Geoffrey Fox's Reviews > A Mind at Peace

A Mind at Peace by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
3024716
's review
Apr 08, 11

Read in April, 2011

This lyrical evocation of Istanbul on the eve of the second world war is experienced through eyes, ears and mind of a young man especially sensitive to the terrible conflicts of its recent past, the city's two-faced identity (looking toward Asia and toward Europe), the country's economic backwardness, the beauty of the Bosphorus and of the homes, some splendid, some ruinous that border it, the sharp class divisions and the powerful ties of family. The young man is Mümtaz, orphaned in the war against the Greeks in 1923 and now, in 1939, 27 years old. Besides the city itself and its music, especially the traditional türküs and Ottoman classical music, the chief influences on him are his much older cousin İhsan, his professor and his guardian since his early ophanhood; Nuran, a beautiful divorcée with a lovely singing voice, two years older than Mümtaz, who was his fiancée in the previous summer but now has abandoned him and left him hopelessly forlorn; and Suad, another cousin, terribly smart, cynical, and tormented. Their conflicting passions and their doubts are a gigantic, complex metaphor for Turkey itself.

The translation is quite elegant, though the translator has a penchant for some unusual English words ("luculent" is a favorite) and resorts often to the Turkish words in the descriptions of boating on the Bosphorus and other passages. It is a moving and ambitious book, that can be appreciated by any reader but will be most fully appreciated by those famliar with the music that is evoked almost throughout.
1 like · Likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read A Mind at Peace.
Sign In »

Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

Şahika Orhan Pamuk has described "Huzur" as "the best book ever written on İstanbul"
As to the language, Tanpinar uses a lyrical Turkish that is at the same laden with Ottoman Turkish words, which renders his writings hard to understand for those who don't possess the necessary reading background.
I am lucky since I can read him in Turkish; translating Tanpinar into another language would be one of the most difficult translation tasks ever and it is almost indispensable that too much would be "lost in translation".


Geoffrey Fox Şahika wrote: "Orhan Pamuk has described "Huzur" as "the best book ever written on İstanbul"
As to the language, Tanpinar uses a lyrical Turkish that is at the same laden with Ottoman Turkish words, which renders..."


Yes, it was Pamuk's recommendation that pointed me to this book (and also his influence with his publisher that got it translated into English). I wish I too could read Tanpınar in Turkish. I began studying the language after my own novel, "A Gift for the Sultan", was translated into that language, but I haven't made great progress. The publisher (Nokta Kitap, 2012) retitled it as Bir cihan, iki sultan.


back to top