Pandem's Reviews > Voice of the Fire

Voice of the Fire by Alan Moore
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Mar 08, 12

Read from November 14, 2010 to March 08, 2012

As big a fan as I am of Alan Moore's comics, I thought reading his novel would be just as thrilling an experience.

It wasn't.

To be honest, I couldn't even make it through the book's first section.

The story is ambitious - telling the history of a place from pre-historic times to the present through a series of vignettes that occurred on the site - and really, it should have been a great book. But in his ambition, Alan Moore overreached with the first part of the book.

The first vignette, if a section over a hundred pages long deserves that name, is told from the viewpoint of a, well, I'm going to say "caveman" because I can't currently be arsed to look up the exact genus. That alone is difficult, but Mr. Moore felt fit somehow to make this character a mentally-challenged caveman. While I think writing from the perspective of the mentally-challenged could certainly stand to be done more in literature, doing it with a mentally-challenged caveman who heavily overuses the word "glean" made the first section such a slog that I just couldn't make it. Trying to start again later made the slog no less arduous, and I gave up again.

Alan Moore wins for making me give up on a book.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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message 1: by Luca (new)

Luca You could just skip the first story and start with the second. I´m german so the first story was very difficult for me to read that´s why i skipped it.
I doesn´t make much of a difference, you don´t have to read the book from start to finish to get an idea of what´s going on.
Like the introduction says: One can measure a circle starting anywhere.


Pandem That might be pretty good advice. . .but unfortunately, skipping a chapter is against my religion. :(

I will try, though, and may Libris forgive me. . .


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