Lindsay's Reviews > Summer at Tiffany

Summer at Tiffany by Marjorie Hart
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Jun 25, 11

bookshelves: second-year-of-the-project-read, i-have-this-book
Read from June 19 to 24, 2011

“‘The True measure of a person’s success is to be a person of value.’ I knew people of value, people who kept their promises, people who were kind, people who were loyal.”


Summer at Tiffany's is a memoir, and non-fiction books are not typically on my reading list. This book is hard to put down. Even a contemporary reader can relate to Ms. Hart on a number of levels. Themes presented in this book include small town girl hits the big city, women in the workplace, and a young woman's first job. Through the small town girl hits the big city theme, Hart displays the stereotypes associated with life in a small town. The book explores the subservient role of women in the 1940s workplace. In addition, her memoir presents the conflicting opinions expressed during the time about women attending college. In the most basic sense, the book can be read as an account of a first job experience.Set in the forties, the style is refreshingly contemporary and witty. The cutesy writing style adds hints of humor -- picking up pearls in an elevator and getting a Tiffany engagement ring stuck on your finger -- it does not get much more humorous.The chapters are structured to include narration in the present tense followed by a note to the author's family, and concludes with past tense reflection. Finally, the reader gets a glimpse of Tiffany's, 1940s NYC, as well as life during wartime.
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Quotes Lindsay Liked

“The True measure of a person’s success is to be a person of value.’ I knew people of value, people who kept their promises, people who were kind, people who were loyal.”
Marjorie Hart, Summer at Tiffany


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