Susan's Reviews > The Troubled Man

The Troubled Man by Henning Mankell
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May 02, 11

bookshelves: mysteries, scandinavia

I am enjoying the work of a master: Mankell's the reason I started reading Scandinavian mysteries because he lets the humanity of his characters shine through the pain of unraveling a story with a bad ending.

Particularly touching for this person facing old age: I've often, as Mankell writes, been afraid of falling through the hole of memory. The Troubled Man, which refers to the detective and his quarry, has a compelling mystery, not an astonishingly polished and self-pitying memoir. I have understood for some time why I found a stack of mysteries on my mother-in-law's night table after she had died. Stories like Mankell's that have a comprehensible ending are comforting. If I have not even begun to describe the plot it is not because it is inconsequential; as Molly has said, it is because I was more interested in the detective. The novel has an extremely dry tone and sluggish pace, perhaps because of the translation which is not always idiomatic, but more likely because this is Mankell's attempt to document as a non-writer would a mysterious set of disappearances that affect the detective's own family.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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message 1: by Molly (new)

Molly And precisely because of the humanity of our detective, this was one of the saddest books that I ever read.


Susan Particularly touching for this person facing old age: I've often, as Mankell writes, been afraid of falling through the hole of memory. The Troubled Man, which refers to the detective and his quarry, has a compelling mystery, not an astonishingly polished and self-pitying memoir. I have understood for some time why I found a stack of mysteries on my mother-in-law's night table after she had died. Stories like Mankell's that have a comprehensible ending are comforting. If I have not even begun to describe the plot it is not because it is inconsequential; as Molly has said, it is because I was more interested in the detective. The novel has an extremely dry tone and sluggish pace, perhaps because of the translation which is not always idiomatic, but more likely because this is Mankell's attempt to document as a non-writer would a mysterious set of disappearances that affect the detective's own family.


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