Blaine's Reviews > Duck!

Duck! by Kim Dare
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Jan 19, 11

bookshelves: m-m, 2011, bdsm
Read in January, 2011

** spoiler alert ** The premise drew me in. And I liked it :)
Yes, the story is a bit one sided, only exploring the sub/dom relationship, making the characters seem somewhat one dimensional, but somehow I didn't mind it.
I liked Ori and Frederick and their dynamic. Ori seemed terribly naive and innocent, but he knew who/what he was. No, not his avian type/race, but who *he* was. His needs, his wants were so simple, it was heartbreaking at times. It was an interesting way of portraying a submissive that I had not read before.
Frederick seemed a bit more distant, but it was clear that he too was very comfortable in his skin ... apart from when Ori didn't turn out to be what had been through he was. (he's not the ugly little duckling for nothing)

I have to admit I cried all through their separation, instigated mostly by Frederick, because he didn't think a swan would want to be his submissive (or anyone's for that matter).

Two points that kept me from giving this a 5 star rating:
- It jarred me that Hamilton (who had put Ori into an abusive position at his club) was the one with all the understanding in the end. A man with such sound reasoning would never allow his club to degrade as he had done (at least, I don't think so)

- The bigger issue for me was the incessant use of titles and the fact that the main character was only referred to by his last name, even in scenes in his own pov. That just doesn't gel for me and comes across to me as an oversight and laziness. I know Frederick Raynard is a master and a hawk, he knows it, but I doubt sincerely if he would ever *think* of himself that way. He may prefer to being called Raynard, and thus think of himself that way, but since no reason or hint to that was given in the story, I don't buy it.

A sidenote:
Like many others, I would have loved to know more about the avian world. All those birds, ranks, types seemed interesting (though, the abuse, not so much)


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Comments (showing 1-7 of 7) (7 new)

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J. Rosemary Moss Good point about Hamilton. I think we needed to see some serious character growth for him to turn out to be so understanding!


Steelwhisper Referring to someone by last name only is quite British an attitude.


Blaine Steelwhisper wrote: "Referring to someone by last name only is quite British an attitude."

That only excuses the use of it in dialogue... not in scenes from his own pov. Whether British or not, people normally don't refer to themselves by their last names.

Also... that was part of a bigger issue I had with the naming.


Steelwhisper Blaine wrote: "That only excuses the use of it in dialogue... not in scenes from his own pov. Whether British or not, pe..."

Heh. I would write that exactly the same way. Indeed, I commented because I am just now editing something here that is written exactly in that manner and I'd never think twice about this.

Which scenes do you mean exactly?


message 5: by Blaine (last edited Feb 07, 2013 02:38AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Blaine Steelwhisper wrote: "Blaine wrote: "That only excuses the use of it in dialogue... not in scenes from his own pov. Whether British or not, pe..."

Heh. I would write that exactly the same way. Indeed, I commented becau..."


Err... I read the book two years ago... so, I have no idea how to answer that, but it was things like 'Raynard looked at blahblah' and such.

(It reminds me very much of buffy/HP fanfic where Giles and Snape would be written from their pov and you'd read things like 'Giles hoped Buffy wouldn't be too late' and 'Snape couldn't believe Harry passed the test'

It bothers me. People don't think of themselves by their last name, unless to scold themself or have a bloody good reason to prefer their last name over their first. If no reason is given, I don't buy it.


Steelwhisper I swear I'm not expressly being obtuse here, nor argumentative :) Really. I just want to understand this point... The book is written in 3rd POV, distanced even, not in 1st POV. So how can this (taken directly from the book)

As Raynard made his way into an even darker gloom than existed in the main part of the house, he heard Ori descending a few steps behind him.

be in any way unusual? That's normal narrative to me. It's not the character thinking about himself, as it's not 1st POV. That indeed would be strange, but this? Totally common, no?


Blaine Steelwhisper wrote: "I swear I'm not expressly being obtuse here, nor argumentative :) Really. I just want to understand this point... The book is written in 3rd POV, distanced even, not in 1st POV. So how can this (ta..."

Not taken as such.

First, though, comparing it to 1st POV is senseless, since the sentence would then become:

As I made my way into an even darker gloom than existed in the mian part of the house, I heard Ori descending a few steps behind me.

No name used at all.

I also don't think it has anything to do with it being distanced 3rd.

It's all about: What does Frederick Raynard call himself? Who does he think he is when he looks into the mirror? Frederick or Raynard.

And since there was no reason given for readers to think he doesn't see himself as Frederick but Raynard, I had trouble believing it.

For me, the sentence would have made more sense if it was writting like this:

As Frederick made his way into an even darker gloom than existed in the main part of the house, he heard Ori descending a few steps behind him.

It doesn't matter if the character is actively thinking about himself, it's still his action, his pov, so, it still reflects who he is.


As for it being unnusual. You feel it's common, so maybe we read very different books. I've read very few books in 3rd person (I'm not counting omniscient in this - or fanfic since I already mentioned the Giles/Snape examples) where a main character's last name is used throughout the book in scenes from the main character's pov.

And it's only Frederick Raynard's pov. Ori Jones' pov is not written from his last name at all.


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