Kitrina's Reviews > fathermothergod: My Journey Out of Christian Science

fathermothergod by Lucia Greenhouse
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Aug 21, 11

bookshelves: to-read, memoir


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Comments (showing 1-6 of 6) (6 new)

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message 1: by Andrle (new)

Andrle If you read this, I hope it doesn't completely color your opinion of Christian Science (although I've never really explained anything well enough to make you think of it favorably, I'm sure). This is obviously coming from someone with very bitter connections to the religion. Please know that not all Christian Science families "refuse" medical care to their children. Like in any religion, some people take things to extremes. But it's not the fault of the religion or all the other members... Anyway, I just wanted to say that before you read it. The fact that people write books like this (or about any religion) makes me sad.


message 2: by Kitrina (new) - added it

Kitrina Really? I find these books to be incredibly interesting from a psychological perspective. They are very revealing, not just about the "bad things" about the religion, but the positive aspects as well. These writers who leave religions after belonging to them for years tend to be very apologetic in a way (this is based on the books that I have read; I wouldn't be surprised if there was a minority that this was untrue for). They tend to want the reader to understand that the people who are still in the religion are good people and there are good reasons for them to be there - in spite of the bad parts. There is an over eagerness to be honest about the positives, almost as if they wish to apologize for what has happened.

I actually find such books to be a wonderful way to learn about religions I don't understand. Usually the writer composes the book after they have mainstreamed for a few years, and can explain in a way I can understand what would make the religion appealing to someone not born into it. (When I say "mainstreamed" I should mention that the previous books I have read were about the cult known as "The Family," and fundamentalist Mormons.) They're kinda like cultural translators.

Based on the books I have read, I disagree with the "bitter" comment (though, who knows about this book until I read it). The writers I've read seem to do it as a means of coping with their experiences. It's more about healing, I think. :)

With all of that said, I was nervous about putting it on my to read list because I didn't want to offend you. But I really do want to read it because it reminded me of what your sister told me about her experiences.


message 3: by Andrle (new)

Andrle That makes a lot of sense. I respect that you'd want to read the book, especially from a psychological perspective, or wanting to hear another side of a religion. I guess mostly I was reacting to things like her bio calling her a "refugee" of Christian Science. And it also in some ways makes me feel guilty for many times being terrible at describing or explaining the religion. There have been times when I've been less involved/enthusiastic about it, but I think getting distance and perspective with religion is a good thing. But at those times, I know I've really, quite frankly, sucked at explaining it and why it's so important to me.

I totally didn't mean to make you feel bad about putting it on your to read list! I hope you do read it and enjoy it... and I'll be really interested to hear your feedback!!


message 4: by Kitrina (new) - added it

Kitrina I can understand why your religion is important to you and would only want others to see it in the best light possible. :) Everyone who truly believes should want that for their faith.

To be honest, I kinda glossed over the "refugee" description. It seems a little dramatic given how Christian Scientists are as integrated into the main culture as Catholics, Lutherans, and Atheists. The word seems a little more appropriate for leaving an isolationist group, in my opinion.

Anyway, I promise not to believe any nasty things the author might saw about your religion without... uh... first talking to you about it? ;) Don't feel bad about not being able to explain your religion. I realize now that religions really are sub-cultures. There is so much that is assumed when you grow up in it, it is difficult to explain to outsiders. But, I did learn a lot at your wedding. Some of your friends were able to explain a number of things to me, which I appreciated. :)


message 5: by Andrle (new)

Andrle That's awesome! I'm glad you were able to have conversations with people about it. And... my delay in responding might appear sassy, but I only just saw it today. Goodreads, you should more consistently email me when I have a message please! :P

I'm actually really glad you have this book in your queue now. It will be good to hear what you think of it and how the author writes these things.

OK, on to Laurie Notaro for me. Got it from the library a few weeks ago and am finally starting it today I think... :D

Kitrina wrote: "I can understand why your religion is important to you and would only want others to see it in the best light possible. :) Everyone who truly believes should want that for their faith.

To be hone..."



message 6: by Kitrina (new) - added it

Kitrina Andrle wrote: "That's awesome! I'm glad you were able to have conversations with people about it. And... my delay in responding might appear sassy, but I only just saw it today. Goodreads, you should more consist..."

No worries. The delay in response didn't seem sassy in the slightest. I just assumed you were busy.

Sadly, I don't think I'll be getting to this book for awhile. Work has been depressing, so I've been selecting rather light readings as of late (War & Peace is an exception because it for a book club... and we tend to bring up funny things from it... like how two male characters seem really tooo into each other to have wives...)

I hope you find Ms. Notaro entertaining! Let me know what you think!


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