Krystle's Reviews > Stormdancer

Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff
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Sep 17, 12

Read from August 10 to 31, 2012

WARNING! EXCESSIVE LENGTH AND ONE ANGRY WOMAN!

I really have no idea how I’m going to do this review when everyone else expressed everything I wanted to say in such an eloquent and succinct manner, especially Cyna’s review.

You have no idea how badly, badly, I wanted this book to turn out brilliant and smashing and turn into one of those amazingly successful books that takes the publishing world by storm. Even more so when the absolutely gorgeous and fantastic covers that came out which weren’t white-washed! Omg, SCORE! Although I am really tired of sakura (cherry blossoms) being used as a motif to designate/symbolize that this book is about Japan. I mean, really? Can we create something a bit more original that’s not so tried and predictable?

Ugh, I’m getting off topic.

So, when I read the first three chapters I thought this was great stuff. Oh, man. I was ready to start running around and screaming its wonders.

Until I hit that solid wall soon after.

Holy crap. That prose. It drove me crazy and made my eyes wander. There were long passages that described everything in minute detail and these many passages stretched over many, many pages. It reminded me of Cayla Kluver’s novel, Legacy. One I also hated for the excessive mind-numbing amount of unnecessary overly specific descriptions that were just fluff and not needed. Not to mention I already read enough dense and long articles every day for grad school, my brain does not want to be burdened with more. It really doesn’t.



In fact, it got so bad that I started skimming a majority of the novel and I really can’t give an exclamatory
grade/rating/review/whatever you want to call it for something I skimmed the majority of. It’s probably why I forgot a lot of IMPORTANT STUFF I should have noticed.

You know, it really sits my teeth on edge when all along this book was heavily marketed as kind of like a book set in some sort of alternate history version of Japan with an added splash of fantasy and steampunk only it’s really a Japanese-inspired story set in an alternate world. The Japanese elements of this story are so heavily borrowed to create a world just like Japan that I’m super critical.

I didn’t know until later but it really upset me that the extent of the author’s research was only via Wikipedia and by watching anime. Really? REALLY? Even when I had essays for my Japanese literature classes I did extensive research by reading the original source material, looking up the author’s ideology and how it showed up in his work, the social and political climate at the time, and even went through books that had critical commentary on the literary movement's novels. And that’s just an ESSAY. Seriously? SERIOUSLY? My culture and heritage is not something you can surface skip through a five minute perusal of links on Wikipedia and splash something together and say it’s a great homage to it. No. NO, NO, NO.

There is a lot of use and abuse of the Japanese language in this novel. I mean, if this is supposed to be set in an alternate world to Japan but is NOT Japan, why are they still using Japanese and THEN having characters NOT understanding whatever is said IN Japanese? That does not make sense at all!

It really aggravated me when the suffix –sama was used by itself as an address to someone of higher rank. Excuse me? Sama does not function that way. It’s a suffix. It’s even stated in that glossary that it’s a suffix, so why is it used so incorrectly!? Ugh! Furthermore, if more research was done into the very rigid class construct and hierarchy system in Japan, you can’t just USE someone’s name and just add a –san or a –sama and address them as such. They are ABOVE you. You do not have that social status or standing or right that refer to them as if you were on equivalent levels. This does not automatically make your speech more polite. There is a lot more to it than that!

I don't remember this word being used that much in the novel but my eyes caught on it right away: sarariman or salary men/man. This is for white collar workers who spend all their time in offices and cubicles. This word has NO place in a fantasy novel set in a historical context because this word is a MODERN convention. I'm sorry, you can't just take a word like this and apply it for anything, especially in a historical context because the word is very MODERN. It's a borrowed ENGLISH word adapted for the Japanese language (or katakana-ized if you prefer). Gah! I just want to rip something into shreds.

Oh and then there's that "aiya" thing. Aiya means something like "oh no" or an expression of surprise, dismay, or shock when something happens you didn't expect or didn't want to happen. Like you placed your stack of books on the table and then as soon as you walk away they all fall down. Aiya is a CHINESE expression, NOT Japanese. I am telling you this bothered me a whole heck of a lot seeing this OVER AND OVER again. It may have the same phonological similarity but it is NOT Japanese.

It really irritated me when he just threw out random words haphazardly in his sentences. It just totally destroys the prose and it’s extremely unnecessary. It smells of weeabos going, “Omg, this is SO kawaii, ne?” Just SHOOT ME NOW. And he doesn’t do this sparsely, he does this ALL. THE. TIME. It’s an eyesore and something I commented on in other books. And that hai thing? COME ON. REALLY? Hai is not the general universal, yes, or I understood. You know there are other variations! Like un, sou desu, wakarimashita, ryoukai, kashikomarimashita, all with varying levels of politeness and casualness. (And different conjugations). Meh…

Another thing that I hated was how the author used simple words to designate his world. Like “shima” for the Japan-like island place this story was set in. Shima means island, so Island Isles? WTF? I remember he said that it’s hard not to be literal and things but using simple words like kyoudai, shiroi, gaijin for your naming conventions sounds very ridiculous to a person who can understand Japanese at a high enough level. It does not bring any mystique or what not to whatever thing he’s trying to do because it only made me laugh. I think it’s a waste of time for the reader if you KEEP translating what the words are in very close proximity to when you originally used, especially when there’s already a glossary provided in the back. UGH. Some people might think this is cool but I’m sorry, I think this is terribly lazy because if you really wanted to use Japanese words you could at least try to combine words or kanji compounds together and make something up. Even putting together random sounds would have been fine as a last resort.

The male gaze is pretty prevalent in here. One scene that really grossed me out is that Yukiko’s identity is discovered by boys who peep on her when she goes to take a bath. REALLY? REALLY? That’s the only feasible way you could have had your plot move forward? By having guys PEEP on her? You couldn’t have say, had her tattoos uncovered when she’s FIGHTING monsters or something? I don’t know, something less creepy. It really creeped me out when the brother’s sister is described as being extremely beautiful that all men wanted a taste of – and that’s compounded by the fact that there’s some incest relationship going on there? SERIOUSLY? Did we really need that? Ugh, gross.

Btw, who are the gaijin anyway? This is never explained or dealt with. Also the lotus thing that everyone gets drunk on… Lotus? Why lotus? I mean, Japanese love to use nature and especially flowers as symbolism in their works but a lotus doesn’t have as much weight or impact as say sakura or kiku or a litany of other things. And if you wanted to show drugs, what’s the problem with opium that came from POPPIES? They did have that back then, you know.

I didn’t like how the poetry aspects were scoffed at. Haiku is not the be all and end all of Japanese poetry, you know? There’s also tanka, chouka, renga, and freestyle (plus many more). Being able to write beautiful poems was a point of pride back then. They would spend hours having poetry competitions adding to another person’s poem, or reading out loud their own. The one’s with the most eloquent, beautiful, witty, or impressive were seen as highly intellectual individuals that were praised and respected. I didn’t like how this was just thrown in as just to add more “flavor” to the story. I remember the manyoushuu being brought up and it was called, The Book of a Thousand Deaths, or I dunno some ridiculous title like that. FYI, it’s called “The Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves”.

If you’re going to borrow so heavily from Japanese, at least create new aspects to your world. Something Shadows on the Moon or the Eon: Dragoneye Reborn series (although this one is based more off of Chinese culture/mythology) did quite excellently.

I kind of marginally liked Buruu’s snark and attitude and the connection he had with Yukiko as it was fun to see them grow into their bond together. The last quarter of the book moved at a lot quicker pace and I didn’t have to slog through it as much as I did in the first three-fourths. At least there were plot twists I wasn’t expecting. I even sort of liked Yukiko’s romance with the green-eyed (ugh) soldier because she got to have a consensual sexual relationship with him and wasn’t shamed for it (at first), until you realize he used her feelings and sex against her as a form of manipulation and called her “filthy” and “dirty”.

There was something that always bothered me about the green-eyed soldier until Linda’s post pointed it out perfectly. These are ASIAN characters where the majority of common people have BROWN eyes. I know there are exceptions like some ethnic Chinese groups or Mongolian people (although this is contested as there may have been crossing way back when) but for regular pure-blooded Japanese people, this is practically impossible. Why can’t Yukiko be initially attracted to someone with BROWN EYES? What’s wrong with them? Meh.

I can go on and on and on but this review is heinously long. There’s also the problem I had with the depiction of the Shinto gods, the grossly incorrect usage of kimono – including juunihitoe (for royals!), pandas, inconsistent and/or incorrect romanization of Japanese, non-Japanese names (Aisha!?), and a myriad of other things.

To sum it up quickly: Bitterly disappointing. I am not happy. Not at all.

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Reading Progress

08/10/2012 page 31
9.0% "I feel like I'm in an anime smorgasbord."
08/18/2012 page 78
23.0% "Oh, yay, finally! The arashitora appears. I could do without the large amounts of details in the descriptions though. I'm constantly forgetting who is who."
08/22/2012 page 181
54.0% "Young boys peeping on girls in the bath? ...Creepy much?"
08/26/2012 page 273
81.0% "Well that was a plot twist. Should have seen it coming. Poor Buruu. I like Hiro though."
08/31/2012 page 336
100.0% "Finally finished!"

Comments (showing 1-44 of 44) (44 new)

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message 1: by Dara (new) - added it

Dara I just marked it to read. I'm all about the Japanese-inspired stories! Let's hope it's done well!


message 2: by Maya (new) - added it

Maya huh, as a fellow "japanophile" your reaction will be interesting ...


message 3: by Claudie (new) - added it

Claudie Muchindu I cant wait to get my hands on a copy and the cover should be framed, it is that pretty.


message 4: by Maya (new) - added it

Maya how are you faring with this? Apparently their default language is English with some (a lot) japanese words thrown in?


Krystle Maya wrote: "how are you faring with this? Apparently their default language is English with some (a lot) japanese words thrown in?"

Yeah. The Japanese words that are thrown in irritate me a lot. Especially when they're used incorrectly or stick out like a sore thing. I like it so far, I mean his ideas are great, but the writing and execution of it isn't living up to his imagination.


Vanessa I had to sleep on my rating of this too. You're not alone.


Nemo (the Moonlight Library) Krystle wrote: "I like it so far, I mean his ideas are great, but the writing and execution of it isn't living up to his imagination."

Funny Krystle, I am finding the absolute opposite. I think Kristoff's technical writing and his descriptions are divine, but the plot is boring me.


message 9: by Katie (new)

Katie Love you for recommending Shadows on the Moon and Eon. I haven't read Stormdancer yet, but it sounds like it fails miserably at what it's supposed to be.


message 10: by Linda (new) - rated it 1 star

Linda Your new rant is awesome! You make a lot of great points, including ones that other reviewers hadn't mentioned, so it was cool to learn more about this book. And thanks for the link. :)

Yeah, I didn't know about the problematic objectification of women until I saw Cyna's review. So disappointing that the entire book is written from the perspective of a straight white male even though it has a WOC protagonist in a non-European setting. It's totally possible for a straight white male to do justice to a story like this by respecting the source culture, not indulging in exoticism, and not subjecting all the female characters to the male gaze, but from what I've seen it doesn't look like that's the case for this book. :(

Thanks again for taking the time to analyze the book and write this review!


message 11: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie Great review, pointing out all the problematic elements. I'm pretty sure this is going off my to-read list, there's too much else to read where I don't have to worry about those issues that drive me nuts.

And they dis the poetry! That's especially irritating.


message 12: by Vi (new) - added it

Vi Vi I may have a hard time ever picking up a book starring a WOC in a non-European setting written by a straight white guy again. It's like they almost always get it wrong, and then puff their chests out and call the rest of us 'crazy' or something for not getting their brilliance. GAG.

I was going to put this lower in the pile, but honestly, now, this is going off my To Read List all together.

Also so glad to hear from an ACTUAL JAPANESE WOMAN on this subject. I'm sure he'll dismiss you too, though. White men always know best.


Nafiza This was awesome. I loved it. A lot. And I came across my review for it and then realized that yes, I was angry and that no, I didn't think it deserved the stars I gave it especially when I read his interview. UGH.


Krystle Thanks everyone for your comments!

@Nemo: Heh, a lot of people loved the prose. Guess this why we all have different tastes!

@Katie: I hope you like the books I recommended! The Eon series is a Chinese-inspired fantasy though. Just so you know. ^^;;.

@Linda: Yeah! Sad to say I haven't found much exemplary examples of it though. =(.

@Marie: I really like Japanese/Asian poetry so I was pretty upset/frustrated at it being used as a comedic device than what it potentially could be used for.

@Vi: I know, right?! Ugh! It really upsets me. Definitely an example of white privilege. Eew.

@Nafiza: Thanks! His interviews are really what pissed me off. I mean if I hadn't found that out I would maybe have kept the rating at 3 stars but no, not after that.


The Holy Terror Which interview are you guys talking about?


The Holy Terror Nafiza wrote: "This one: http://dashcooray.wordpress.com/2012/..."

Ok, I'll wait to read it after I finish the book. Thanks for the link.


missART I'm happy to know I wasn't the only one who probably bashed the book over their head at the gargled use of the Japanese language in this otherwise fun book.

The long prose didn't bother me (it was summer), but the cultural inaccuracies were quite off putting at times.

A couple I will tack on to your rant is everyone was bowing in a traditional CHINESE style (fist-to-palm), and a traditional Japanese floor harp - known as a koto - was refereed to as a shamisen (an instrument not unlike the guitar). A little research would have revealed that.

To the average Western reader, I feel these mistakes will not be noticed. And overall I enjoyed the story... But my secret wish is for it to be picked up by an animation studio in Japan so they can revise it appropriately, and because it read like an anime.


Krystle Alli wrote: "I'm happy to know I wasn't the only one who probably bashed the book over their head at the gargled use of the Japanese language in this otherwise fun book.

The long prose didn't bother me (it was..."


Haha, good eye! I should not have skimmed so much. I missed a lot of details. Maybe I should re-read it and give it a more thorough scrutiny but my brain doesn't want to bleed.


missART Krystle wrote: "Haha, good eye! I should not have skimmed so much. I missed a lot of details. Maybe I should re-read it and give it a more thorough scrutiny but my brain doesn't want to bleed."

Haha yeah, I think we about caught the big stuff though. Don't subject yourself!


message 21: by Maya (new) - added it

Maya Alli wrote: "But my secret wish is for it to be picked up by an animation studio in Japan so they can revise it appropriately, and because it read like an anime. "

Actually, you might be interested in watching "Beast Player Erin". It's a japanese-inspired fantasy with a setting that resembles the middle ages, the opposing powers of the shogun and the emperor and a strong heroine who has a special connection to griffin-like creatures. It is a great series, based on a novel that hasn't been translated yet, from the same author as the Moribito (fantasy inspired by ancient japan and anthropology) series (which I also recommend to anybody interested in asian fantasy :)


message 22: by Marie (new) - added it

Marie I like snagging the recommendations in this thread :)


Syahira Sharif I'm no good with asian poetry even though I am asian *wince* but its understandable because asian poetry is huge (east, west north, south.. blergh). I love that you included a commentary on the 'haikus' in your review.


Krystle Syahira wrote: "I'm no good with asian poetry even though I am asian *wince* but its understandable because asian poetry is huge (east, west north, south.. blergh). I love that you included a commentary on the 'ha..."

Yeah, I know. I love Japanese/Asian poetry. It's very metaphorical, symbolic, and full of embedded emotion. It got me so upset that poetry is dealt with such a cavalier attitude.


Syahira Sharif I'm more interested in critical reading of novel/ss/drama lit... I studied both clasical and modern western and malay poetry at school and frankly I dislike being forced to study them. I do currently following a certificate modern poetry course in american literature on coursera and thankfully, I'm getting better at critical reading in poetry now.

frankly, stormdancer isn't a bad novel for YA but if the whole japan-inspired thing is taken more seriously and less trying to sound exotic, the book could rise up to the same par to the rest foreign-inspired YA novels by a foreigner.


Krystle Syahira wrote: "I'm more interested in critical reading of novel/ss/drama lit... I studied both clasical and modern western and malay poetry at school and frankly I dislike being forced to study them. I do current..."

Ah, I'm not a fan of poetry either but Asian poetry seems to be my thing.

Stormdancer already has its share of followers so I guess it succeeds on many points, just that the appropriation and exoticism is more than troubling. *sigh* It had so much potential.


Syahira Sharif I've compared it to Memoir of a Geisha craze some years ago. Generally people/fans didn't think its a problem when Geisha was misrepresented and just love the exoticism potrayed.

I still haven't find myself enjoying either the movie and book especially when I found out the book's inspiration, Iwasaki Mineko, receiving death threats because of it. Besides, I'm more interested in stories of Oiran and Gisaeng than Geisha these days.

I've enjoyed a lot of japanese mythology and frankly, the hype would have been better way to introduce a lot of obsecure tales to english-speaking countries. Unfortunately... sigh


message 28: by Maya (last edited Sep 26, 2012 04:29AM) (new) - added it

Maya Syahira wrote: "I'm more interested in stories of Oiran and Gisaeng than Geisha these days."

You've watched / read Sakuran?


message 29: by Syahira (last edited Sep 26, 2012 07:32AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Syahira Sharif Maya wrote: "Syahira wrote: "I'm more interested in stories of Oiran and Gisaeng than Geisha these days."

You've watched / read Sakuran?"


Oh yeah... Years ago. Manga first and then the movie. I love anna tsuchiya!


message 30: by Maya (new) - added it

Maya me too :) wish she'd do some more movies ...


sanshow Syahira wrote: "I've compared it to Memoir of a Geisha craze some years ago. Generally people/fans didn't think its a problem when Geisha was misrepresented and just love the exoticism potrayed.

I still haven't f..."


I was very young when I read MOAG and didn't quite spot the problems that people had with misappropriation. Many years later I came to read Iwasaki's own memoirs and although it's not as dramatic, I could then see how she minded certain aspects depicted in Golden's book.

And Krystle, you just about articulated all my arrghhh with the ridiculous accents in Stormdancer, and let's not even go to the writing. It seemed Kristoff's so in love with his own writing he just indulged in droning on and on at the expense of the plot, and us readers.


message 32: by Krystle (last edited Oct 01, 2012 08:21PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Krystle sanshow wrote: "Syahira wrote: "I've compared it to Memoir of a Geisha craze some years ago. Generally people/fans didn't think its a problem when Geisha was misrepresented and just love the exoticism potrayed.

I..."


I actually haven't read Memoirs of a Geisha yet even though I own the book (how terrible!). I'm kind of wary due to the exoticism going on with the blue eyes and geisha being portrayed as sexual objects/prostitutes when they really aren't. (Sure some may have participated in this but that doesn't mean you can make a sweeping generalization for all of them!) Oiran, on the other hand, however are more in line with the "prostitute" idea but they're exceptionally high class and very trained in the arts and their sole occupation is also not one of sex.

*sigh* This Stormdancer book just disappointed me so very much. I don't think I have the heart to try out the sequels.


TheFountainPenDiva As a black woman I enjoyed Stormdancer, but I understand the issues a person of Asian descent would have with it. I loved reading the two and one-star reviews because they illustrate with crystal-clarity (no pun intended) the glaring problems this book had, things that I not being Asian, may have missed or been unaware of.

The big problem here--at least to me-- is the publishing industry itself is still so lily-white that those of us actively seeking books featuring non-white lead characters and/or non-Eurocentric settings have to wade through endless dreck just to find one novel that suits the bill. Yes there are websites and othersuch, but just try going to your local Barnes and Noble to find fantasy books written by Valjeanne Jeffers, Charles Saunders or other black sci-fi/fantasy authors. Even the Grande Dame of speculative fiction, Octavia Butler, is shelved in the African American section right alsongside "The Rapper Who Was A Thug And Met The Stripper Baby Mama". She's NOT shelved in Sci-Fi where she actually belongs!

The thing is this: authors of color have a tough time getting their books out with the traditional route of New York publishing. Unless you're giving them "ghetto fabulous", "born in the Barrio" or "Joy Luck" club clones, they're really not interested (unless you happen to be white). A smaller publisher will take a chance on these books but they don't have the big bucks for advertising and purchasing prime endcap space in brick and mortar stores.

I do find it ironic how Alison Goodman's Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is lauded by so many who disliked this book as an example of Asian-themed fantasy done right. Sorry but my biggest issue was Goodman left Eona's ethnicity so oblique that I never knew what she was and that seemed to be done on purpose so that "speshul white girls" would be able to relate better to her, since they seem to have such a hard time "relating" to anything that doesn't look like them (though they can relate to sparkly vampires just fine).

The industry simply needs to be dragged screaming and kicking into the 21st century.

Again, thanks much for the review. You've given me a lot to consider. Won't change my mind on my enjoyment of the book though *grin*.


message 34: by Krystle (last edited Nov 01, 2012 04:45PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Krystle TheFountainPenDiva wrote: "As a black woman I enjoyed Stormdancer, but I understand the issues a person of Asian descent would have with it. I loved reading the two and one-star reviews because they illustrate with crystal-c..."

Yes, that is true. It is such a terrible crime and problem with the publishing industry that there aren't many authentic poc authors publishing books about poc, or even poc characters being portrayed respectfully in books and that's such a shame as it speaks volumes about the inherent problems of racism and white privilege in the publishing world as well as society.

Actually, reading Eon/Eona the settings and her mannerisms, and her dress and style of speech are very much in line with Chinese culture/mythology. They were obvious to pick up from the start. For me, it was easy to recognize and relate to her character as whole as well as the societal restrictions, taboo, and fantasy elements she implemented into her book.

Speaking of books with non-white main characters, plus non-white setting (more of an alternate history one), and romance with a non-white character, have you heard of Cold Magic? I really loved it! The first book is rather slow in the beginning with lots of things to take in but it gets so awesome later and the second book is just fabulous! Don't forget the books by N.K. Jemison. They aren't YA though, as I don't know your preferred category/genre of interest.

And, it's all right if you like the book. That's why people have different tastes. Heh.


TheFountainPenDiva Thanks for your response and yes, I loved Cold Fire! True about Eona from that aspect, but the issue I had was Goodman described the peripheral characters, skin color and all, but it seemed Eona herself was left a blank slate. And N.K. Jemison rocks!


missART Maya wrote: "Alli wrote: "But my secret wish is for it to be picked up by an animation studio in Japan so they can revise it appropriately, and because it read like an anime. "

Actually, you might be intereste..."


Oh sweet!! Thank you for the recommendation! It sounds right up my alley! :)


message 37: by Dara (last edited Dec 06, 2012 06:30AM) (new) - added it

Dara TheFountainPenDiva wrote: "As a black woman I enjoyed Stormdancer, but I understand the issues a person of Asian descent would have with it. I loved reading the two and one-star reviews because they illustrate with crystal-c..."

I think some of what you say is spot on but other parts are generalizations. I think more of us "white girls" want to read different cultures but the publishers think we don't. They overgeneralize the group. I think young white girls of today will read about a character who isn't their cultural background--it's not the skin color they won't identify with. If they can identify with the character's journey, the color of the skin makes no difference.

I promise, we aren't all like you think ;) The error is on the publishers' side. Yes, there are some girls and women who won't read anything but their cultural background, or just the "sparkly vampires" (which I cannot stand myself) but there are a great many others--the true readers--who will be more than willing to read a story with a character of different background than themselves.


message 38: by Dara (last edited Dec 06, 2012 06:36AM) (new) - added it

Dara Also after reading these reviews, I hesitate about picking the book up. Sigh. Why can't proper research be done? I think that's why I stopped writing recently, because I got overwhelmed by the research and I'm scared of misrepresentation of a culture that isn't my own. I wish other authors would be more careful in this sense. Perhaps then we may actually get a decent book.


Nobonita WoW.I never thought of it that way.I'm no native Japanese but I totally understand how you feel.I live in Bangladesh,it's a country in the Indian subcontinent and shares many of its cultures.So I get the same feeling when I read YA novels which are set in India.Some of it just feels so fake.But unless you're a native you don't really feel the fakeness.I felt a bit like that when I read The Lost Girl but since I liked everything else about the book I dismissed it.


Kate (Nomalicious Reads) Great review! I'm only up to page 97 of Stormdancer so far, I was a bit wary to start it even thought most everyone I know has it down as a five star book!

I'm glad I found your review, you've listed pretty much everything I'm having a problem with!

I study Japanese language and history at university and I think that if I didn't I may not have noticed all the misuse of the language and history! It's only the beginning and is driving me insane, let alone the massive descriptions that go for pages!

The bath scene you mentioned with boys peeping, sounds so much like an anime it makes me cringe.

I think I'm going to have to take breaks from reading it. It's such a shame too, if it was researched more thoroughly it could have been amazing! Maybe it will grow on me though...

Really glad to know I wasn't the only one who had trouble with this book! Thanks for the review!


message 41: by Jenna (new) - rated it 1 star

Jenna I couldn't even get as far as you did. But after reading some reviews, I'd have to say the book felt like a very long fanfiction, in which Japanese phrases were scattered in for "authenticity"....


message 42: by Patrick (new)

Patrick I think this review was a lot better than the others.


message 43: by Alex (new) - rated it 4 stars

Alex This was a very interesting review. I totally agree that more


message 44: by Tammy K. (new)

Tammy K. A thorough and helpful review. Thanks


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