Ronyell's Reviews > Marvel Masterworks: The Uncanny X-Men, Vol. 2

Marvel Masterworks by Chris Claremont
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Flashback:

After reading the first volume of “Uncanny X-Men,” I just could not wait to read the second volume of “The Uncanny X-Men” featuring the second generation X-Men! This time, the X-Men are up against even deadlier foes than before and they will have to fight harder then ever before!

What is the story?

Continuing from the first volume after Jean Grey seemingly sacrifices her life to save the X-Men in space, it turns out that Jean Grey has become the Phoenix! Oh, and not only that but the X-Men come across new villains such as Juggernaut, Black Tom Cassidy and Magneto!! Can the X-Men defeat these new and more dangerous villains? Read this volume to find out!

What I liked about this book:

Chris Claremont's writing: Chris Claremont has done it again in this second volume and this time, he gives the X-Men more character and back stories than the first volume. Chris Claremont made each character much more interesting, especially Storm since I never knew before that Storm had claustrophobia that resulted from her turbulent childhood. Also, I loved the way that Chris Claremont made the characters interact with each other in interesting ways, especially between Storm and Colossus as they relate to each other about their homelands (Storm missing Africa and Colossus missing Russia) and I also loved the growing loving relationship between Banshee and Moira MacTaggart as this was one of the few relationships I have seen in the X-Men universe besides Cyclops and Jean Grey’s relationship. Chris Claremont also did an excellent job at making this volume extremely dramatic and exciting at the same time as the X-Men have to face tougher foes than ever before.

John Byrne's illustrations: I just loved John Byrne’s illustrations in this comic book! As usual, it is done in an old school style that reminiscent the 70s since this comic was created during the 70s and I enjoyed seeing the original styles of the second generation X-Men including Wolverine, Colossus, Storm, Nightcrawler and Banshee. I also loved the way that John Byrne draws the X-Men’s shocked expressions as they are fighting various villains throughout this volume and it truly made the characters truly realistic to look at.

What made me feel uncomfortable about this comic:

Even though I did not have a problem with this book, probably the only problem that younger “X-Men” readers might have with this volume is that the illustrations might be too old fashioned for younger readers since this comic was made during the 70s. Also, there is so much dialogue among the characters in this volume that younger fans of “X-Men” might not understand the dialogue going on between the characters. Also, when villains like Magneto and Juggernaut were introduced, there did not seem to be enough character development with them since they were just introduced out of the blue and there was no back story being told about these characters.

Final Thoughts:

Overall, “The Uncanny X-Men Volume Two” is a truly brilliant sequel to the first volume and I definitely cannot wait to read the next volume of the “The Uncanny X-Men” and learn more about the X-Men franchise!

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog
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Comments (showing 1-12 of 12) (12 new)

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message 1: by Scott (new)

Scott Aw, I think you're not giving kids enough credit. I got into the Claremont-Byrne X-Men when I was 7 or 8 and loved it. I know education isn't what it was, but if you challenge them from an early age they'll pick it up. Anyway, glad you liked it; these are some of the best comics ever made.


Ronyell Scott wrote: "Aw, I think you're not giving kids enough credit. I got into the Claremont-Byrne X-Men when I was 7 or 8 and loved it. I know education isn't what it was, but if you challenge them from an early ..."

Thanks! I guess I wasn't really thinking about how you can really challenge little kids into reading this material. :( But, you could like have it set where the little kids could compare and contrast between the narrative styles of the current comics and the older comics and see how much they had changed over the years.


message 3: by Travis (new)

Travis I've got to agree with Scott, this was the team I started with and I've always found the older stuff to be much more new reader friendly then later versions.
I'd much rather have a kid read these issues, where the focus is on fighting the bad guys then current stuff where Scott is cheating on his wife and we get to see Wolverine cutting loose in all it's bloody detail.


Ronyell Travis wrote: "I've got to agree with Scott, this was the team I started with and I've always found the older stuff to be much more new reader friendly then later versions.
I'd much rather have a kid read these i..."


I guess I was assuming that the current generation might have a hard time with reading the older issues of the X-Men or any other comic from the 70s since the narrative is a bit too lengthy and it all depends on what comics they grew up with. But, I agree that the narrative in the older comics are a lot more reader friendly than the newer comics because at least the older comics explain to the readers about what happened previously so that way readers can keep up with whatever is happening in the stories.


message 5: by Scott (new)

Scott The trick is to get them to read these books first. :)


message 6: by Travis (new)

Travis Ronyell wrote: "Travis wrote: "I've got to agree with Scott, this was the team I started with and I've always found the older stuff to be much more new reader friendly then later versions.
I'd much rather have a k..."



The older stuff is a different writing style, but it's the subject matter that will be the hook to get the kids to read them.
Sure, there's big words, but there's also super heroes fighting dinosaurs.
Beats Twilight.


Ronyell Scott wrote: "The trick is to get them to read these books first. :)"

Oh yeah! What would convince them to read a comic like this? Well, it's got action and superheroes, so that's a good start! :D

Travis wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "Travis wrote: "I've got to agree with Scott, this was the team I started with and I've always found the older stuff to be much more new reader friendly then later versions.
I'd much..."


Exactly! I think that kids would still be interested as long as there's action and superheroes in the story!


message 8: by Travis (new)

Travis Ronyell wrote: "Scott wrote: "The trick is to get them to read these books first. :)"

Oh yeah! What would convince them to read a comic like this? Well, it's got action and superheroes, so that's a good start! :..."


The cool stuff is a hook and then you make sure to be around to help them with new words or to talk about things/ideas in the story they don't understand.

It's how I got my amazingly well developed vocabulary and how I got my kids to be readers.


Ronyell Travis wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "Scott wrote: "The trick is to get them to read these books first. :)"

Oh yeah! What would convince them to read a comic like this? Well, it's got action and superheroes, so that's..."


Yeah, I would definitely be there to teach kids who are interested in reading the older comics about what the stories are all about and to go over some tough vocabulary with this. These comics would actually be a good reading tool for younger children.


message 10: by Scott (new)

Scott Oh, I learnt countless words from reading comics when I was a kid, possibly more than I did from books. I was good at figuring them out from context, so I rarely had to look anything up.

When my best friend's daughter gets old enough to read comics, I plan to give her some of the best stuff from my youth; that way it's (hopefully) the first she sees.


Ronyell Scott wrote: "Oh, I learnt countless words from reading comics when I was a kid, possibly more than I did from books. I was good at figuring them out from context, so I rarely had to look anything up.

When my ..."


I would definitely recommend these earlier X-Men stories (and Joss Whedon's run on Astonishing X-Men). They were fantastic!


message 12: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Scott wrote: "Oh, I learnt countless words from reading comics when I was a kid, possibly more than I did from books. I was good at figuring them out from context, so I rarely had to look anything up."

Me, too! including auto-da-fe, which I otherwise probably wouldn't have encountered till college history class.


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