Crystal Starr Light's Reviews > Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
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Jan 11, 14

bookshelves: book-club, young-adult, so-bad-it-s-horrible, ha-ha-ha-no-really, read-at-your-own-risk
Read from October 07 to 14, 2011

Looks can be deceiving

Who hasn't seen this creepy book, lurking proudly in the "New Releases" section? It practically SCREAMS Halloween--a nice, delightful scare that makes you lock your doors tighter, leave on the nightlight, and snuggle deeply under your covers.

Only...it doesn't.

Sure, the girl looks REALLY creepy on the cover and many of the back images are enough to give you the eebie jeebies, but NOTHING that remotely scary EVER occurs within these pages. Okay, maybe the very first scene, where Jacob sees the Thing for the first time, can count. But I am not the most stalwart of persons. I turn away at blood and gore in movies, my stomach churns when I read about gobbets of flesh, and I was scared of the Stay-Puff Marshmallow guy until about two years ago. So when I say that I had no troubles reading this at 11:30 at night and then going to sleep peacefully, you know this isn't that scary.

And that is only one of the many failures of this potentially awesome book. This book promises to do something rarely seen in fiction: combine pictures with a story. But there it fails yet again. The pictures are awkwardly inserted into the story, usually surrounded by text along the lines of: "And X showed Y a picture of a girl PICTURE HERE". Not what I would call the most "seamless" of storytelling.

And let's talk about characters, or what passes for characters in this book, starting with Jacob. I really need to get this off my back, so please excuse me here:

What a selfish, whiny, obnoxious, pretentious, arrogant little @#$%wad! From the first chapter, where he is trying to get his sorry @ss fired, I hated him (oddly enough, in the Prologue, I actually liked him). We have 14 million Americans without jobs--these are men and women with families, who would take ANY job they could get their hands on just to put food on the table--and here this joker misbehaves at work, treating his boss with disrespect, and gets away with it because his uncles own the store. (This doesn't even touch on the millions of non-Americans who are unemployed and destitute, living in squalor, starving, watching their children die, unable to move from their station because brats like Jacob are taking the jobs they could have had.) Other than he doesn't want to be in the "family business", why does he act this way? I have no clue. I would think the supposedly "smart" Jacob would realize that this behavior isn't the most mature way of handling the situation and would, I dunno, maybe talk with his parents or uncles about the job situation if he didn't like it, but apparently, Jacob is merely smart in the way that most authors make their characters smart, i.e. a sentence saying "X is smart".

Jacob is hardly relatable; his parents are obscenely wealthy (how convenient), making it easy for Jacob to go to Wales. Jacob is constantly acting like a diva, complaining about all the wealth he has (must be nice), while reveling in what it can get him access to. He drops words like "Sisyphean" but never comes across like the type of kid who would do that (such as Anne Shirley).

But poor Jacob, he doesn't have any friends! Well, maybe it's because his abrasive, self-righteous, privileged personality chases them away.

But poor Jacob, his mommy and daddy don't listen to every word he says and believe him! Well, maybe it's because a traumatic incident happened, and they are dealing with their own grief. Or maybe it's because they are too busy at work, trying to make enough money to send our resident brat to Wales.

So what could have been a strong character (like Quentin from John Green's "Paper Towns") comes off like a 5 year old who hasn't realized that the world doesn't revolve around him.

Other characters are so flat, it's pathetic. The parents are cold and impersonal, all the better for Jacob to "run away" to his fantasy friends (which, by the way, I predicted would happen at about the 130 page mark). Every one of the "peculiar children" has only one note to play and has no background, nothing to make them remarkable beyond the one ability that Riggs has given them that may or may not have anything to do with the picture (such as the girl with the mouth in the back of her head--what was up with that???). They are introduced sloppily, awkwardly tying into their picture. And thinking about these "children": isn't it odd that they look and act like children? Shouldn't we see something more along the lines of Kirsten Dunst's character in the movie, "Interview with a Vampire"--an adult stuck in a child's body? In fact, why are these "children" able to experience the passage of time at all, but the town around them recreates the same day over and over again? If it was explained in the book, I didn't catch it.

About the only one that does stand out is Emma, because she is Designated Love InterestTM. Which is disgusting, as 70 years ago, she was canoodling Jacob's grandfather. God, why does every young adult novel nowadays require a romance? I was really hoping with this book that we wouldn't have a romance, and based on the write-up, I assumed it would avoid this all-too-common YA trope. But no, we have to have a romantic couple in here, because we have to do something to draw in the preteen and teen Twilight crowd. I mean, it's not like there are girls out there who like Star Wars, Star Trek, Lord of the Rings, and stuff for more than just the sexy times. I guess if A) Jacob had been likeable, B) Emma had been likeable and not been his grandfather's age, and C) the romance had been well-done and not rushed I would have liked it, but alas, it was D) none of the above.

And what is it with all these guys being attracted to ice cold women pointing knives into their bellies? Do I need to read more Freud or something?

So for story...

*bursts into gales of laughter*

Oh, sorry about that. *wipes tears from eyes* Yeah, story. Well, the beginning was pretty interesting, with Jacob discovering his grandfather's past. But after finding Miss Peregrine's Home, it just disappears into Sexy Times with Teenaged Looking 80-Year Olds until the author realized he could include another plot and extend the book another 100 pages. And then, as if this book didn't p!ss me off enough, the book ends on basically a cliffhanger prepping for a sequel. A SEQUEL! This book didn't deserve a full novel, much less a SEQUEL!

And let me get yet another pet peeve out of the way: World War II? Really? Jacob is 16; his grandfather was a teenager in WWII? Not that this isn't possible (Thank you to all those who took the time to comment and point out how common this actually is in real life!!), but we do realize that children that are 16 right now can have grandparents born in the 40's and 50's (or even 60's and 70's)** right? What is our obsession with WWII? If something bad happens, drag in the Nazis? Or is it the fact that no one wants to touch the highly controversial Vietnam War? I'm not even 28, and I have grandfathers who served and grandmothers who would have been children. If my grandparents were the appropriate age to join the war, I would think that Jacob, who is 16 (if this story takes place in 2011, of course), would have even younger grandparents than mine (and mine are on the "old" side--they had my parents when they were in their 30's/40's).

I am guessing the ONLY REASON this book is doing well is John Green's bold endorsement on the back: "A tense, moving, and wondrously strange first novel. The photographs and text work together brilliantly to create an unforgettable story." Besides the fact that for the first 50 horrible pages, in which the book tries and fails to be the next John Green novel, this book is about as far from "tense, moving, and wondrously strange" as it could get. As for the "photographs and text work[ing] together", no way, not at all.

The sad thing is, the Prologue was absolutely amazing. It DID have that creepy portent that the cover promised. It DID have an interesting character--the grandfather and Jacob (who hadn't jumped head first off the Likeable Cliff yet). But all that was wasted in what seemed to be a lack of plot, a horrible protagonist (whom I wanted to smack some sense into) and trying too hard to be quirky and funny like a contemporary John Green novel. Very disappointing and not recommended. I will NOT be checking out any sequels in this series.

** Why did I say 60's/70's? Sure, maybe a grandparent born in 1960 could have had a 16 year old grandchild in 2011, but that would mean that the grandparent had a child when he was 18 and his child had the grandchild at 17--not exactly likely in the 70's/90's!!
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Reading Progress

10/07/2011 page 21
6.0% "Ah, a slacker protagonist! What a way to endear me to him..."
10/08/2011 page 31
9.0% "Whoa, I am having de ja John Green..."
10/10/2011 page 54
15.0% "So, this is supposed to be a scary book? Tone is WAY too jovial, if that is the desired result."
10/10/2011 page 72
20.0% "Good God, I hate this over-priveleged, whiny, childish brat."
10/11/2011 page 101
29.0% "This is most certainly NOT a scary/horror/thriller. A mystery, maybe, but there is nothing scary at all about this book. And the pictures, while creepy, are rather awkwardly inserted into the story at times."
10/12/2011 page 126
36.0% "Still not scary. And I'm surprised our astute, clever protagonist hasn't figured out "he's not in Kansas anymore". D'oh."
10/12/2011 page 139
39.0% "At least it didn't take Jacob half the book to figure out what time he was in."
10/13/2011 page 170
48.0% "Kinda weird how it takes the titular item nearly 150 pages to make an appearance...not sure if that is a good or bad thing honestly"
10/13/2011 page 171
49.0% "WARNING!!! SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF AT CRITICAL LEVELS: This 16 year old knows what Sisyphean is?! I don't, and I'm almost 28!!"
10/13/2011 page 179
51.0% "GOOD GRIEF! I saw this at least 30 pages back--poor, whiny, bratty, overpriveleged teenager is OH SO UNLOVED AND UNWANTED so why not stay in the Fantasy Land? *headdesk, eye roll, projectile vomit*"
10/14/2011 page 237
67.0% "And let's throw in a vaguely incestuous romance. Maybe people will not notice there is no plot to speak of at this point."
10/14/2011 page 244
69.0% "How does that work? Emma is basically an 80-year old woman who has NO TROUBLE necking a 16-year old boy? EW!" 2 comments
10/14/2011 page 248
70.0% ""They don't know where to find us. That and they can't enter loops. So we're safe on the island." NOT A PAGE LATER! "But we're never safe--none of us--not really." HUH???? Make up your mind! Are you safe on the island or not??"

Comments (showing 1-50 of 245) (245 new)


message 1: by Kwoomac (new)

Kwoomac Guess I'll take this off my to-read list and just look at the pictures in the library someday.


Crystal Starr Light Kwoomac wrote: "Guess I'll take this off my to-read list and just look at the pictures in the library someday."

The pictures are definitely creepy. Too bad the story didn't match that. :(


message 3: by Lisa (new)

Lisa well off the must read list for me, too!


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

What a disappointment! Seriously eepy-cray on the teen-looking-granny love interest (and not in that good kind of creepy way either). Great review though. :)


Crystal Starr Light Lilli wrote: "What a disappointment! Seriously eepy-cray on the teen-looking-granny love interest (and not in that good kind of creepy way either). Great review though. :)"

Thank you! Yeah, that part creeped me out too--what, Emma can finally get over Abe once she meets his grandson?? Ew!!


Heather I normally love romantic WWII stuff, but this was nowhere even close to romantic. I was hoping the kid would back away from the girl after he thought about his grandpa with her . . . but no. Yucky.


Crystal Starr Light Heather wrote: "I normally love romantic WWII stuff, but this was nowhere even close to romantic. I was hoping the kid would back away from the girl after he thought about his grandpa with her . . . but no. Yucky."

Definitely!! I'm a little surprised she wasn't a little offput by flirting and rubbing elbows with her old beau's grandson? I think I would...


message 8: by Katherine (new)

Katherine It doesn't sound like a very good book, from all the reviews I've read. Love your point about WWII. I'm 26 and my dad (born in '49) fought in the Vietman war, and my youngest brother is 16. I might have to tempt controversy and write a book about it...


Kari I rather thought Jacob was a prime example of a 16-year-old these days. I don't know where you live, but here in Phoenix, our 16-year-olds are whiny, obnoxious, arrogant, SOBs. It doesn't matter if you, being an adult, know that in real life people these days are fortunate to have jobs. The story is written from the eyes of a child, who, like many children these days, slack off because they can.

Both sets of my grandparents were born in the late 1920s (1927-1929/30), and would be about Jacob's grandfather's age were they alive (save for my grandma who's 82). On the last few pages, it says that Riggs' wife's family gave him the inspiration of survival. Perhaps his wife's grandparents were forced to flee, just as Jacob's grandfather had to do, during the war. Look at Narnia, and the children who flee to an obscure relative's house during WWII! The idea is not new in fiction.

The idea that Jacob essentially dates his grandpa's ex, is a little odd, I grant you that. But given the circumstances of how these peculiar children live, I don't find it overly gross. I think the children are a bit like Claudia from Interview with a Vampire, but choose to act like the children they look like. Would you choose blissful ignorance and a sense of innocence over the harsh realities of growing old? Plus, I found the important characters to be dynamic. Jacob does change by the end of the book. Emma does as well. Do I see Stockholm Syndrome in their relationship, sure. But again, that's not a new idea in fiction either (ie Disney's Beauty and the Beast).

Plus, the loops are a bit like Faery. They exist without existing, and time resets while the outside world carries on. It's the idea that if you leave a loop for too long, you age quickly and turn to dust. Classic faery lore--classic fairy tales as mentioned in the book!

I think this book has more potential, and that's why I'm hoping a sequel surfaces. Did we know all there was to know about Voldemort and the wizarding world in the first book of HP? No. So I'm banking my hope on that.


Crystal Starr Light Thank you for taking the time to comment!

I remember when I was a teenager, and I know that I would not have been so cavalier with having a job. Of course, I also know that each person is different, that times have changed since I was 16, so Jacob being how he was portrayed in the book is probably not unusual. However, I didn't find that opening to make him very endearing to me. And it doesn't really give teenagers the benefit of the doubt--I'm sure not all teenagers are like Jacob, wealthy enough not to have to worry about retail jobs and treating said jobs with disdain and disrespect to authority figures.

The Chronicles of Narnia were written between 1949 and 1954; it makes perfect sense why these books would reference World War II. Children of that era would have lived through it. I'm not saying that World War II is no longer relevant to our culture (far from it!), but I still find it odd that YA books being published in 2011 have protagonists with grandparents who were children during WWII. There are a lot of other eras to draw from, and it would be interesting if Jacob's grandfather could have been from a different era (either that or Jacob himself was perhaps an 80's or 90's child). I also acknowledge that this is a complaint that I personally have; I am suffering WWII fatigue and really don't care for books that bring up WWII for their plots. I know many other people will not have this complaint and that is why I considered that portion of my review a "pet peeve".

I got a different impression of Claudia from Interview with a Vampire. I got that Claudia's mind was growing up, but her body couldn't catch up. This is why Claudia grew frustrated with dolls and didn't want them anymore, and why she lashed out at Louis. Perhaps if Riggs had clarified more about these peculiar children (were they adults in children's bodies?), it wouldn't have been so squicky.

I wouldn't really call "Beauty and the Beast" by Disney a good example of Stockholm Syndrome. Belle didn't really start to love the Beast until he started to shapen up and become more civilized. However, I won't deny that it has occurred with startling and disturbing frequency in fiction.

The way you describe the loops is very interesting; I hadn't quite understood them that way when I read the book, but it does give me a different perception of them.

I am very glad you enjoyed this book. Thank you again for taking the time to express your thoughts; I have enjoyed this discussion and the chance to further my knowledge of this book.


Kaitlin Monier My grandparents were both involved in WWII, and their youngest grandchildren are 16....


Crystal Starr Light Kaitlin wrote: "My grandparents were both involved in WWII, and their youngest grandchildren are 16...."

I would have thought a 16 year old in 2011 having a grandparent that was a child in WWII would be a little more rare, but looks like it isn't. I've been wrong before; guess this is one of those times :P (Though it's still a pet peeve of mine to rely so heavily on WWII imagery)

Thanks for your comment!!


message 13: by Iset (new)

Iset Interesting. My late grandparents ranged between 18 and 14 years old when WWII broke out, so even older, and their youngest grandchild (my younger cousin) is 16. Mind you I do have older cousins approaching 30. But my parents and my younger cousin's parents, well, the story there is that they didn't have children until between the ages of 35-45, so in our family it's quite a long, extended generational gap. Heck, my great-grandparents were born 100 years before me, way back in the late 1880's. (Although, on yet another branch of my family tree there's been quite a fast turnover and I can go back a full 5 generations to my great-great-grandparents being born in the 1880's). Lol, excuse my rambling, you know I get carried away when talking about genealogy.


message 14: by Crystal Starr Light (last edited Mar 05, 2012 02:12PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Crystal Starr Light Isis wrote: "Interesting. My late grandparents ranged between 18 and 14 years old when WWII broke out, so even older, and their youngest grandchild (my younger cousin) is 16. Mind you I do have older cousins ap..."

That is very interesting!! And just proves that it is still possible to have a teenager in modern times with a WWII era grandparent. I would not have realized it was so common--though, as you pointed out too, there are other families that have a faster turn around.

I believe both my grandfathers enlisted in WWII. My grandmothers were born in the 30's (one in like 1931, the other later in the same decade), so that makes them either young children or babies during WWII. So I kinda have both sides: the ones old enough to be teens during the era, and the ones WAY too young to be snogging during the era.


message 15: by Iset (new)

Iset LOL. Nice turn of phrase, that last sentence.

Your family must have had a fast turnover, for you to have grandmothers born in the 30s and yet you're older than me. My parents' generation was the 50's... which sounds bloody weird to say seeing as how we're in 2012 now... 2012 and parents born in the 50's... Yep. One of my aunts was a fast turn around and she is already a grandmother to children below 10 years old, but on the other hand my parents and my other aunt had children quite late, so they're, well, my age, and 16 (!). You know what I've often found a weird thought in this day and age, is that, what with teenage pregnancies and all, you get some people who are grandmothers at age 30... GREAT-grandmothers at age 45... and GREAT-GREAT-grandmothers at age 60. Yikes. If you continue with a 15 year turnover model and the oldest member, say, has the luck to reach 90 years old, she, or he, could potentially be a great-great-great-great grandparent.

As for World War soldiers, heck, in both WWI and WWII my family is so awash with soldiers - from almost every single branch of my tree - that I won't go into it, frankly, it'd take too long.


Crystal Starr Light Isis wrote: "LOL. Nice turn of phrase, that last sentence.

Your family must have had a fast turnover, for you to have grandmothers born in the 30s and yet you're older than me. My parents' generation was the 5..."


Thank you! I couldn't help myself :D

My grandparents I think were slow to have kids--my parents were born in the late 1950's and early 1960's. But my parents were the fast turn around link. My mom wasn't yet 20 when I was born!

A grandparent at 30 and a great-grandparent at 45?! Yikes! Completely possible, though. That would be so weird...I never knew my great-grandparents (though one was apparently alive when I was a baby), and one of my grandfathers died before I was even born. I wonder what it would be like for the families in such a case. Would there be less of a generational gap between parents and children, between grandparents and grandchildren?


message 17: by Iset (new)

Iset Geez... I just read a story online about the youngest grandparents in this country being just 29 years old, and in fact when the grandfather tried to visit his brand new granddaughter at the hospital, staff asked him for his ID as they thought he was too young to even be the FATHER, let alone the grandfather.


Kaitlin Monier Crystal Starr Light wrote: "Kaitlin wrote: "My grandparents were both involved in WWII, and their youngest grandchildren are 16...."

I would have thought a 16 year old in 2011 having a grandparent that was a child in WWII wo..."


I do agree with you, though; the age thing is a stretch. My grandparents had a lot of kids-- many were late in life babies who went on to have late in life babies. It's possible, but unlikely.

Also, on the topic of Jacob's character, he annoyed me, too, with how disrespectful he was, especially at his job! And him trying to be fired was ridiculous! Just quit and find another job! But I excused his immaturity for the time being because I thought his character would grow, and this whole trying-to-get-fired charade was to show how immature he was at the beginning and to compare it to his character at the end, which I was hoping would be more mature. I'm not so sure he matured that much though. His character just got really boring. I don't know-- is it just me or were the fight sequences at the end not exciting at all?


Crystal Starr Light Kaitlin wrote: "Also, on the topic of Jacob's character, he annoyed me, too, with how disrespectful he was, especially at his job!"

You are so right! If Riggs highlighted Jacob's immaturity and had Jacob realize towards the end that his behavior was childish, then maybe it wouldn't have been so bad. I know for me, I felt like the author was trying to convince me how self-aware, smart, and mature Jacob was, but Jacob's behavior didn't match up.

Kaitlin wrote: "I don't know-- is it just me or were the fight sequences at the end not exciting at all? "

Me too!! I was really bored during the big fight scene; I really had no investment in the characters and wasn't worried to see if they would make it out okay. In fact, I think I skimmed over a lot of it, because it just didn't interest me.


Kaitlin Monier I honestly just wanted to finish the book already! I will most likely not be reading the sequel.


Trendhater73: S. Bledsoe I noticed a lot of 2 star reviews and was curious to see what people didn't like about this book. I actually really loved it, but I'm not here to argue! I promise :) Your review was really well written and though I disagree with some of it, I can see your point and understand where you are coming from.
My grandparents were old enough to serve in WWII. My dad was from the Vietnam generation, but did not serve. His brother, who is a year older, did though. The families on both sides are very large and I have a lot of teenage cousins, through my younger aunts and uncles who are in their early to late 40s. Therefore, it is possible for Jacob to have a grandparent who was a WWII vet. In a couple of years though, that will not be the case. Maybe then it will move into grandparents as Vietnam vets.
As for how he acts, I work in the ghetto. In a high school. With children who are mostly living in the projects and many of them are gang members. They are mostly arrogant, entitled, whiny a$%h*les. You wouldn't think so, but it is a generational thing. When I worked in a middle class high school the year before, it was the same. They are more concerned with having sex, doing drugs, and falling in love than they are with their futures. Which is why 80% of the kids at my high school are failing all of their classes and I am powerless to make them care. Maybe some day they will wake up and stop their moaning.


Crystal Starr Light Trendhater73 wrote: "I noticed a lot of 2 star reviews and was curious to see what people didn't like about this book. I actually really loved it, but I'm not here to argue! I promise :) Your review was really well wri..."

Thank you for taking the time to read my review and to comment!

I didn't realize, before writing this review, how many people still have grandparents who were old enough to serve in WWII, particularly people who were teenagers. I knew it was theoretically possible, but as for actual? Well, I guess I am wrong! Though I still will look forward to the time where we can explore different conflicts, instead of the same ones from WWII.

As for teenaged behavior...well, I'll be the first to admit I don't have first-hand contact with teenagers nowadays, so I won't contest that Jacob's behavior is similar. I still didn't like his character, and while I don't have to love a character in order to like a book, he didn't seem to grow or change that much, though I know that could come in later novels.

While I didn't like the book, I am really glad you did and thank you for taking the time to share your ideas with me.


message 23: by Anna (new) - rated it 2 stars

Anna AMEN


Lauren Even if I disagree (i thought the book was better than how you described it) the review was quite spot on. The book was defiantly not what i expected like you. it was disappointing. But the real reason i commented on this was that the review was spot on. your writing was awesome and amusing. I'd say you could be a writer if you wanted to. keep that humor in and you could totally write. The moment i started reading your comment i was sucked in and just kept reading. It was awesome. so anyway...yah.


Crystal Starr Light Lauren wrote: "Even if I disagree (i thought the book was better than how you described it) the review was quite spot on. The book was defiantly not what i expected like you. it was disappointing. But the real re..."

Thank you for reading my review and commenting!!

I had heard some iffy things about this book, but I was hoping that it would be good. It was disappointing when the book turned out not to be what I expected. (I am glad you liked it better than me.)

Thank you for your kind words about my writing! I would love to get a job as either a writer or a professional reviewer. Who knows what the future will hold?


message 26: by Danyiele (new) - added it

Danyiele Kibby *sigh* i was looking forward to this but oh well


message 27: by Kimberley (new)

Kimberley I was born in '69 and the only way I could have a 16 YO grandchild would be if I had a baby when I was 11 and they had a baby when they were 16.


Crystal Starr Light Kimberley wrote: "I was born in '69 and the only way I could have a 16 YO grandchild would be if I had a baby when I was 11 and they had a baby when they were 16."

Good point; it wouldn't be very likely to have a 16 year old boy with grandparents born in the 60's/70's. I'll remove that from my review.


message 29: by Kimberley (new)

Kimberley Thank you. I guess it's possible, but not very likely.


message 30: by Kwoomac (new)

Kwoomac John Greene and Ransom Riggs were friends in college.


Crystal Starr Light Kwoomac wrote: "John Greene and Ransom Riggs were friends in college."

That would explain the John Green endorsement, along with how much Jacob felt like a John Green main character (I'm thinking Quentin from "Paper Towns", because that has been the only Green novel I've read).


message 32: by Kate (new) - added it

Kate You put way too much time into this review. It's just a fun book for kids. And plenty of women/girls like Star Wars, Star Trek, Lord of the Rings, etc for more than the lovey scenes. I do and I have since the age of 10 or younger.


message 33: by Kate (new) - added it

Kate Also I should add, for someone complaining about spoilt and pretentious characters, the term "gales of laughter" doesn't help your case. And plenty of people have had children in their mid to late teens for decades. Teen Mom is not a new sensation, just because the TV show is. :| There is just so much wrong with this review that I now WANT to read this book.


message 34: by Crystal Starr Light (last edited Jun 19, 2012 03:34PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Crystal Starr Light Kate wrote: "You put way too much time into this review. It's just a fun book for kids. And plenty of women/girls like Star Wars, Star Trek, Lord of the Rings, etc for more than the lovey scenes. I do and I hav..."

I think even fun books for kids should have some quality to them. I also love Star Wars and Lord of the Rings for more than the lovey dovey scenes--which is why I was so sad to see this book resort to using a romance.

As for how much time I put into a review, well, frankly, I felt strongly about the book. I wanted to specify what I didn't like about it. It moved me that much. And since it's my time to waste, who cares if I spend it writing a review or watching junk TV or surfing the Net?

Kate wrote: "Also I should add, for someone complaining about spoilt and pretentious characters, the term "gales of laughter" doesn't help your case."

So, putting "gales of laughter" makes me pretentious? News to me.

Kate wrote: "There is just so much wrong with this review"

How can an opinion be wrong? Sure, you may like the book more than me, but that doesn't make your liking of the book more correct or less correct than mine.

On a brighter note, thanks for reading my review.


message 35: by Kate (new) - added it

Kate It worries me that you took even more time to reply to this.

I've never read the book anyway. I just found it hilarious.


Crystal Starr Light Kate wrote: "It worries me that you took even more time to reply to this.

I've never read the book anyway. I just found it hilarious."


Uh, again, why? My time is my own to use as I choose. I personally enjoy interacting with those who read my reviews--even those who disagree with my opinions.

If you do read the book, it would be interesting to compare how you felt about the book with how I felt.


Jennifer I happen to agree with your review! Glad someone else typed it out so I didn't have to, lol. The book was not creepy at all! I was, of course, attracted first by the picture on the book cover and highly let down by the actual content. I had to make myself finish the book. Nothing was ever fully explained. The romance between Jacob and Emma was, at best, awkward. I think that was the most creepy thing about the book!
I also noticed that someone made a comment on your review referencing the book as "just a fun book for kids". I don't actually know any "kid" who would read that book, nor do I think that the book's target audience is children...Just saying..


Crystal Starr Light Jennifer wrote: "I happen to agree with your review! Glad someone else typed it out so I didn't have to, lol. The book was not creepy at all! I was, of course, attracted first by the picture on the book cover and h..."

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment!

I was so disappointed; I looked at the pictures and very much wanted it to be a creepy book. I think I spent most of the last few hundred pages skimming because I was so bored with the story and frustrated.

I know everyone likes different things, but I just don't like this book (and I don't think I would have liked it had I been a teenager--and I would have liked some STRANGE things as a teen!). I too am unsure who the target audience is (seems a bit childish for teenagers/adults, and a bit too grownup for kiddies).


Cristy I enjoyed this book immensely, but I did not think it was meant to be a scary book, so I wasn't disappointed when it wasn't. I also don't assume that every main character is meant to be likable, so again, I wasn't disappointed when Jacob wasn't.


Crystal Starr Light Cristy wrote: "I enjoyed this book immensely, but I did not think it was meant to be a scary book, so I wasn't disappointed when it wasn't. I also don't assume that every main character is meant to be likable, s..."

I got the impression from the book blurb that the book would be scary, but I had read reviews that suggested the book wasn't in fact scary.

I also realize that not every main character can and should be likeable. The one example I always give is Scarlett O'Hara from "Gone with the Wind". I didn't really like Scarlett at all, but I was still very interested in where her story ended up. Jacob just rubbed me the wrong way, and I never felt really invested or interested in where his story was going.

I am glad you enjoyed the book however; thank you for sharing your thoughts!


Cristy Yes I see what you mean; I have definitely read books where I have not really cared what happened to the characters. I think in this case I wasn't really that interested in Jacob either, but I did want to know Abe's story.


Crystal Starr Light Cristy wrote: "Yes I see what you mean; I have definitely read books where I have not really cared what happened to the characters. I think in this case I wasn't really that interested in Jacob either, but I did..."

Abe did have a really interesting story; I actually did enjoy the Prologue quite a bit and was sort of hoping that tone would carry through the novel. It would have been cool to have Jacob team up with his grandfather as well (though, of course, there wouldn't really have been a mystery for Jacob to solve--at least not the same one that this story tells).


Paulina Hahaha, loved this. I am always too lazy to write reviews like yours but i completely agree! *copy and paste* :)


Crystal Starr Light Paulina wrote: "Hahaha, loved this. I am always too lazy to write reviews like yours but i completely agree! *copy and paste* :)"

Aw, thank you!!


Kamaria Simone I think that you just judged it by its cover, the back clearly says Mysterious. Not scary.


message 46: by Crystal Starr Light (last edited Jul 17, 2012 12:41PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Crystal Starr Light Kamaria wrote: "I think that you just judged it by its cover, the back clearly says Mysterious. Not scary."

Some mysteries can be scary. Even so, as a mystery, I didn't like the book. Glad you did.


message 47: by Jake (last edited Jul 17, 2012 01:41PM) (new)

Jake Hi Crystal,

I really like your reflections of books. Similar to you, I can't stand protagonists that suck, and from how you painted this 'hero,' he sounds like a real jerk. (There was a different word I wanted to use, but 'Jerk' will work in its stead.) By your reflections, I would be willing to bet money that you would enjoy my novel, but I'd rather you find it by your own efforts and love it/hate it by your own volition.

Cheers,

Jake


Crystal Starr Light Jake wrote: "I really like your reflections of books. Similar to you, I can't stand protagonists that suck, and from how you painted this 'hero,' he sounds like a real jerk. (There was a different word I wanted to use, but 'Jerk' will work in its stead.) By your reflections, I would be willing to bet money that you would enjoy my novel, but I'd rather you find it by your own efforts and love it/hate it by your own volition."

Thank you for your kind words. I was really sad that Jacob became such a--frustrating protagonist. In the Prologue, I actually liked him. But as the novel progressed, we had, as you may say, a "falling out". And I can become invested in protagonists I don't love, but I couldn't muster any interest in Jacob's life :(

No promises, but I'll have to investigate your book and see if it is something I would like.


message 49: by Jake (new)

Jake Crystal Starr Light wrote: "Jake wrote: "I really like your reflections of books. Similar to you, I can't stand protagonists that suck, and from how you painted this 'hero,' he sounds like a real jerk. (There was a different ..."

I've been trying to read stories from authors with small label publishers since they tend to be middle-class writers. A) They did get a publisher, so the quality of writing and editing is generally better that self-published books. B) small press authors tend to be a little more daring than big press authors since the big houses are afraid of controversy.


Lauren Avery I too was sucked in by the creepy cover and blurb on the back.. bit if a disappointment, and VERY abrupt ending!


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