Sarah Hayes's Reviews > A History of the World Since 9/11: Disaster, Deception, and Destruction in the War on Terror

A History of the World Since 9/11 by Dominic Streatfeild
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
3294425
's review
Nov 23, 11

bookshelves: politics-history
Read from November 22 to 23, 2011

A solid, startling read on how the war on terror has changed the world - for the worse - and that in the end, everyone is to blame for what has happened since 9/11 and how the United States responded to it. Some of the more specific phraseology goes mentioned without definition, which can be irritating. Streatfeild does a good job of not inserting himself heavily into the narrative beyond the introduction and lets the eight stories speak for themselves. Looking forward to reading more works by him.
Likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read A History of the World Since 9/11.
Sign In »

Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Starbubbles (new)

Starbubbles It seems to me that Streatfeild asserted a lot of himself into the analysis of the events during the last ten years. You could say that weapons development, environmental impact awareness, and the interdependency of global economics, more specifically global currency. You could also say that Americans have a greater awareness of Muslim and Middle Eastern conflict, and that would be a positive that directly relates to the War on Terror.

Seeing as I had not read this bk, my comment is solely based on your review. I just get agitated when historians jump the gun and try to analyze events too soon. You have to let the emotional and political charge fade a little. The wait time is at least 20yrs. Though bks like this are interesting in mapping public memory and reactions to events.


Sarah Hayes Starbubbles wrote: "It seems to me that Streatfeild asserted a lot of himself into the analysis of the events during the last ten years. You could say that weapons development, environmental impact awareness, and the..."

I don't think he has, at least that's how it read to me. I mean, occasionally his views leak into the narrative, but I find it hard to read a non-fiction analytical book that is 100% non-biased or without some introspection on the part of the author.

I just . . . really hate the phrase "War on Terror". How does one declare war on a concept or idea, exactly? Anyway, I'm glad Americans are becoming more aware of the Muslim world and how the Middle East works as well as how it's been unfortunately shaped by imperialist/colonialist interference; I just wish it didn't come out of sending troops and drones into the area.

You should def read this book! It's not even a history so much as a series of stories chronicling incidents that arose around 9/11, which means the title is a little (a lot) misleading but still. And I think books like these are a little necessary in the wake of the United States' response to 9/11 because a lot of our country's actions were not without reproach and there is a lot the government could have done to prevent that horrible day from happening like it did (and if that kind of thing interests you, look up John O'Neill, who was a part of the FBI post-9/11 and basically was one of the few men inside the agency who realized how big a threat Al-Qaeda was to America and knew that an attack was imminent but was ignored and silence by his bosses to the point of straight-out character slander against the man).

AHEM. Sorry, I have a lot of feels and no way to hold them. Hopefully I gave a meaningful response to your comment. /bows out of a very tl;dr response/


back to top