Cassie's Reviews > Tweak: Growing Up On Methamphetamines

Tweak by Nic Sheff
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May 13, 08

Read in April, 2008

Being that there is drug addiction in my immediate family, my mom has been researching. She's bought videos, watched tv broadcastings, attended NAR-ANON meetings, spoken with drug&alcohol rehabilitation centers...you name it. Coincidentally two books came out recently: one based on a father's telling of dealing with his son's crystal meth addiction and the other one the son tells his story. TWEAK is the son's book and I've begun reading this one first. Within the first 20 pages it becomes obvious how much I don't understand about drug addiction. The extent that people will go to to support their habit and how it consumes every waking thought. Their lives literally revolve around it. It's like their job is getting high and the only reason to have an actual job is to buy drugs. It's what they live for. It's so hard to come to realization that this is what has happened to my family member. Every word out of their mouth is a lie. Being sincere and considerate is like a foreign concept. Although the Nic Sheff, the author and addict, does eventually clean up his life, it's after years upon years and numerous attempts at rehab. The book can be disturbing to read at times and I have to remind myself that it is a true story, but it opens your eyes as to how serious drug addiction really is.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Holly I too have a family member that has an addiction to Crystal Meth and it is amazing to me how much Nic Sheff's experiences parellel the experience of my family member. I think what you said above is so true and they live, breath and die for these drugs. It is a debilitating disease both for the user and the family who loves them.


Colette I read the father's story first, which makes this more tolerable. I cannot fathom being so dependent upon something that destroys your potential as much as drugs.


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