John Wiswell's Reviews > On Truth: The Tyranny of Illusion

On Truth by Stefan Molyneux
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May 25, 2008

did not like it
Recommended for: No one
Read in May, 2008

An insipidly self-righteous self-help book. At under a hundred pages, Molyneux doesn't get caught up in things like empirical evidence or thorough arguments for why he might be right about culture, religion, the human mind or your personal life. He thinks he's right, so if you disagree, you're delusional and should re-read this book until you “liberate” yourself. The irony of believing what he tells you instead of what everyone else has ever told you is totally lost on Molyneux. All religion and spirituality are lies, national pride is dead, families are unfortunate to even exist, emotional and rational motives apparently don’t cross, and anything except what he defines as totally rational behavior and thought is contemptible. Every topic and “hard question” he tackles has been approached with significantly greater depth, intelligence and research by people who both agree and disagree with him. He makes far too many sweeping statements and is far too antagonistic towards other value systems to merit a fair hearing, but damned if I didn’t try.
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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message 1: by David (new)

David Robins Heh heh, got to you, didn't it?


Cody Dodd lol^


message 3: by Lemanakmelo (new)

Lemanakmelo This book was an introduction to his future works. I think in the book he even says something like this, that he is keeping it short and introductory. Read "Universally Preferable Behaviour: A Rational Proof of Secular Ethics" for thorough arguments.


message 4: by John (new) - rated it 1 star

John Wiswell Lemanakmelo wrote: "This book was an introduction to his future works. I think in the book he even says something like this, that he is keeping it short and introductory. Read "Universally Preferable Behaviour: A Rati..."

I have plenty of better books available providing superior arguments, but thank you anyway.


Marc D John, families unfortunate even to exist? if you are suggesting Molyneux would say or think that than you may have read an entirely different book all together. Molyneux focuses most of his work on applying philosophy to parenting. You might hear him say it is unfortunate that children have to grow up having their innate freedom crushed by ideas if god and country or that children are born into the slavery of national debt but he would only suggest that it is the family that could change this. In fact he takes his optimism for this idea to an extreme and has suggested that it is his how that we are within the grasp of freedom at all times by 2 generations of good parenting. I don't find many arguments in your review to dismiss any of Molyneux's ideas where I know, because I've read it 3 times over the last 4 months, he goes through each of his arguments with rational proof.


Marc D Please recommend what you feel is something more worth reading... thats why we are here right? Thanks! I don't agree with your assessment but I want to learn where you are coming from.


Richard M.Monroe The book was an utter waste of time.


message 8: by Andras (new)

Andras "He makes far too many sweeping statements..." yet the reviewer provides not a single example or quote of Molyneux that is sweeping.


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