Taryn's Reviews > Hamlet

Hamlet by William Shakespeare
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Sep 06, 11

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Read in April, 1995


Hamlet is such an intricate story. I am certainly not a Shakespeare fan by any means. Hamlet is unlike any character before him and maybe even after him. He is thoughtful of his predicament, pondering immensely, then his actions are swift almost mad in comparison to his pensiveness. Some of the greatest quotes are from this play.
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Quotes Taryn Liked

William Shakespeare
“Doubt thou the stars are fire;
Doubt that the sun doth move;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
But never doubt I love.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“Conscience doth make cowards of us all.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince;
And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“To die, to sleep -
To sleep, perchance to dream - ay, there's the rub,
For in this sleep of death what dreams may come...”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd!”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“It is not, nor it cannot, come to good,
But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“One may smile, and smile, and be a villain. ”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet

William Shakespeare
“The rest, is silence.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Melissa Crory On my top five. If any single character in literature exemplifies the sorrow of the human condition - Hamlet is it.


Taryn Perfect comment, so much so I wish it were mine!


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