Joshua's Reviews > Melmoth the Wanderer

Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Robert Maturin
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Jan 03, 2011

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Read from October 16 to November 19, 2011 — I own a copy , read count: 1

While parts of this were very interesting, it had one too many points that just dragged the reader down into the deep, dark depths of boredom. Also, a good chunk of it was just anti-Catholic propaganda, and while I'm not Catholic, I don't care for propaganda in general--unless, of course, it's a good read. Granted, the premise was very good, and the story of Immalee was enthralling, not to mention the actual story; but there was one too many stories within a story within a story. It became frustrating. Some scholars think it was never intended to be a novel, but a collection of stories with an interconnecting theme. Perhaps it would've been better that way. We'll never know. All I know is, the story of Moncada should've been half the length it was. I mean, how many times can one read a description of the loneliness and monotony of a monastery without it becoming a chore? The answer to that riddle is this: it's boring the first time.
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Reading Progress

10/17 page 71
10.0%
10/29 page 243
35.0% 2 comments
01/19 marked as: read
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Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

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message 1: by Richard (new)

Richard I've always been curious about this one. Obviously you liked it enough to become a fan of the author. Looking forward to future updates/review.


Joshua It's good, but he tends to get gaudy. I don't skip parts of books, but I've been tempted with this one. When it's interesting, it's captivating; but when it's boring, it's deathly boring.


message 3: by Bruce (new)

Bruce Thank-you for helping me avoid reading it. Of course, there's the fact that Oscar Wilde named himself Sebastion Melmoth when in exile in Paris. Apparently he thought the novel noteworthy in some respect. But perhaps just the name of the protagonist.


Joshua Bruce wrote: "Thank-you for helping me avoid reading it. Of course, there's the fact that Oscar Wilde named himself Sebastion Melmoth when in exile in Paris. Apparently he thought the novel noteworthy in some ..."

There were parts that I thought were fantastic, and they really gripped me. Still, I wouldn't recommend it. I'd read The Monk or some Le Fanu instead, if you haven't. Much better Gothic writing.


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