Bex's Reviews > Flowers in the Attic

Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
185
's review
May 18, 08

Recommended for: People who read it in the 1980s
Read in May, 2008

I have no perspective on this book. I can't separate it from my teenage self.

For the first 200 pages I was amused to be re-reading a book I had loved as a teenager. I LOVED this book in the 1980s, and I'm guessing that had something to do with the titillating subject matter but it might also have been because I was desperate to get away from my hometown and start my life and there is a theme of isolation and a desperation to get out into the world and be free. It's a theme lots of teens could relate to, certainly.

That said, those first 200 pages made me giggle at the absurdity of the dialogue, the over-the-top characterizations, and whacked-out plot.

But something happened during the second half of the book for me. I feel like I slipped into a time machine and became my 14-year-old self for several hours on Saturday afternoon. I couldn't turn the pages fast enough, couldn't stand to put the book down, and had cereal for dinner just so I didn't have to leave my apartment.

Seriously. I don't even understand it. The writing is silly and melodramatic (and the dialogue is laughable) but there is something about V.C. Andrews's prose that keeps the story hustling along at a nice and speedy clip. And perhaps the fact that the dialogue slips away in the second half in favor of dark and twisted plot turns has something to do with that.

I'm buying Petals on the Wind today. I am a tiny bit ashamed but I flat-out can't wait for Cathy's revenge!
12 likes · Likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Flowers in the Attic.
Sign In »

Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Anne (new)

Anne I have to say that I was never allowed near these books when I was a teenager, but find myself sucked into the really bad movie version that pops up on cable with some degree of regularity. Bill even watches it with me.


message 2: by Bex (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bex Um, I've been meaning to tell you that I am thinking of starting a "bad" book club! It would be filled with guilty pleasures old and new with a special emphasis on books we loved as teens/read as teens/were forbidden to read as teens and what we think of them as grown up.

Flowers in the Attic would be the FIRST book in the club! Hee! I've only seen the movie once and I remember being WOEFULLY disappointed in it.


Becomingme I too just bought the second book...and yes, I read this as a teen, but even after all this time, I'm still loving the series for much the reasons you state8-O


Katie Bex I could not agree with your review more!! I just finished rereading it last night (I had read it in middle school), and same as you... could not put it down once I hit the second half. And I cried like a BABY when Cory died. Like, sobbed. Don't know why, I knew it was coming. Even though the writing is over the top, melodramatic, and the dialogue is ridiculous, V.C. Andrews still has a way of conveying emotion in a way that 'gets you'..... I, too, will be running out to buy the second book.


message 5: by Bex (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bex Katie wrote: "Bex I could not agree with your review more!! I just finished rereading it last night (I had read it in middle school), and same as you... could not put it down once I hit the second half. And I cr..."

I have to say that other books in the series don't hold up as well. I couldn't get through them all.


Katie Truth be told I have yet to make it through a whole series of any V.C. Andrews books... they all eventually just start sounding the same. I will give Petals a shot though...


Tiayra  Tucker I originally read this when I was 9, and my life was so dark that this book wasn't shocking. In fact, my mother gave it to me after she had already read it. It really helped me process what I had been through.

Yes, the dialogue is silly. It's a 12-year-old girl talking to her brother in the 1950's. I do feel like a child again when I read it, and I suddenly remember things that happened to me as if they happened to someone else.

To me, it's not so far fetched. Children are abandoned all the time for a lot less than millions of dollars, and lots of southern women from the grandmother's generation were quick to quote the bible & use physical punishments. Children were to be seen and not heard.

I agree with your review - I don't know how is react to reading this book now if I hadn't first read it so long ago, when I needed it.


message 8: by Bex (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bex Tiayra wrote: "I originally read this when I was 9, and my life was so dark that this book wasn't shocking. In fact, my mother gave it to me after she had already read it. It really helped me process what I had b..."

I think it's always amazing when a book happens to find a person at the perfect time in their life--I'm glad you had this book. And I'm glad I did, too.


Kimberly So true! I absolutely loved VC Andrews when I was a teen to young adult and read almost all her books. All my friends were reading them. I would sneak them inside my schoolbooks and read during class! I even had a dog named Audrina, after "My Sweet Audrina". I recently found "Flowers" for $2 on Amazon Kindle so I thought I'd take a peek at it and see if it was the same. At first I thought it was ridiculously cheesy and not my taste at all and I doubted if finish it, plus I was pretty embarrassed to be reading it. I almost didn't post it to Goodreads, lol! But by halfway into it it had sucked me in and I could not put it down! It's trashy and cheesy but there's something very compelling about it. And I know they really did encourage a generation of girls to read, much like HP today. Now as a Christian homeschool mom I would NOT want my 13 year old daughter to read these books AT ALL, at least not now, but it's tempting since she's a reluctant reader. But I want to go back and re-read all of them!


back to top