Kemper's Reviews > The Green Eagle Score

The Green Eagle Score by Richard Stark
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Apr 22, 11

bookshelves: 2011, bad-guys-rule, crime-mystery, thieves, parker

No money is safe when Parker is around. Not even if it belongs to the U.S. military.

Parker is lounging at a resort in Puerto Rico with his new gal pal, Claire, when he is approached by another professional thief named Marty Fusco who just got out of prison. Fusco wants to bring Parker in to plan a job stealing the cash payroll from an Air Force base. While Parker initially dismisses the idea of stealing the pay of 5000 armed men, he agrees to go to New York state and check out the set-up. The situation is odd with Fusco working with an inside man who is shacked up with his ex-wife, but the ever resourceful Parker sees an opportunity and starts working up a scheme to make off with the loot. As always, there’s complications waiting to screw up Parker’s well-laid plans.

It’s getting hard to come up with anything new to say about these Parker novels. It’s the same basic formula. Parker gets approached to plan a robbery. There are issues with the people involved and/or the set-up. Parker comes up with a plan. Parker recruits people and gathers equipment. Parker executes the robbery. Some twists occurs that screws up Parker’s getaway. Parker has to improvise. Parker may or may not get away with the swag.

You’d think that this would get boring and repetitive, especially since Parker is just a relentless stealing machine without conscience or empathy. Even getting a steady girlfriend hasn’t changed him so this is a series where the main character shows absolutely no growth from the first book to the last. Yet Stark’s (a/k/a Westlake’s) writing still sucks a reader in immediately with it’s portrait of the blunt and relentless Parker steamrolling over anyone or anything between him and completing the job.

This edition also features an interesting introduction by another great mystery writer, Dennis Lehane, that examines why Parker is so unique and important to crime fiction.
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Comments (showing 1-7 of 7) (7 new)

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Adam I especially liked this one because of the clever way Parker gets in and out of the Air Force base.

I also liked that it introduced Stan Devers, who was relatable, and seemed more like a real person than an associate like Grofield.

I also like any book that showcases what my wife calls Parker's "stone-cold managerial style" (a term she used after reading "The Score"), and there's plenty of that in this one, especially after the robbery.


Kemper Adam wrote: "I also like any book that showcases what my wife calls Parker's "stone-cold managerial style".

If Parker calls a staff meeting, you better be on time and remember the doughnuts when it's your turn to bring them.


Adam I'm imagining being empty-handed when Parker says to me from across the conference table, "Adam, you pulled team snackgasm last week. What did you bring?" and I'm trembling inside.


Kemper Adam wrote: "I'm imagining being empty-handed when Parker says to me from across the conference table, "Adam, you pulled team snackgasm last week. What did you bring?" and I'm trembling inside."

Next thing you know, you're standing in line at Dunkin Doughnuts while trying to get your head to stop bleeding from the pistol whipping...


James Thane This is another good one, but you're right--it is hard to find something new to say about them. I just finished rereading one of Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder novels, and I'm having the same problem. I'm not sure what I have to say about it that I haven't already said about several of his others, let alone what a lot of others have had to say about them.


Kemper James wrote: "This is another good one, but you're right--it is hard to find something new to say about them.

Yeah, it frustrates me because they're still great, but other than saying it's a Parker novel, I got nothing.


James Thane Well, but just saying that it's a Parker novel tells you about all you need to know. But having said that, I suppose there's the occasional person who's never read one of these books and sees your review. Even if you're essentially repeating something that you've said in four other reviews, he or she will still be eternally grateful to you for turning them on to a great series...


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