is Tolstoy's short story The Death of Ivan Ilyich.


jzhunagev Dostoevsky will and forever the author who ruined my childhood! It's a favorite book!
Raskolnikov FTW!


anarki FTW! It was a very long read and a very deep one.

I feel like I'm Raskolnikov. hahahaha. I projected myself as him. His thought process and suffering. Identification really played a big part here. To emphatize a murderer, and find yourself to having that kind of capacity to do the same. FTW!


jzhunagev nik wrote: "To emphatize a murderer, and find yourself to having that kind of capacity to do the same."

Oh my, so you have that proclivity to murder someone? Haha! :D


message 5: by anarki (last edited Jan 23, 2012 05:14PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

anarki jzhunagev wrote: "nik wrote: "To emphatize a murderer, and find yourself to having that kind of capacity to do the same."

Oh my, so you have that proclivity to murder someone? Haha! :D"


Yes. And I am not surprised. Every single time I watch the News, I feel the same way Raskolnikov felt to the pawnbroker. To exterminate all the corrupt politicians and criminals(or any of that sort), one must shed blood. I would be more than happy to shed my own blood. Skulls are thick. The violence is necessary. One life in exchange for millions. That's more than enough. Again, I would gladly give up my life for that sole goal. . .However, I had this realization that this life is not only mine, not entirely mine. . . .How about my parents and friends? I would die for them for that goal, but I'm pretty sure that they won't allow that thing to happen. And also . . Though violence was necessary, what kind of peace would transpire from it?

Years ago, I used to have that kind of irritable and despicable state of mind at a young age. That sense of responsibility of doing something for the world just sprouted out of nowhere. Reading the book brought me back to those darker years.


jzhunagev My friend, you are now feeling the same schism that Raskolnikov experienced.


anarki That's also the reason why I like the band tool, they have a song titled: Schism

I agree. ahahaha. It's like visiting a familiar corner of my mind.


AriaTheBookNerd It reminded me of another book.
Perfume. I saw that you read that one. :P


anarki I will write a review for that as well :) hihihihihihi


anarki Why the hell am I reading murderous stuff? ahahahahaha


message 11: by AriaTheBookNerd (new)

AriaTheBookNerd Dunno. But I kinda liked it. :)


anarki I am once again exploring the world of chaos. hahahaha


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