Margaux's Reviews > This Lullaby

This Lullaby by Sarah Dessen
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Nov 17, 10

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Quotes Margaux Liked

Sarah Dessen
“Love is needing someone. Love is putting up with someone's bad qualities because they somehow complete you.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“You know, when it works, love is pretty amazing. It's not overrated. There's a reason for all those songs.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“I just thought to my self, all of a sudden, that we had something in common. A natural chemistry, if you will. And I had a feeling that something big was going to happen. To both of us. That we were, in fact, meant to be together.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“This Lullaby is only a few words, a simple run of chords, quiet here in this spare room, but you can hear it, hear it, wherever you may go, even if I let you down, this lullaby plays on...”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“Remy: Did you really believe, that first day, that we were meant to be together?

Dexter: You're here, aren't you?”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“I meant what I said to you. I wasn't playing some kind of summer game. Everything I said was true, from the first day. EVERY GODDAMN WORD.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“Are those the only options? Nothing or forever?”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“That's what this has been all about for you, correct? Make it clear. That you and me--it was nothing more that you'll have with Spinnerbait boy, or the guy after that, or the guy after that. Right?"
"Yeah, I said, shrugging. "You're right."
He just stood there, looking at me, as if I had actually changed before his eyes. But this was the girl I'd been all along. I'd just hidden her well.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“Plastic ware," he said slowly, "like knives and forks and spoons?"
I brushed a bit of dirt off the back of my car—was that a scratch?—and said casually,
"Yeah, I guess.Just the basics, you know."
"Did you need plastic ware?" he asked.
I shrugged.
"Because," he went on, and I fought the urge to squirm, "it's so funny, because I need
plastic ware. Badly."
"Can we go inside, please?" I asked, slamming the trunk shut. "It's hot out here."
He looked at the bag again, then at me. And then, slowly, the smile I knew and
dreaded crept across his
face. "You bought me plastic ware," he said. "Didn't you?'
"No," I growled, picking at my license plate.
"You did!" he hooted, laughing out loud. "You bought me some forks. And knives.
And spoons.
Because—"
"No," I said loudly.
"—you love me!" He grinned, as if he'd solved the puzzler for all time, as I felt a flush
creep across my
face. Stupid Lissa. I could have killed her.
"It was on sale," I told him again, as if this was some kind of an excuse.
"You love me," he said simply, taking the bag and adding it to the others.
"Only seven bucks," I added, but he was already walking away, so sure of himself. "It
was on clearance,
for God's sake."
"Love me," he called out over his shoulder, in a singsong voice. "You. Love. Me.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“But you, fine sir." John Miller clapped Dexter on the shoulder, a bit unsteadily. "You have problems of your own."
"This is true," Dexter replied, nodding.
"The women," John Miller sighed.
Dexter wiped a hand over his face, and glanced down the road. "The women. Indeed, dear squire, they perplex me as well."
"Ah, the fair Remy," John Miller said grandly, and I felt a flush run up my face. Lissa, in the front seat, put a hand to her mouth.
"The fair Remy," Dexter repeated, "did not see me as a worthwhile risk."
"Indeed."
"I am, of course, a rogue. A rapscallion. A musician. I would bring her nothing but poverty, shame, and bruised shins from my flailing limbs. She is the better for our parting."
John Miller pantomined stabbing himself in the heart. "Cold words, my squire."
"Huffah," Dexter agreed.
"Huffah," John Miller repeated, "Indeed.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“Oh, God," I said.
"No, it's Dexter," he replied, offering me his hand, which I ignored.
He glanced behind him, then back at me. "I'll see you soon," he said, and grinned at
me.
"Like hell," I replied,”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“See," he began, leaning back into the booth, "I was at this car dealership today, and I
saw this girl. It was an across-a-crowded-room kind of thing. A real moment, you know?"
I rolled my eyes. Chloe said, "And this would be Remy?"
"Right. Remy," he said, repeating my name with a smile. Then, as if we were happy
honeymooners
recounting our story for strangers he added, "Do you want to tell the next part?"
"No," I said flatly.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“You don't have to say it out loud. I already know why you like me.'
'You do, huh?'
'Yep.'
He wrapped his arms around my waist, pulling me closer. 'So,' I said. 'Tell me'
'It's an animal attraction,' he said simply. 'Totally chemical.'
'Hmm,' I said. 'You could be right.'
'It doesn't matter, anyway, why you like me.'
'No?'
'Nope.' His hands were in my hair now, and I was leaning in, not able to totally make out his face, but his voice was clear, close to my ear. 'Just that you do.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“But for now, I just sat there on the bed and listened to my song. The one that had been written for me by a man who knew me not at all, now sung by the one who knew me best.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“Don't you give me no rotten tomato," Dexter sang, "just 'cause to your crazy shit I
cannot relate-o.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Austin... and you. I'll be there soon.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby

Sarah Dessen
“What the hell," I said, pushing off the wall, ready to take off the head of whatever stupid salesperson had decided to get cozy with me. My elbow was still buzzing, and I could feel a hot flush creeping up my neck: bad signs. I knew my temper.
I turned my head and saw it wasn't a salesman at all. It was a guy with black curly hair, around my age, wearing a bright orange T-shirt. And for some reason he was smiling.
"Hey there," he said cheerfully. "How's it going?"
"What is your problem?" I snapped, rubbing my elbow.
"Problem?"
"You just slammed me into the wall, asshole."
He blinked. "Goodness," he said finally. "Such language."
I just looked at him. Wrong day, buddy, I thought. You caught me on the wrong day.
"The thing is," he said, as if we'd been discussing the weather or world politics, "I saw you out in the showroom. I was over by the tire display?"
I was sure I was glaring at him. But he kept talking.
"I just thought to myself, all of a sudden, that we had something in common. A natural chemistry, if you will. And I had a feeling that something big was going to happen. To both of us. That we were, in fact, meant to be together."
"You got all this," I said, clarifying, "at the tire display?"
"You didn't feel it?" he asked.
"No. I did, however, feel you slamming me into the wall," I said evenly.
"That," he said, lowering his voice and leaning closer to me, "was an accident. An oversight. Just an unfortunate result of the enthusiasm I felt knowing I was about to talk to you.”
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby


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