BAYA Librarian's Reviews > Worldshaker

Worldshaker by Richard Harland
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Nov 30, 10

bookshelves: science-fiction, romance, middle-school

Worldshaker is a Romeo and Juliet love story set in steam-punk world where “civilized” people live on massive steam powered vessels. Colbert Porpentine is the Romeo of this tale and also the grandson of the supreme commander of the Worldshaker dreadnought. Col as it turns out, has been chosen to succeed his grandfather as supreme commander of Worldshaker. However, an encounter with a Filthy (or lower class) girl causes Colbert to question his life on the Worldshaker. The Filthy girl Riff (or Juliet) is from the lower decks or the Below, where life is hard and only the quick and strong survive. Fortunately for Riff she is both, and also a leader of the revolutionary council. This council’s sole purpose is to overthrow those who live on the upper deck of the Worldshaker. Unfortunately, Riff’s status as a Filthy and her involvement in the council spells trouble for Col and ultimately sends him on a collision course with his family and the rest of the upper decks.

While Worldshaker was an interesting setting, Harland’s method of writing and storytelling were often too simplistic and outlandish to take advantage of this. In fact, these quirks resulted in characters that were stereotypical and often devoid of complexity. The simplicity of the writing and fact that the most of the outlandish behavior were from adults, gives the impression that Harland is aiming for a less mature audience; possibly teens in the 10-13 years-old age range. While Harland develops and interesting setting within Worldshaker his characters and writing style does not seem to be able to capitalize on a world rich with potential.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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William How? that book was amazing!!


message 2: by Anne (new)

Anne I actually agree, based on the subject and the aims - I found the writing style way too simplistic to befit the setting.


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