Lindsey's Reviews > The Wicked Games of a Gentleman

The Wicked Games of a Gentleman by Jillian Hunter
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Aug 23, 2011

really liked it


This is a fun read that is largely free of the more annoying tropes and clichés that can plague the historical romance shelf.

The heroine, Eloise Goodwin, has escaped a scandalous past by leaving her small village behind and becoming a companion in London. Her charge is troublesome and beautiful and an unrepentant trollop (as young charges are wont to be), which forces the heroine into the company of Drake, one of the infamous Boscastle brothers.

These circumstances allow two people from different circles to stay connected without feeling contrived or forced. Both the hero and heroine are realistic, mature people who don’t engage in unnecessary theatrics or drama. I like that they acknowledge their attraction to each other early on and don’t mind acting on it, and there isn’t a lot of needless guilt or shame about it.

**SPOILER ALERT** I also appreciate that Eloise is not offended by Boscastle’s offer to make her his mistress. Most heroines would faint in outrage, but Eloise is a young, poor woman with no connections. She’s sensible, so when a man who makes her happy offers to make her happy in an official capacity, and give her a house to boot, she sees the value in his proposal. It was quite refreshing.

Of course, Eloise does not become Boscastle’s mistress – what sort of happy ending after would that be? – but I dearly enjoyed seeing a rake’s journey from unrepentant sinner to devoted lover. I didn’t give this book more stars because while it was good, and I’ve returned to read it a second time, the spark between the main characters was not quite bright enough to make it “great.” Sensibleness makes for a believable heroine, but maybe it took away from some of the tension for me. I will definitely look at more of Hunter’s work, and look forward to reading about more Boscastles.

This is a fun read that is largely free of the more annoying tropes and clichés that can plague the historical romance shelf.

The heroine, Eloise Goodwin, has escaped a scandalous past by leaving her small village behind and becoming a companion in London. Her charge is troublesome and beautiful and an unrepentant trollop (as young charges are wont to be), which forces the heroine into the company of Drake, one of the infamous Boscastle brothers.

These circumstances allow two people from different circles to stay connected without feeling contrived or forced. Both the hero and heroine are realistic, mature people who don’t engage in unnecessary theatrics or drama. I like that they acknowledge their attraction to each other early on and don’t mind acting on it, and there isn’t a lot of needless guilt or shame about it.

**SPOILER ALERT** I also appreciate that Eloise is not offended by Boscastle’s offer to make her his mistress. Most heroines would faint in outrage, but Eloise is a young, poor woman with no connections. She’s sensible, so when a man who makes her happy offers to make her happy in an official capacity, and give her a house to boot, she sees the value in his proposal. It was quite refreshing.

Of course, Eloise does not become Boscastle’s mistress – what sort of happy ending after would that be? – but I dearly enjoyed seeing a rake’s journey from unrepentant sinner to devoted lover. I didn’t give this book more stars because while it was good, and I’ve returned to read it a second time, the spark between the main characters was not quite bright enough to make it “great.” Sensibleness makes for a believable heroine, but maybe it took away from some of the tension for me. I will definitely look at more of Hunter’s work, and look forward to reading about more Boscastles.
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