Oco's Reviews > How to Rape a Straight Guy

How to Rape a Straight Guy by Kyle Michel Sullivan
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Oct 23, 11

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First off: this is not m/m. I have it categorized this way in my lists, but only because I don't want to make a category for one or two books. Gay fiction, yes. M/m, no.

Expect minor spoilery below -- if you are a stickler for no hints and complete freshness, you should probably not read this review:

This is a powerful read. Yeah, it's 'smutty', it's explicit, and it is essentially about what the title says. But it is an uncomfortable read (in the best of ways) and the explicit scenes are difficult to get through, combining a titillation of one's most base senses with a profound horror at what is actually happening. To me, one reads this and is horrified with oneself for being able to get through it and empathize with the protagonist, much less find it sexually compelling. It teaches me something about myself...in a cautionary tale sort of way. Exposing the darkness within, that sort of thing. Because although Curt is extreme and majorly fucked up, he is also intelligent and willing to examine himself and accept what he has done. And this invites me to, as well.

At it's heart, this is a 'coming of age' story, where we follow Curt through a process of growth and understanding that some might say comes too late. Or perhaps not. The ending is neither tragic nor happy, but it is satisfying and hopeful and only makes sense.

Not sure all of that makes sense. The short of it: this book is not for everyone. It's not a feel-good story, but it is highly intelligent and brutally honest and emotional. Curt is a marvelously complex and embattled protag. A little work of genius, in my estimation.

I've stopped rating m/m stories just as a matter of policy, but since this book doesn't fall within the 'rating my peers' problem, I'm happy to give it my five-star mark.
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Comments (showing 1-50 of 51) (51 new)


message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I see you gave in.


message 2: by Oco (last edited Jul 23, 2011 10:25PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco The reviews on Amazon and B&N kind of turned me. But looks like it is only available in Kindle and paperback. I use a SONY. But I think I can convert it with Calibre... pondering...

Just looks like the kind of book I love to read (and'd love to be able to write, frankly), seriously messed up characters, disturbing, but in a way that makes you think... not just gratuitous. But then I haven't read it. It could just be porn/garbage. :) One way to find out.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

You can download a Kindle reader for your phone/PC/mac/whatever. So if you can't manage to convert it, you still have options. :)


message 4: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Cool.


message 5: by DL (new)

DL This looks Way too dark for me.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Deanna says Nazca Plains books are pretty bad in her experience. The good kind of bad, where you might enjoy how atrocious they are, but not exactly thought provoking.

You have all been warned. I'm thinking of nominating this for the upcoming drunk group review I am working on setting up. We need something that has this kind of potential. Who knows, it might be good. But if it isn't, it can be enjoyed anyway. :D


message 7: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco *lol* drunk group review?

Yeah, I'd only like this kind of dark if it had something to say besides titillation or even 'bad guy learns his lesson' (which, to me, doesn't count as thoughtful, not really).

Like, in the way that A Clockwork Orange was really freaking dark and violent and disturbing (at least back when I saw it) but man, did it turn my thinking inside out.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

I agree with you in principle, but I'm prepared to take on dark and awful if I can be un-serious about it.

The "drunken group review" thing started as a joke when I read a review from someone who panned one of those trite, awful, historical Scottish bodice rippers. Actually the review amounted to copying her extended drunken comment thread and some of it was pretty damned funny.

Details remain to be worked out.

I need to read A Clockwork Orange. I saw the movie eons ago and remember it being weirdly disturbing, but it'z fuzzy.


message 9: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Mmm. I don't mind experimenting, but I quickly grow a sort of bored/annoyed with dark for dark's sake. Though I get what you mean about unserious, I rarely have the patience for that, always find something else I'd rather do.

To be clear, I meant the movie (Clockwork Orange). I saw the movie before reading the book, and it was well enough done (different feel, but still good) that it left the more lasting memory. Remember having been awed by the book, but I don't have those flashes of memory about it.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Have you read Deconstruction? It gets mixed reviews and would offend a lot of people but I enjoyed it. It sort of fits with M. King's work like Filth. Definitely into the seamier sides of life and varying shades of gray.


message 11: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco No! Neither of them, in fact. Filth looks sort of brainy-stretchy good, Deconstruction looks just plain good. Onit. :)


Boycop I just loved "How to rape... "
The writing style is somewhat unique, first person and rough, but fits the story. Not a book for everyone, but definitely different and not cliché.


message 13: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco It is a great story so far, and I have no reason to believe it won't end great. Something about particular authors, you read them and you just know that you are in good hands. I.e., I'm not particularly expecting a happy ending, but I'm expecting a tight one.

The story is disturbing (I'm a little over half through) but in the best way. Makes you think. Makes you realize that sometimes the only thing separating us from those we love to hate is circumstances and bad luck. I've appreciated that for a while now, but love a story that can really make me *feel* that.

It's a gritty writing style, isn't it?


Boycop Ocotillo wrote: "It's a gritty writing style, isn't it? "
Gritty, but it works well in this case.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

I still have to read this one. I think I balked at the price tag.


message 16: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Yeah, books are getting expensive. This is like buying two of others, but I looked at it as a 'you can buy two lollipops or a full dinner' -- not in the sense of volume, but of reading something 'nutritious' -- if one wants to call being disturbed nutritious... heh.

Still, it was a mind bend, sending me places to think, and that's more than I can say for the vast vast majority of m/m (including my favorites).


Boycop Good review, Eve!
Good to hear that you liked it. And as you put it, it's not m/m or romance, nor for everyone, but definitely gay, hard and smutty. I still think the title is a bit misleading, as this story is about so many other things.
I thought it was awesome and I was totally taken by it (says something about me). I barely ever read through the night, but with this one I did make an exception.


message 18: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 23, 2011 12:17PM) (new)

Eve wrote: "Yeah, books are getting expensive. This is like buying two of others, but I looked at it as a 'you can buy two lollipops or a full dinner' -- not in the sense of volume, but of reading something 'n..."

Boycop said it was really good too. Gritty and thought provoking.

Right now I'm enjoying brain candy. This will have to keep until I need something more substantive, and then it will have to fight for space with some of my more serious reading.

Have you/are you reading "Wicked Gentlemen" for Josh's group? Ginn Hale is a weird read for me. I get sucked into her initial descriptions and storyline, then my interest gradually wanes and by the end of the story I'm pretty much disinterested. I'm trying to see if I can pinpoint why that happens.


message 19: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Boycop wrote: "Good review, Eve!
Good to hear that you liked it. And as you put it, it's not m/m or romance, nor for everyone, but definitely gay, hard and smutty. I still think the title is a bit misleading, a..."


I did a lot, but was not surprised. Knew from the start that it would be well done. Unlike you, I had to put it down. It was a bit like watching a train wreck -- had to cover my eyes, take deep breaths, and then get back to it. So my putting it down was actually a statement of how deeply it got me, not a statement of ennui or boredom.

Kate: I read Wicked Gentlemen a while ago. And funny -- you and I often disagree on reads, but not on this. I actually got bored. I thought it was fine, but I certainly don't have the reactions that others do. Not sure why that is. It's not as if there is something to dislike, just it didn't grip me. Her writing is clearly top-notch... just. :/ I really like her stories in HellCop, but her longs end up a wee bit tedious. Not a lot -- I finish them. But enough that I can't rave.


message 20: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Boycop wrote: "I still think the title is a bit misleading, a..."

Oh. Meant to comment on this. I agree, but think it's a brilliant title anyway. I think it *should* have been misleading. That way, the story socks you between the eyes. The blurb hints at the real story, so it's not as if any reader should truly be shocked, but somehow, to me anyway, the simplicity of the title is a strong counterpoint to the depth of the story, and I liked it for that.

But I'm pretty easy to please about things like that and could probably rationalize the brilliance of another title that you liked better, as well. :)


message 21: by Boycop (last edited Oct 23, 2011 12:43PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Boycop Eve wrote: "Boycop wrote: "I still think the title is a bit misleading, a..."

Oh. Meant to comment on this. I agree, but think it's a brilliant title anyway. I think it *should* have been misleading."


I do agree! The title is absolutely brilliant, but it might turn people off that otherwise might buy the book. It is a shame that it is not more widely read, but I guess it wouldn't be anyway, regardless off The title.


message 22: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Heh. I suspect the natural audience for this book would be pretty small, title or no. It is not an escapist read to fantasy-land, that's for sure. :D


message 23: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Kate, now I'm wanting to reread it (WG) to figure out why. I have a thought -- is the story arc too smooth? Like this gradual climb to the climax instead of toothy structure, with punctuated mini-crises along the way... not sure if I'm making sense there... but a sort of stepwise series of events that get the reader clutching their pearls anxiously...

I'm kind of remembering it that way, but can't be sure. I should figure it out, because that would teach me something about story-telling in general.


message 24: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 23, 2011 03:12PM) (new)

Eve wrote: "Kate, now I'm wanting to reread it (WG) to figure out why. I have a thought -- is the story arc too smooth? Like this gradual climb to the climax instead of toothy structure, with punctuated mini-c..."

That feels almost right, but it's more as if the moments of mini-crises are completely diffused and then forgotten. So they don't build into something bigger and/or they don't foreshadow well enough. For instance Belimai has a past with Sariel which led him to being tortured by the Inquisition. The scars and drug addiction that resulted define a large part of who Belimai currently is. But the scenes where he meets Sariel again have zero tension in them and the two men sort of just agree to get along with their separate lives. I'm left thinking "huh? All that build up and that's what I get?". Same thing with the "resolution" of the investigation Belimai undertakes for Harper. I felt no building of tension or worry, then all of a sudden B. is being attacked by organ harvesting bad guys, is saved at the last moment by Harper's sister and WHAM! that whole part of the story is over with no follow through. Only one throw away line early in the story foreshadows the crime being related to harvesting Prodigal organs in order to utilize their powers, and none of the implications are investigated. So not enough continuity in the building and releasing of tension in the plot. Eventually it's like reading stories in the newspaper and all the little episodes remain distinct and emotionally distant. She does good individual scenes. They don't link together well to make a long story. Same same with the rather undeveloped relationship between the MC's.

Hale's descriptions are gorgeous and carry the narrative, but they aren't enough for me. I have a similar problem with Harper Fox, who's another writer Josh really enjoys but who leaves me cold.

ETA: Many of the pieces I complained about being "dropped" or undeveloped above are picked up again part way through the second story. But by then they'd lost their impact. Like a follow on news story.


message 25: by Oco (last edited Oct 23, 2011 03:49PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Thing is, I don't remember well enough to say. Only flashes of your description are coming back to me, which, frankly, explains something of the problem that I had with it. I just never cared all that much. Not to overstate that though, because I'm bad at remembering details of any stories, even when I like them. Impressions stay with me, however.

Part of this is in what we are used to, I suppose. I was scanning through some of the comments on the discussion over there, and she gets lots of credit from her admirers for creating a moody atmosphere, which, I suppose she does, but not nearly as moody and dark as many fantasy-spectrum writers. Certainly more moody than your standard romance novel though, so maybe that's why it leaves an impression with people who read mostly romance and whodunits? Just a thought.

Yes, there is a difference between writing and story-telling, and for my tastes, she does very well at the first, but not so well at the second. And yeah, I've had the same feelings about Harper Fox, although I will say that I truly did enjoy her first one (Life after Joe). Many of the rest were okay, but her most recent I thought was horrid (clearly Josh and that group didn't...I read that thread long after the discussion was over, and with astonishment, frankly). It really felt like a good editor needed to come in and give her a little clarity -- say, "hon, what are you trying to do here, because it ain't working." Of course, many disagree, so what do I know?

Um. Right. Wrong book. *lol* But I seriously don't like to break up happy parties, so here is the shadow discussion.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Eve wrote: "Um. Right. Wrong book. *lol* But I seriously don't like to break up happy parties, so here is the shadow discussion."

*grin* Yeah, I don't want to play wet blanket either.

The whole discussion of craft and appreciation for good writing qua writing is very dominant in Josh's group. I sometimes think this isn't an entirely good thing, because what writers look for and appreciate in a work isn't what the average reader is going after. If you have all these writers engaged in group think, does it affect the way they write? Do they adopt the assumptions of the group in terms of what is good and what is bad?

I don't mean there is anything wrong with technical discussions of craft. But when Josh says things like Ginn Hale was the first person he encountered in the m/m genre who could outwrite him, my eyes roll. They are both very competent and polished writers, but they are NOT the best story tellers and both of them are inclined to forget early bits and pieces and leave them dangling unused or unexplained. Which I find sloppy.

I'd like to see more discussion of story telling, imagination, creative stretching of boundaries, etc. I think all of those are part of writing well, but I get the feeling that is something that really isn't a part of what interests Josh about writing and consequently isn't discussed among the writers who hang out in his group.


message 27: by Oco (last edited Oct 23, 2011 04:36PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Kate Mc. wrote: "Eve wrote: "Um. Right. Wrong book. *lol* But I seriously don't like to break up happy parties, so here is the shadow discussion."

*grin* Yeah, I don't want to play wet blanket either.

The whol..."


You know, I think you are spot on, except that I'm going to include myself in that. Not that I've given this *tons* of thought, or have framed it in quite this way, but in my writing lately, I've been finding some of the passion leaving, being sacrificed to the god of verisimilitude, or pc, or 'my god I don't want people to make fun of all the angst'. My writing is improving, by leaps and bounds, I think, but something else is getting left behind.

So earlier today, I was thinking about a recent (unnamed) novel which to me reads cliche and overly sweet and the guys are acting like girls soft focus dreams yadayada, and seriously, this book is well-loved because it hits a lot of readers right *there* and maybe her 'arc' or whatever is well-done and here I am feeling superior (not really, but for the sake of the discussion) but she's the one with the sales.

I wonder if, to use a cliche -- writing well ends up being a very brainy sort of activity, requiring the divorce of that silly emotional teenager. Whereas crafting a loved story requires leaving the brain behind a little.

That isn't exactly what you are saying (the dangling plotlines and disconnected arcs are essentially also brainy) but I feel as if there is a connection there. And Josh and other writers with MFA's are losing touch with that. And more importantly to me, *I* am.

It isn't unlike the phenomenon of musical bands putting out one or two great albums then fizzling because that's when they had the un-self-consciousness and passion to say something real.

I'm mixing up a lot of stuff here, I know.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Yep, all that. I had put in, and subsequently taken out, a comment above about Josh and Nichole agreeing that it was all very risky for Ginn to structure WG in two parts and two different voices. That, IMO, is bordering on esoteric minutiae. The sort that can entertain academics for hours, but has very little to do with anything.

That sort of deconstruction absolutely loses the passion and the freshness that keep people coming back for more. The *real* stuff. What's that Hemingway quote? Something to the effect that writing is nothing more than opening a vein and bleeding all over the page? When the tools get in the way of that, it's time to leave them aside.

Your sweetly sentimental story example made me laugh because I was thinking smuttier and my mind was on those books that appeal to the id and not much else, like the latest from a well known author pair. But you know, I'm pretty sure the authors have a blast writing those stories and their fans enjoy reading them.

If I were a writer, that's what I'd want to tap into. Which I know you can do, OBTW. People adore the Violet and the Tom. I know you didn't slave over it, but you definitely captured something there. :)


message 29: by Oco (last edited Oct 23, 2011 05:58PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco What's that Hemingway quote? Something to the effect that writing is nothing more than opening a vein and bleeding all over the page? When the tools get in the way of that, it's time to leave them aside.

Yes, this. That pretty much covers it. I think the real genius in writing is being able to do both, and I think that takes time and practice and a certain courage. Because the minute you bleed all over the page and then let others see it, there will be reader who will mock you, who will call you a whiner, who will call you pretentious or disillusioned or egotistical. You know? Courage.

Violet was not a bleed. It was a lark. It was never meant to say anything deep or reveal anything painful or angsty. So I don't know where it fits into this discussion. It's the silly pop song that I wrote as a break from all of my serious (and boring?) compositions. But okay, maybe it wasn't a bleed, still, it is also true that I didn't agonize over it, but pretty much let it flow onto the page. It was suited to that, an extremely simple premise, uncomplicated by subplots or mysteries or anything else.

Book of New Life is a bleed (a long one that I still keep friends locked because I still think I might try publication if I can get at least a first draft of the third and final book done). And mostly, it seems to bore people. Not enough sex, in part. The things I find interesting overwhelm the readers looking for escape, and underwhelm the readers with experience and taste. :p

ETA: that's not entirely true. It has a solid core of readers who profess to love it. But nothing like Violet or even Esperanza.

So, Hemingway was able to say that because (I think) he had an intuitive grasp of how to tell a story and how to manage words. Perhaps once the tools are like extensions of yourself, you can dispense with thinking about them and get back to the business of bleeding. Isn't it Hemingway that people are fond of pointing out had the vocabulary of a sixth grader or something (meaning, one doesn't have to use big words to pack one hell of a punch).


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

I know Deb (Dlee) likes your sekrit book, so you definitely have some fans.

The Violet and the Tom show me you have the spark to reach people and connect to them with your story telling, perhaps even more so when you aren't struggling for it. Maybe it's ease you should be aiming for instead of *meaningful*. All of the deep thoughts are there: cultural assumptions, how they shape us or trap us. That story can be read for more than just surface enjoyment. It all came out while you weren't watching. lol.

I liked Esperanza better, but they are both enjoyable to read and have enough meat not to feel like pure fluff.

re Hemingway. He was the first person to write in that very minimalist fashion. Part of his point had to be that too close an adherence to "how things should be done" stifles your creative voice. You're probably right that you need to know what the tools are for before you abandon them, but the trick is not letting them turn into cages before you can get out.

Okay enough with the zennish kind of abstract stuff!!


message 31: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco rethinking, rereading, and realizing that I'm muddying things a lot, conflating lots of different issues. Bleed does not necessarily correlate with 'what readers want', though maybe it is one of those necessary but not sufficient things... simple is good, and a willingness to look silly. :)


message 32: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco oops, was writing that last one right as you responded.

But yeah. Enough. Think my brain is hurting. Heh.


message 33: by A.B. (new) - rated it 5 stars

A.B. Gayle Glad you enjoyed "How to Rape a Straight Guy" Eve and you and Kate made some interesting comments above on balancing craft with "freshness".

"Wicked Gentlemen" is one I picked up and enjoyed the start, but ended up skip reading (mainly due to lack of time). I should give it another go.

I totally agree also about "Life After Joe" loved that book. Driftwood was okay but didn't grab me as much. Perhaps it has a lot to do with a character's "voice".


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

LOL. Late to the party again, Alison! You'll just have to get up earlier/stay up later.

I haven't read 'Life After Joe'. After 'Driftwood' and 'Nine lights over Edinburgh' I didn't want to.


message 35: by A.B. (new) - rated it 5 stars

A.B. Gayle "Life After Joe" is much better than Driftwood. It felt more real, somehow. The guy's bitterness just jumps off the first few pages.


message 36: by Oco (last edited Oct 27, 2011 06:22PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Hiya. I'm always late, too, unless I'm throwing the party. And even then sometimes I get stuck in the kitchen for long stretches. :p

I was just looking over the list of her books, and my likes/dislikes don't really jive much with average ratings. I liked Life after Joe a lot. Even read it twice. Then read Driftwood and liked it okay, but not as much. I'd forgotten about 'Nine Lights' and I buck the trend there, because I liked it. It had problems (I agree with Kaje's review) but I overall liked the tone and the fact that the protag was such a fuckup. To me, he was sympathetic, I could put a face on him, and that made all the difference. "Midwinter Prince" bored me, Salisbury Key was okay, but had annoying tendencies, and "Last Line", by the time it ended, had me wanting to throw the book across the room.

I think that she is trying to blend fantasy/paranormal elements into some of her books (Salisbury Key, Last Line), going for this hybrid woo-woo effect. But it doesn't end up reading that way to me. What I read is an author who can't decide what it's going to be, or is trying to hide information from me but doing it clumsily. So I spent the whole book (Last Line) going, "Is this paranormal? No. Oh wait, maybe. Uh, no. Okay, NO. WTF? Yes? Or what?" Ugh. And the ending. Erggggg... It's like she threw a lot of 'rules' about writing out the window -- rules that exist for a good reason. Things like not introducing several shocking new ideas in the last three pages.

And erm. Wasn't Curt an absolutely awesome anti-hero??? *grin*


message 37: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco A.B. wrote: ""Life After Joe" is much better than Driftwood. It felt more real, somehow. The guy's bitterness just jumps off the first few pages."

I agree with that. Describes it well. I thought Nine Lights captured that, too, although a bit differently.


message 38: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Oh. And one thing--she catches a lot of hell for being 'verbose' and prose-y, but I have to say that I like that about her writing. Every once in a while it goes over the top and gets self-conscious (a good editor could help with that I bet), but I like it better than the current minimalist style of writing that makes up most m/m.

Juicy and flavorful.


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

"Nine Lights" didn't work for me on any level. The fuck up protagonist was so convinced of his own worthlessness that he felt too broken for anyone to engage with. Made the mood of the whole thing dismal. The bitch boss was OTT for me, along with the offered BJ from the concerned straight coworker and the Israeli security guy was too undeveloped.


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Eve wrote: "Juicy and flavorful."

LMAO. She does great metaphors. I like some of the things she decorates with, I just don't like the cookie underneath. ;)


message 41: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Yeah, can't entirely disagree with any of that. And element of insta-love in there, too. But the dismality (word? *lol*) of the setting worked for me.


message 42: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Kate Mc. wrote: "Eve wrote: "Juicy and flavorful."

LMAO. She does great metaphors. I like some of the things she decorates with, I just don't like the cookie underneath. ;)"


Well put. I'd say I like the decorating and the finishing, but the framing of the house was slipshod. METAPHORS!! Or similes, you know. Whatever.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Eve wrote: "Yeah, can't entirely disagree with any of that. And element of insta-love in there, too. But the dismality (word? *lol*) of the setting worked for me."

LOL. Neologisms R Us.

Works for me.


message 44: by A.B. (last edited Oct 27, 2011 07:01PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

A.B. Gayle Goes to look up "neologisms" in dictionary.
But seriously guys, this archetype. The self-loathing or at least modest style of hero is a great one to play with.
It suits a drag queen character as there is a release for the bitchiness there, but think of books where they have been. Josh Lanyon's "Just Desserts" comes to mind.
Ridge's physical condition and despair of having a happy future were very understandable and real and he hid it behind a sarcastic voice. Correctly he was matched with a Pollyanna character who could see the good in everything, but this transition has to be handled very carefully. Too much and the cure is seen as being impossible or unsustainable whereas if there's too little (ie a night of sex as Josh did it) and it becomes too easy, thus nullifying the depth of what has come before.
So getting this balance right is difficult.
Too much, and many readers lose patience. "Okay, I can see what's going to happen, end of story".


message 45: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco Are you saying that Josh handled it well in that story?

It did work for me in that story (even tho it was only one quickie night), and if I think of it, part of the reason why was that he made me believe that whathisface (*sigh*) was on the cusp of crisis, and he was going to fall to either one side or the other, regardless. So my brain allowed it to happen fast.

I'd agree that that aspect didn't work so well in "Nights".


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Sorry. No more $3 words.

The balance is key. I like broken characters, even characters who dislike themselves and feel worthless...to a degree. In the right kind of story they can be as battered as James (James?) in '9 Lights' and I will enjoy the hell out of them. In a romance or pseudo-romance, not so much.

'Just Desserts' I haven't read. I stopped reading the PMs at #5 and I haven't been convinced to pick back up again. Can you do a quick synopsis?


message 47: by Oco (new) - rated it 5 stars

Oco We meet the main character (Ridge) as he has decided to murder his cousin (not even caring much if he gets caught), who put him in a wheelchair during a DUI accident, and also 'stole' his (Ridge's) inheritance (they are from old money). Ridge is bitter bitter bitter and angry.

"Tug", a physical therapist and pollyanna good guy, comes to work on Ridge and turns him around.

Brief enough for you? :)


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

Very nice. Thanks. I get the gist of what's going on, and yes, it sounds tricky to pull that off in a short story. :)


message 49: by A.B. (new) - rated it 5 stars

A.B. Gayle Ridge is confined to a wheelchair after a car accident which may or may not have been caused by his cousin who wishes to inherit their mutual grandfather's house. He has a certain degree of paralysis or at least can't support his weight on sticks for long periods without getting pain.
He decides to kill his cousin by inserting poison into some chocolates. Unfortunately, doing that requires him to visit a difficult to access shed and he ends up sprawled on the ground. Meantime, he has been placed under the care of a younger gay guy he helped at school (but had forgotten) this character has always idolised him and assumes he's trying to poison himself. He ends up in bed with the little Pollyanna and suddenly the future doesn't seem so bleak.


message 50: by Kyle (new) - added it

Kyle Sullivan Thanks for the great review, Oco! I'm so glad you were able to get into the book and its meaning!


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