Ed's Reviews > The Big Bang

The Big Bang by Mickey Spillane
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Nov 10, 2010

really liked it
Read from November 07 to 10, 2010

Take Mickey Spillane's tough guy P.I. Mike Hammer: love him or hate him. I favor the former. My late grandfather read him, so maybe it's a nostalgia trip for me. Who cares why? Fiction is to entertain, and Mickey/Mike deliver the goods. This caper finds Mike in the very 1960s New York City (the manuscript finished by Collins after Spillane's death) chasing dope pimps (the huge shipment of heroin is "the big bang") who want to kill him. Sometimes I got a little disoriented in the plot, but my late at night reading time may be to blame. The prose is smooth and, at times, downright stylish. Plus Mike loves all the ladies he ever meets. He's a knight errant packing a .45. Mess with him at your peril.
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Reading Progress

11/07 page 23
9.0% "Nostalgia brings me back to Mike Hammer's "rough justice". My grandfather loved them."
05/02 marked as: read
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Comments (showing 1-6 of 6) (6 new)

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message 1: by Diane (new)

Diane My gosh I haven't thought about Mike Hammer for years. I read those Mickey Spillane books like they were chocolate candy for awhile. Maybe I'll give one of them a try again.


message 2: by F.R. (new)

F.R. Can you tell where Spillane stops and Collins starts?


message 3: by Ed (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ed Collins offers an explanation in the book of the manuscript's history. But I'm not familiar enough with Collins' work to recognize his writing style. I like the early Mike Hammers the most in the series.


message 4: by Simon (new)

Simon I'd mean to read some Mickey Spillane if it wasn't for the fact that now his books are near-impossible to find in Europe. (strange considering how popular he used to be)


message 5: by Ed (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ed Simon wrote: "I'd mean to read some Mickey Spillane if it wasn't for the fact that now his books are near-impossible to find in Europe. (strange considering how popular he used to be)"

MS's paperbacks used to be found in all of the secondhand bookstores in the States. The paperbacks were reprints, for the most. I haven't checked of late, so maybe that's the case here now. Our library only carries the newer titles like this one. Thanks for the comments and your "Likes."


message 6: by Simon (new)

Simon No probs. Many American authors (in every genre) who enjoy popularity on their home turf are actually kind of unknown in Continental Europe, and that includes younger writers too.


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