Michelle's Reviews > The Remarkable Soul of a Woman

The Remarkable Soul of a Woman by Dieter F. Uchtdorf
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Dec 03, 10

Read in December, 2010

It was a bit surprising to see all the other amazing ratings of this book.

I think the book itself is beautiful. Whoever worked on the design was brilliant (except for that one picture split between two pages that looks kind of sloppy). But I found so many things in the text that bothered my feminist self. So many of the roles assumed to be roles of women are assigned roles, though the book makes them sound like they are inherent: cooking, cleaning teenagers' rooms, singing, drawing. I don't deny that those are good things (except for the cleaning part, teenagers should be doing their own cleaning!), but I do feel like the language and roles used are ones that would never be used in a talk to men. Women are to build up God's kingdom by aiming to make someone smile, men are to build it up so they can build up their own which they will share with the women (who cook and clean for them). Sounds great.

Sorry to be so cynical. I agree that service is great. I agree that we women have an important work. So much culture and generational ideology showed up in this work that I was just a bit disappointed.
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Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

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Heatherterrybell I didn't see it in this way. I saw it as seeing our potential, no matter what it is.


Jamie Cottle I think president ukdorf has amazing respect for women, of you were to ever listen to any of the apostles speak you would only hear them say how much respect they have for women.


Michelle Jamie wrote: "I think president ukdorf has amazing respect for women, of you were to ever listen to any of the apostles speak you would only hear them say how much respect they have for women."

I think President Uchtdorf is great, and I like that he always tells stories in his talks to make them more personal. Sometimes putting women on too high of a pedestal is a way of belittling, whether the person doing so knows that or not, by limiting them from reaching their potential.


message 4: by Kristen (new)

Kristen Never apologize for disliking a book or for being 'cynical'. I'm surprised you even gave it 2 stars. From the sounds of it, I'd give it 0 stars.


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