Airiz C's Reviews > Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus

Lucifer, Vol. 7 by Mike Carey
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The complexity of this series is building up, but with Carey you can never really tell if it’s already the zenith or not yet.

The story of Exodus, seventh volume of the Lucifer series, is spun from the last plot-thread hanging at the end of The Mansions of Silence: God has gone from His throne. I don’t know how that can be, but that is clear enough after His vis-à-vis with Lucifer (or sweet, savage Samael, as God prefers to call him) and Michael. The newsbreak produces expected results: “every god, demon, and tooth fairy will want to step into [God’s] shoes.” Lucifer makes his mind to protect Heaven from wannabee-usurpers, so whether he likes it not, he is going to fight alongside the angels.

I can tell that the plot is at its thickest, but I’m anticipating more because that’s just how Carey rolls. Two titans are the first to attempt to snatch the vacant throne, and the damage to the Silver City is nowhere near just scratches. Even Lucifer himself toils at first, until his cunning shines through again to finish off the battle.

There are a lot of behind-kicking moments here, and the one that takes the cake is Mazikeen barging into Heaven to inform Lucifer of the titan’s schemes. She doesn’t give a toss about how all the angels there are shooing her away, being a former denizen of Hell and a daughter of the sinful Lilith. She just marches in with Beatrice, the titans' conduit and an ex-waitress from Lucifer’s nightclub in Los Angeles. There’s a small caterwaul precipitating Mazikeen's entrance, and she makes the best retaliation by committing blasphemy in that holy place: the showcasing of passion. Mazikeen is officially the most badass heroine in these graphic novels yet.

Elaine Belloc follows suit in ranking. In the end of the previous volume she is made the inner guardian of Lucifer’s new cosmos. I like how Carey handled her character, an entity that ricochets between cold logic and childish temperament. In the end of The Mansions of Silence you’d think there’s nothing more to tell of Elaine’s story, but Carey’s being his secretive tale-spinner self, and that fact alone can make a reader go all thirsty for the next issues.

This is unusual for me, but the best story in this volume is the one about Thole the stichglass weaver and the boy Martin. It sounds like a cute dark fairytale, but one that is stained with darker metaphors resonating directly with the reality of love’s complexity. Their story is brief but tightly packed with bittersweet morals. I loved it.
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