Michael's Reviews > Northwest Angle

Northwest Angle by William Kent Krueger
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William Kent Krueger has delivered another fine novel with "Northwest Angle."
The story has picturesque settings, a suspenseful plot and a strong message.

Cork O'Connor takes his family on vacation on a houseboat.

When a destructive storm develops, Cork and his daughter, Jenny, are separated from the others and wind up on one of the many islands on the Lake of the Woods in Minnesota on the U.S. Canada border.

Jenny hears the whimper of a baby and discovers the body of a young woman who had been murdered. The woman showed signs of being tortured and Jenny assumes that the woman was the child's mother.

As Jenny and Cork ponder their rescue, they wonder who killed the girl and what to do if the person returned.

Cork's sister-in-law, Rosa and her husband are both strongly religious and at times in the story, they consider their faith and why would God permit certain things from happening to good people.

The story is rich in American Indian history. Cork is part Ojkbwe and can relate to the other American Indians. Cork's son, Stephen also demonstrates his spirituality and communication ability with other American Indian characters, in particular the elders.

I read this story compulsively and enjoyed the well described characters while wondering how they would escape their situation. The twist that the author provides adds to the intelligence of the story and the satisfaction with the conclusion.
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