Mike's Reviews > Welcome to the Homeland: A Journey to the Rural Heart of America's Conservative Revolution

Welcome to the Homeland by Brian Mann
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's review
Dec 18, 2010

really liked it
bookshelves: contemp-us-politics, non-fiction, reportage, rural-life, small-town-usa, us-politics, us-socioeco, z-read-in-2010, the-2000s-i-e-2000-2009
Read from December 12 to 18, 2010

This is a very good book. The most important argument here is the same one that Sanford Levinson made in his excellent book "Our Undemocratic Constitution," which is that our country's outdated constitution guarantees that Senate and presidential elections in the United States will always be extremely undemocratic affairs where 20% of the country's population can wield almost 60% of the political power and can thereby enact laws and policies that are not supported by 80% of the U.S. electorate.

This book also eloquently rebuts some smug and unproven assertions that Thomas Frank made in his influential book "What's the Matter with Kansas," mostly to the effect that rural voters have not been hoodwinked into voting against their own economic interests as Frank asserts--they understand their economic interests much better than Frank gives them credit for, but they either put their biblical concerns above those, or laugh all the way to the bank when they collect the pork-barrel largesse that comes their way as payment for their loyalty to the less popularly elected but more politically powerful Republican party.

Mann uses interviews with real-life rural "homelanders" to put a human face on the 20% of our population that he calls homelanders in order to make them more understandable to us "metros," and he succeeds.
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