Andrea's Reviews > Kisses from Katie: A Story of Relentless Love and Redemption

Kisses from Katie by Katie J. Davis
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Jun 13, 11

bookshelves: africa, development, religion, east-africa

This is a very strange book. First, the comparisons of a 22 year old to Mother Theresa ( the galley I had referred to Greg Mortenson on the back too, but I'm guessing they'll take that off) kind of put me off to begin with. Second, the hysterical tone of the religious language and the patronizing attitude toward the Ugandans she works with was disturbing. Why would someone hire a teenager who didn't speak the local language to teach kindergarten? Was she actually being paid a salary? Was it more or less than they paid the interpreter in her classroom? These are the kinds of questions that this book raises for a cynical reader (obviously me). Davis refers to herself as the "mother" of 14 Ugandan girls, but, in actuality, she is running a foster home. She receives payments from the non-profit her parents established in the U.S. to cover all of the household's expenses. She leaves Uganda for weeks and even months at a time. Certainly, I understand why she would travel home to the U.S. to be with her parents and to attend college. But a mother of 13 children would never do this. Mothers of thirteen children are generally not supported by generous charitable donations. At 22, how can she claim that she knows she will be able to provide the life long care and educational opportunities that she would have provided for her biological children if she had chosen to stay in her upper class home in the U.S.? As a charity, it's admirable, but the kind of saintly hero status this book tries to establish for its narrator is neither believable nor healthy. Another fundraising book, and this one full of condescending references to "chocolate colored" children. "When you give, do not let your right hand know what your left hand is doing." Surprised Davis doesn't think of this verse in all her bible spouting.
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message 7: by Muphyn (new)

Muphyn The blurb doesn't read too bad (if a little soppy) but your review has certainly shed a different light on it and has put me off thoroughly!! I'm so over these Christian books on "look, I've gone on a mission trip and now I'm saving the world"... There are plenty that truly inspire me though this one doesn't seem to be one of them. Thanks for the review!! :)


Andrea My teenaged daughter read parts of it and thought I was being too hard on her. Somehow, though I just can't deal with this book.


message 5: by Muphyn (new)

Muphyn *laugh* I have a feeling that I'd agree with you so I think I'll probably give this one a miss. :)


message 4: by Megan (new)

Megan I think the story is beautiful. I don't know many college kids who would turn their world upside down and go around the world to help a poverty stricken country. This story is one that encourages Christians to follow the will God has He has laid out for their lives. We live in a society that is so focused on themselves and stepping on others to get what we want. Great book!


Cynde Livingston It was pretty obvious that her parents were helping her with money to live, etc. It is also obvious that Africa does not have our (America) stringent rules of education to teach...they are a desperate nation and she was working with kindergartners! If you have all these questions Andrea perhaps you need to take a trip and I saw nothing patronizing in her attitude at all, just a lot of love!!!


Jessica Are you Christian? This girl is doing amazing things. I don't know, maybe she isn't perfect. None of us are. It's apparent though that she has changed hundreds of precious children's lives. I don't think she went to Uganda to live a cushy life. I think she talks about the service she does with others, not to brag, but to talk about the journey she has had with Jesus. Take the plank out of your eye, before you remove the speck in another's.


message 1: by Karen (new) - added it

Karen Mizener Amen!!


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