Laurel's Reviews > The Perks of Being a Wallflower

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
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Aug 07, 11

bookshelves: ya, contemporary, not-bad-not-bad
Read on August 07, 2011

Is there such thing as 3.75 stars? Can I do that?

Moving on, I feel like I waited too long to read this book. Because I'm already out of the awkward phase of middle/high school. I think that because I hated reading till about junior year of high school (and here I am wanting to be an author?), I got more of a backbone out of school because I had to figure out things for myself. I never went to books for help with that. I didn't want the fact that I'm too old for this book to affect my grade for it.

CALL IT BEING NICE, I STILL ENJOYED IT.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower definitely gave the moments that I don't like about real life. My dad often spoke to me about some students he had in middle school, great kids he had met, and how they thought they had no one to go to. And so they killed themselves. I never understood why people get that feeling. Why do they feel that they have no one? My dad gave me some of the greatest advice that I feel everyone should always know.

"There is never a time where you are alone. There is always someone to talk to."

Sounds simple, but a lot of kids don't know it, or refuse to believe it. I don't know how kids find that killing themselves solves anything. After news stories and movies, why don't they realize that it just makes everyone feel terrible? The world is never better. It gets better when that suicidal someone makes a change in their life. And now, onto Perks.

Charlie as a character was hard to get into. He did things without thinking, something I'm prone to doing, which helped me relate to him, but his crying fits over some conversations pulled me out of his character. I drove myself crazy trying to get to know him. I felt that this was almost on purpose, since Charlie states a number of times that he wants to be 'anonymous'. Overall, I did like the conflict of feelings he had for his family and how he just didn't know how to live his life. I do find that a little off, seeing that I discovered (my personality at least) myself at the end of 8th grade.

The story is about finding out real-life situations and who you are. Perks does a great job in those real-life pickles, but not so far into the identity zone to really get Charlie to his feet and to be himself. It was about him being free and not really being his own person, or maybe it's the same thing and I'm just silly.

Overall, the prose helps me get a feel for Charlie, though some of Charlie's friends didn't come off as their own voice except for Sam. I did enjoy this book, but I felt that I would have enjoyed it more when I was in the awkward stage that Charlie is in. Man, I wish I read more when I was a kid, I really do.
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Quotes Laurel Liked

Stephen Chbosky
“Once on a yellow piece of paper with green lines
he wrote a poem
And he called it "Chops"
because that was the name of his dog

And that's what it was all about
And his teacher gave him an A
and a gold star
And his mother hung it on the kitchen door
and read it to his aunts
That was the year Father Tracy
took all the kids to the zoo

And he let them sing on the bus
And his little sister was born
with tiny toenails and no hair
And his mother and father kissed a lot
And the girl around the corner sent him a
Valentine signed with a row of X's

and he had to ask his father what the X's meant
And his father always tucked him in bed at night
And was always there to do it

Once on a piece of white paper with blue lines
he wrote a poem
And he called it "Autumn"

because that was the name of the season
And that's what it was all about
And his teacher gave him an A
and asked him to write more clearly
And his mother never hung it on the kitchen door
because of its new paint

And the kids told him
that Father Tracy smoked cigars
And left butts on the pews
And sometimes they would burn holes
That was the year his sister got glasses
with thick lenses and black frames
And the girl around the corner laughed

when he asked her to go see Santa Claus
And the kids told him why
his mother and father kissed a lot
And his father never tucked him in bed at night
And his father got mad
when he cried for him to do it.


Once on a paper torn from his notebook
he wrote a poem
And he called it "Innocence: A Question"
because that was the question about his girl
And that's what it was all about
And his professor gave him an A

and a strange steady look
And his mother never hung it on the kitchen door
because he never showed her
That was the year that Father Tracy died
And he forgot how the end
of the Apostle's Creed went

And he caught his sister
making out on the back porch
And his mother and father never kissed
or even talked
And the girl around the corner
wore too much makeup
That made him cough when he kissed her

but he kissed her anyway
because that was the thing to do
And at three a.m. he tucked himself into bed
his father snoring soundly

That's why on the back of a brown paper bag
he tried another poem

And he called it "Absolutely Nothing"
Because that's what it was really all about
And he gave himself an A
and a slash on each damned wrist
And he hung it on the bathroom door
because this time he didn't think

he could reach the kitchen.”
Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower


Reading Progress

08/07/2011 page 100
47.0% "I don't know how to feel right now. This book is good but I can't relate to it."

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