David Glasgow's Reviews > Emerson's Essays, both series First Series and Second Series

Emerson's Essays, both series First Series and Second Series by Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Quotes David Liked

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Doubt not, O poet, but persist. Say 'It is in me, and shall out.' Stand there, balked and dumb, stuttering and stammering, hissed and hooted, stand and strive, until at last rage draw out of thee that dream-power which every night shows thee is thine own; a power transcending all limit and privacy, and by virtue of which a man is the conductor of the whole river of electricity.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“It is not metres, but a metre-making argument that makes a poem,—a thought so passionate and alive that like the spirit of a plant or an animal it has an architecture of its own, and adorns nature with a new thing. The thought and the form are equal in the order of time, but in the order of genesis the thought is prior to the form.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Why covet a knowledge of new facts? Day and night, house and garden, a few books, a few actions, serve us as well as would all trades and all spectacles. We are far from having exhausted the significance of the few symbols we use. We can come to use them yet with a terrible simplicity.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“the mystic must be steadily told,—All that you say is just as true without the tedious use of that symbol as with it. Let us have a little algebra, instead of this trite rhetoric,—universal signs, instead of these village symbols,—and we shall both be gainers. The history of hierarchies seems to show that all religious error consisted in making the symbol too stark and solid, and was at last nothing but an excess of the organ of language.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Every revolution was first a thought in one man's mind, and when the same thought occurs to another man, it is the key to that era.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“We, as we read, must become Greeks, Romans, Turks, priest and king, martyr and executioner; must fasten these images to some reality in our secret experience, or we shall learn nothing rightly.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“I have no expectation that any man will read history aright who thinks that what was done in a remote age, by men whose names have resounded far, has any deeper sense than what he is doing today.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“At times the whole world seems to be in conspiracy to importune you with emphatic trifles. Friend, client, child, sickness, fear, want, charity, all knock at once at thy closet door and say,—'Come out unto us.' But keep thy state; come not into their confusion. The power men possess to annoy me I give them by a weak curiosity. No man can come near me but through my act.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson


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