Lydia Presley's Reviews > Anne of the Island

Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery
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Jan 14, 11

bookshelves: 2011, childhood, favorites, fiction
Read from January 11 to 14, 2011

This is my favorite book of the Anne of Green Gables series (well, one of two favorites). The story held in the pages of Anne of the Island is one filled with the growing pains of youth, the losing of dreams, replaced by the gaining of new dreams, the making of new friends, saying goodbye to old and life continuing it's everlasting journey of passing us by.

Although the times were different, much of what L.M. Montgomery wrote of Anne's experience at college is still the same today. It's a time for discovering yourself, of getting to know who you are. And for Anne, who's mind is "constantly changing" so she's having to "reacquaint herself" with it (one of my favorite quotes in the book), college is everything I remember it being for me as well.

I think one of the reasons I love Anne so much is because she has such a perfect, wonderful appreciation for home. Sure, she sees it through rose-tinted glasses, but I don't think that's a bad thing. I think we all long to have that place in our minds, that home filled with memories and the ghosts of our youth. Remembering mine helps to steady me when things get rough, but also has such a bittersweet taste to it - and that's what Anne of the Island captures so well.

Ruby Gillis, Gilbert Blythe, Patty's Place, Diana (Barry) Wright, the births of new characters, the deaths of some old favorites, all happen in this story and it's very much a turning point. The ending of something special and the beginning of something new and exciting.
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Quotes Lydia Liked

L.M. Montgomery
“she was richer in those dreams than in realities; for things seen pass away, but the things that are unseen are eternal.”
L.M. Montgomery, Anne of the Island


Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

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message 1: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg it's my favorite of the series too. I have to say, despite LM Montgomery being from another 'time'... the A.O.G.G. books are still the best 'young woman' books I can think of. They're honest, from the heart, and entirely inspiring.


Lydia Presley Meg wrote: "it's my favorite of the series too. I have to say, despite LM Montgomery being from another 'time'... the A.O.G.G. books are still the best 'young woman' books I can think of. They're honest, from ..."

Completely agree. Anne, despite being from another time, really resonated with me as a girl. Such beautiful books!


message 3: by Meg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Meg the thing I *love* about the books, is that they are first and foremost about being yourself, finding your way in the world, and fulfilling your dreams. The romance between Anne and Gilbert is just icing on the cake... Gilbert doesn't make or break who Anne is, and in the end, he is just the person for her, because they've developed independently as well as together. I feel like a lot of YA novels (and I still read them, but recognize it) put 'finding a boyfriend' or the 'romantic story' on par if not above true personal development. Truly one of the best love stories of all time. Both self-love and romantic. =) Glad to see someone else appreciates them for that too!


Lydia Presley Meg wrote: "the thing I *love* about the books, is that they are first and foremost about being yourself, finding your way in the world, and fulfilling your dreams. The romance between Anne and Gilbert is just..."

Definitely! And Gilbert isn't a creep who invades Anne's space or makes her into something she isn't, and Anne respects herself enough not to bend toward popular opinion and figure out who she is before discovering she loves him.

Here's also what I love: I love that Anne struggles with change, but also accepts in it a wistful way. She cherishes her family, her home and her life growing up and has many of the same fears we all do as we grow up.


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