Chris's Reviews > Side Jobs: Stories From the Dresden Files

Side Jobs by Jim Butcher
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Jan 06, 11

really liked it
bookshelves: fantasy, mystery, wizardry, short-stories
Read in January, 2011

"Hell's Bells" count: 14

There's a reason that clichés become clichés. That's because, no matter how much we may hate them, they concisely describe some feature of human existence that is common to us all. The reason everyone uses them is because they're just so... right, and there's really no need for us to come up with something else. It's like saying, "Yes, I could use a screwdriver to put together my new IKEA desk, but everyone does that. I'm going to invent my own, completely new tool instead." So we use clichés, no matter how much we don't want to, because there's no reason not to.

Having said that: Reading this collection of Dresden Files stories is like visiting with an old friend. One of those people you've known for ages, never get to see often enough, and always know you'll spend a good time with. From the moment you start reading, you know where you are, you know who you're dealing with, and you're ready to jump right into the story without a whole lot of character building, exposition, and the nuisance of trying to decide if this is something you'll like to read. If you're picking up Side Jobs, odds are that you already know The Dresden Files, and odds are that you'll really enjoy these stories.

Most of them have been published before, in one form or another, but if you don't follow the various anthologies that are put out from time to time, these'll be new to you. They're not especially necessary to understand the overall series plot, but they do help to flesh out some characters and ideas that have already been presented – and hand us a few new ones as well..

The first story, "A Restoration of Faith," is a little rough, as Butcher himself admits. In the introduction to the story, he tells us that it was written when he was still in school, before he had really built up his writing chops and figured out his voice. And it does show, but in a kind of amusing way. As if, to continue on with our cliché of the day, you got to see the high school photos and videos of a friend you've only known in adulthood. It's a little awkward and a bit weird, but you can see the person he would one day become. In the same way, we get a glimpse of the young Harry Dresden, just getting his start as a private investigator. Working with Ragged Angel Investigations to get his license, Harry finds himself in one of his classic intractable positions: find a little girl whose parents don't particularly want her found. To make it more fun, she doesn't really want to be found either.

The story looks at what Harry does and why he does it, and how no matter how dark the world gets, he sees himself as a person born to hold a light in the darkness. He saves the girl, of course, with his classic nick-of-time timing, and the story ends with the introduction of Karrin Murphy and a rather punny ending. It's not really the Harry Dresden that we know, but we can see the Harry Dresden that he will become.

The other stories are good fun, too. In "It's My Birthday, Too," a story written for an anthology with a birthday theme, Harry sees the worlds of fantasy and reality collide. Violently, as usual. His brother Thomas has a birthday, and Harry has so few opportunities to do "normal" things - like celebrate birthdays - that he's determined to see that his brother gets his present. He tracks Thomas down to a shopping mall which, after hours, plays host to a LARP club. For those of you not in the know, LARP is Live-Action Role-Playing, wherein people like I was a decade ago dress up in costumes and pretend to be vampires and werewolves and wizards and things. When done well, it's good fun, and it's a great way to put on another personality for a few hours. Unfortunately for this group, their session gets interrupted by some real vampires. Drulinda, of the Black Court, is out for some social revenge against her former peers, and she's willing to kill everyone she finds in order to get it. Harry and Thomas work to bring her down, of course, while also bringing the rest of the mall down at the same time.

In "Day Off," Harry tries to take a little bit of time for himself. With no cases to work, no calls from the Chicago police, and no official duties with the White Council, he is intent on having just one day to be somewhat normal - sleep late, go out with a girl, that kind of thing. Of course, things don't work out that way, because he's Harry Dresden. Instead, he ends up with a group of wannabe wizards who think they can take him on, a couple of bespelled, amorous werewolves, and an apprentice who is only moments away from blowing herself up. It's good fun, and reminiscent of Dante in Clerks, who laments that he's not even supposed to be there.

"The Warrior" is, in many ways, a response to the readers who thought that Michael Carpenter got kind of a raw deal at the end of Small Favor. Michael had been a Knight of the Cross, a literal warrior of God, who had helped Harry fight the forces of evil many, many times. He's very different from Harry in many ways, but their differences work well together. What's more, Michael is a genuinely good man, of the Atticus Finch variety. He is honest, dedicated, and devoted to his friends, his family and his duty. That's why, when he was nearly killed at the end of Small Favor and forced to give up his position as a Knight, a lot of readers were upset.

Why? Well, because horrible things aren't supposed to happen to people as good as Michael, and yet they had. What's more, without his strength and his sword, it was hard to see how he could continue the work that he so obviously loved. This story, then, is all about how the battle to make the world a better place isn't always about the big fights and battles against entities of indescribable evil. It's also about small gestures, about stopping to talk to someone when no one else will. It's about a word or a gesture or a joke, and the way that these little things can have huge effects later. Michael may not be swinging a sword around anymore, but we know that he is still part of the fight.

Two stories that really stood out were "Backup" and "Aftermath," mainly because they were told from the point of view of someone who wasn't Harry Dresden. In "Backup," we get a story told by his brother, Thomas. A vampire of the White Court, Thomas feeds off emotion, rather than blood. This doesn't make him any less dangerous, of course. More dangerous, actually, in that so many of his potential victims give themselves to him willingly. but Thomas is trying his best to stay on the side of Good. Through his eyes, we not only get to see Harry from a new point of view, but we also get to see a lot more of a world that Harry never gets to see. Because of who he is, Harry will never really get a good look at the inner workings of the White Court and the Oblivion War – a concept that is fascinating and frustrating, because we know that Harry can never get involved in it. By telling a story through Thomas, Butcher expands the universe of The Dresden Files and makes it even more interesting.

The other non-Harry story is "Aftermath," which takes place after the most recent novel, Changes. Told from the point of view of Harry's oldest friend, Karrin Murphy, it's a look at what's happened in Chicago in the hours after Harry's disappearance (and presumed death). Without him (and without the now-destroyed Red Court of vampires), there is a huge power vacuum just waiting to be filled. Whether it's the mafia or mermen, the absence of Harry Dresden is an opportunity for many. Murphy gets involved in the hunt for special people, anyone with a trace of magical nature, who are to be used for their power. Without Harry to rely on, she has to use her own knowledge and resources to save her friends. At the same time, she has to face the reality that Harry is gone, maybe dead, and that is more terrifying than all the monsters that might try to take over the city.

It's a great collection of tales, one that's quick to get through. If you're just itching for the new book to come out, this should hold you over for a little while.

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Harry Dresden. Saving the world, one act of random destruction at a time."
- Jim Butcher, "The Warrior"
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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message 1: by Sho (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sho Thanks for a great review! Exactly! I had to laugh about the "Hell's Bells" counts. Wow he said it that many times? I felt exatly the same way after I read the Aftermath. Thank god for Murphy. I was very happy to read something from her point of view. I tweeted the author I just loved the audible book and he tweeted back saying it's all thanks to James Marsters!
LOL


Chris Thanks! Yeah, Marsters does a fantastic job on those audiobooks. Well worth the investment.


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