Wendi's Reviews > The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
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Sep 28, 11

Read in September, 2011

I am a pretty blessed person. One of the blessings I have is friends who love to read. Half the books I read I wouldn't have read without the suggestion of my friends.

My Long Distance BFF, Tina, suggested The Hunger Games to me; and I think it's her best suggestion so far. I immediately fell into this story. I had a very, very hard time putting this book down. It is, hands down, everything that Stephenie Meyers wishes her books (all of them) could be.

The characters, the setting, the plot, it's all so good, so real, so possible. It's a mix of "Logan's Run", "Brave New World", and "The Handmaid's Tale".

I don't think my review of this book will be very good. I'm still digesting it's goodness after two days; not to mention that I've started reading book two in the series and it's JUST as good! Let me try to scale it down some.

1. I really like the character of Katniss, the lead and protagonist of the story. My boss said the she thinks Katniss is an anti-hero, but I'm not so sure. A reluctant hero, yes, but maybe not an anti-hero.

Katniss is 16 but her angst isn't regular teenage angst. It's mature before her time angst. Even though her mom is the town healer, Katniss is the adult in the small family that includes her mom and little sister Prim. Katniss is smart. She's street smart, she's a hunter. She is responsible. She doesn't go from smart girl to mushy girl because a boy gives her the eye. She doesn't understand her emotions when she is faced with love. But it doesn't undo her.

Katniss is her own hero, whether she realizes it or not.

2. The Districts and the Government are very possible. Before the end of the Cold War, we saw what the communist government in Russia and surrounding countries did to the people. We see what is happening in Libya, Greece, Egypt, Iran, and North Korea the way the government can control the lives of the people. There is not just a divide between those who have and those who have not, it is a gulf. Food is scarce. Jobs are not just jobs but almost indentured servitude. The government controls the media and communication. Marshall law is power. Sound familiar? Not just fiction, but happening today.

3. The idea that the winners of the games suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - The character Haymitch is a drunk who has no family and no friends. He's a former victor of the games and has had to spend the years following his turn through the games mentoring kids - all of whom died in the games. How could someone not be scarred by that. It's not glossed over, Haymitch is a central character and his issues are real.

Something I was thinking about today - Katniss almost seems like a Moses character with Peeta being Aaron. In the Bible, God calls Moses to save the people in Egypt. But Moses tells God that he is afraid to be the speaker of God's word to the people, to lead them and instruct them. But God says that Moses has a brother, Aaron, who can do that for him. Katniss and Peeta are similar. Katniss has the power and Peeta has the words. I wonder if I'm reading too much into the story, but parts of the book - especially when the characters are in the arena - remind me much of "Lord of the Flies" whose characters were heavily compared to people in the Bible.

Regardless, the book is marvelously written. The characters, the different Districts, the Capitol, the people in the different areas - it's all thought out so well and executed to perfection. The Districts themselves feel like characters.

This is a book I suggest to anyone who likes to read - flat out, if you like to read then you absolutely must read this book. I hope that it will become a classic some day.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Paul I like the sound of that! I have just started it!


Paul Oh, and hi! :-)


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