Gregory Soderberg's Reviews > The Sacred Meal: The Ancient Practices Series

The Sacred Meal by Nora Gallagher
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
2242510
's review
Apr 05, 2011

liked it
bookshelves: liturgy
Read in February, 2011

I found Gallagher's book simultaneously illuminating and infuriating. To start on a positive note, Gallagher definitely has a gift for writing. I'm used to reading fat books by scholars on this subject, but Gallagher brings a lot of wit and earthy wisdom to this topic. And, I'll certainly agree that the scholars have muddied the waters quite a bit. Jesus told us to do something really simple, but we've managed to fragment this sacrament of unity into a hundred thorny questions. Gallagher's catchy metaphors appropriately turn our attention away from whatever might be going on "inside" the bread, and she exhorts us to remember that "we" are the Body of Christ, when we gather as the Church. When we take communion, she exhorts us to "Look around you," something I've said when I've administered communion. Don't try to conjure up some deep, mystical experience--just look around at all other messed up people that God is in the process of healing. Gallagher has many wonderful stories about her experiences with partaking, and administering, communion--stories about real people being transformed by ancient rite. She helps us to look at this "ancient practice" from lots of new angles, and I think much of what she says is spot on and quite helpful.

But ... there were a few parts which made me gag a little. I think Gallagher is far too quick to buy into the neo-liberal reading of Jesus which highlights Jesus' supposed critique of "empire." Now, I freely confess that we should do more to care for the poor. I confess that our government is not righteous. I acknowledge that there are more than a few unsettling analogies between America hegemony and the pagan Roman Empire. But, I'm just not convinced that this is the right way to read the Jesus narratives. However, I will agree enthusiastically with one of Gallagher's conclusions: "So part of waiting in Communion is examining what we did last week to find the kingdom of heaven in our midst and to help others find it" (pg. 37).

A quibble--I didn't really buy her imaginative reconstruction of Jesus' encounter with the Canaanite woman (Matt. 15:21-28). I find Kenneth Bailey's interpretation much more convincing (see Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes, ch. 16).

Lastly, I believe Gallagher goes too far in her desire to be inclusive and welcoming. She writes: "Communion is so important to me that I don't think there should be rules about who can take it and who cannot" (pg. 88). Now, I fully applaud the motive here. I'm trying to write a dissertation on some of the reasons why churches should celebrate the Supper more often. It's important to me. But not more important than the Word of God. Gallagher doesn't want to create "rules" about who can, and who can't, take Communion (pg. 89). The only problem is that the Apostle Paul lays down some pretty tough rules in 1 Cor. 11:27-32. Perhaps Gallagher has some exegetical reasons for why Paul isn't setting up some sort of "fence" around the Table. If so, it would have been nice to have those reasons summarized. She also appears to drive off the cliff of tolerance when she writes: "Thieves are welcome here, and embezzlers; so are murderers and prostitutes and sex abusers and those who have been or are abused ... Everyone." (pg. 92). Now, I agree that no sin should keep us away from the Table, but I would add that no sin we "repent" of, should keep us away. What about 1 Cor. 5:11? When Jesus refused to condone the stoning of the woman caught in adultery, he did not just dismiss her sin. He commanded her, "Go, and from now on sin no more." (Jn. 8:11). The Eucharist is medicine for sick souls, and repentance (the process of turning away from sin) must be part of how approach the Table (Ro. 6:22).

I'm thankful to Gallagher for writing this book, and for forcing us to re-think a ritual that so many of us take for granted.

flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Sacred Meal.
Sign In »

No comments have been added yet.