Jon Cox's Reviews > Pathfinder

Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card
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Aug 02, 11

bookshelves: fantasy-sci-fi, fiction-serious-adult-stuff
Read in July, 2011

In playing with the tacitly accepted sci-fi genre rules of space and time travel, Card takes a risk. It creates some interesting situations and new ideas, but ultimately, it ends up feeling like he makes it up as he goes along. Of course, this may help the story by creating more of a feeling that the main characters don't know what they are doing and are just stumbling in the darkness trying to find their way with their interesting abilites. So in that way it works. However, the premise that the jump through space created 19 ships with exactly the same people on them, and they all inhabit the same space, but then somehow separate and can be used to colonize 19 different wallfolds on one world is just ludicrous. How did they inhabit the same space without destroying each other? Impossible. How did they then separate to all be in the same dimension but not trying to inhabit the same space? Impossible. Perhaps the tacitly accepted sci-fi genre rules of space and time travel are there for a reason. So although the main story line and Card's writing style, themselves are decent, the basis of the story is faulty, and makes it hard for me to buy into it.

And then there's the ending. The little blurbs at the beginning of each chapter make it clear that the expendables are precise and exacting. Yet at the end, they break their own rule of who they will obey, and this is completely unlike the characteristics of the expendables as Card established them. It's a large oversight that I assume he had to make in order for the comming books to be able to work. I can't really respect that.

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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Mandie Mc How the 19 ships came to occupy 19 different areas of space is explicitly explained both in the book itself and in the acknowledgements section wherein Card gives a brief overview of What the Hell Just Happened for those unable to understand from the shifting viewpoints.


message 2: by Jon (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jon Cox Mandie wrote: "How the 19 ships came to occupy 19 different areas of space is explicitly explained both in the book itself and in the acknowledgements section wherein Card gives a brief overview of What the Hell ..."

Ha. I understood what was going on and what Card wrote as explanations throughout the book and in his acknowledgements, it just didn't work because I don't buy into space and time working like that.


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