Natalien's Reviews > High-Rise

High-Rise by J.G. Ballard
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Jul 28, 2011

liked it
bookshelves: favorites, crazy, depressing, dystopia, sociology, animals
Read in July, 2011 , read count: 1

Now I know the reason why there are not so many tower blocks in UK (in comparison to Eastern Europe)! I'm not going to tag it as a horror but I'm terrifyingly fascinated that such devolution of humans seems realistic enough to happen especially in an enclosed setting.
The first paragraph is amazing (with the dog). I like the idea that the whole world was functioning as usual but only in the high-rise the society was crumbling. The difficult and long read, nonetheless.

In the Harper Perennial 2006 edition there is also an additional short story by the same author called "The Intensive Care Unit" which I enjoyed very much. Disturbing like the main novel but more satisfactory because executed in a better form. Feels like the present times but with computers and only slightly exaggerated. 4 stars for this one!
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Quotes Natalien Liked

J.G. Ballard
“They thrived on the rapid turnover of acquaintances, the lack of involvement with others, and the total self-sufficiency of lives which, needing nothing, were never dissapointed.”
J.G. Ballard, High-Rise

J.G. Ballard
“However, for all his affection and loyalty towards the animal, the dog would soon be leaving him - they would both be present at a celebratory dinner when they reached the roof, he reflected with a touch of gallows-humour, but the poodle would be in the pot.”
J.G. Ballard, High-Rise

J.G. Ballard
“First she would try to kill him, but failing this give him food and her body, breast-feed him back to a state of childishness and even, perhaps, feel affection for him. Then, the moment he was asleep, cut his throat. The synopsis of the ideal marriage.”
J.G. Ballard, High-Rise

J.G. Ballard
“He methodically basted the dark skin of the Alsatian, which he had stuffed with garlic and herbs.
"One rule in life", he murmured to himself. "If you can smell garlic, everything is all right".”
J.G. Ballard, High-Rise


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