Drew Nelson's Reviews > The Silver Chair

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis
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Apr 22, 11

Read from April 18 to 21, 2011

It's been a long time since I've read anything in Narnia, and I started here because we'd just seen the Voyage of the Dawn Treader movie. The silver chair is not the best of the Narnia novels, but it's still good, with its thoughtful theological backing and decently fun adventure. Not sure how they're going to make a movie of this one though... In any case, it reminded me of why I loved the Narnia novels when I was younger. It's the thought of escaping to a fantasy land and coming back wiser and better to deal with reality.

Perhaps its just the varnish of memory, but it seems to me that the characters in this novel were a little more thinly drawn than those in most of the Narnia novels. Jill, particularly, is hardly more than a placeholder. The marsh wiggle is delightful though. If you don't love puddleglum, you have no heart.

In my opinion, one of the best parts of the novel is the death scene at the end. It's just such a wonderful depiction of how death can be both sad and glorious, commonplace and unique. "Most people have died, you know."
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message 1: by Drew (last edited Apr 21, 2011 02:55PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Drew Nelson It's been a long time since I've read anything in Narnia, and I started here because we'd just seen the Voyage of the Dawn Treader movie. The silver chair is not the best of the Narnia novels, but it's still good, with its thoughtful theological backing and decently fun adventure. Not sure how they're going to make a movie of this one though... In any case, it reminded me of why I loved the Narnia novels when I was younger. It's the thought of escaping to a fantasy land and coming back wiser and better to deal with reality.

Perhaps its just the varnish of memory, but it seems to me that the characters in this novel were a little more thinly drawn than those in most of the Narnia novels. Jill, particularly, is hardly more than a placeholder. The marsh wiggle is delightful though. If you don't love puddleglum, you have no heart.

In my opinion, one of the best parts of the novel is the death scene at the end. It's just such a wonderful depiction of how death can be both sad and glorious, commonplace and unique. "Most people have died, you know."


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