Aviva's Reviews > The Kommandant's Mistress

The Kommandant's Mistress by Sherri Szeman
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Aug 26, 11


This book confused me. I wanted to see how this writer managed to deal with this kind of relationship. Well, mainly she didn't. The book is told in two perspectives. The first half is the Kommandant's told in flashback after the war (he's on the run as a war criminal) and the second half is the mistress's, also told in flashback after the war. The two halves are so distinctly different that it's almost like they're remembering totally separate events. Also, and interestingly enough, I felt the author was trying to pack in a little too much information. In her quest to be sure that we the reader didn't sympathize with the Kommandant at all she had him doing things that just didn't mesh with the character. I mean...if a man loves a woman so much he's willing to carve things into his own skin, to house that woman with his family against the express wishes of his wife, to chance public humiliation because this woman is off limits to him, then I don't really see that man giving said woman to his best friend simply because it's his best friend's birthday, you know? Little inconsistencies like that made this book an interesting read, but not a particularly good one.

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Comments (showing 1-6 of 6) (6 new)

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I actually just finished this book the other day, but it never (to me) seemed like "love" as it did this weird obsession of his. And they didn't really phrase things as "BDSM out of control" back than, so ... Eh. I just didn't see the love aspect. But that's just me. :) Happy Reading!


Aviva Augmented Fraggle wrote: "I actually just finished this book the other day, but it never (to me) seemed like "love" as it did this weird obsession of his. And they didn't really phrase things as "BDSM out of control" back t..."

That was my point, actually. It wasn't love even if the character believed it to be and the author didn't explore that enough.


message 3: by [deleted user] (last edited May 07, 2012 10:17AM) (new)

Scarlett.speaks wrote: "Augmented Fraggle wrote: "I actually just finished this book the other day, but it never (to me) seemed like "love" as it did this weird obsession of his. And they didn't really phrase things as "B..."

Ah. ok. I read the newer ebook version of this and she put in a bunch of extras, explanations and she goes on to address the idea of "love" and the position of women who were raped in that time (everyone blame the victim despite her being an inmate as well). Human rationalization can be a disturbing thing.

*ed- I agree with you that in the story it wasn't really gone into much.


Aviva Augmented Fraggle wrote: "Scarlett.speaks wrote: "Augmented Fraggle wrote: "I actually just finished this book the other day, but it never (to me) seemed like "love" as it did this weird obsession of his. And they didn't re..."

Ha. I really hate it when authors go back and "explain" or add extras or whatever to the work. I feel like the work should speak for itself. If it wasn't clear in her original draft, then it wasn't clear. Period. The reader can draw their own conclusions (my conclusion being she should have done better, but I'm crazy judgey). But going back after the fact is a little like cheating.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

haha, it is a bit. I think I probably would have enjoyed the book more if I hadn't read the extras. (view spoiler)


Alexandria Dear Augmented Fraggle and Scarlett.Speaks:
It's weird how many people over the years have tried to convince me that Max and Rachel do, indeed, love each other. I guess everyone reads into it what they want. I always tell them that, if Max and Rachel do have feelings of any kind for each other, both would be horrified to hear it called "love".
Good reading,
Alexandria


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