Richa's Reviews > False Impression

False Impression by Jeffrey Archer
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
F_50x66
's review
Oct 25, 10

Read in October, 2010

** spoiler alert ** Full of suspense, mystery, thrill, with pinches of romance and humor, False Impression by Jeffrey Archer is definitely a book that one could waste an entire afternoon reading. This novel is exceptionally well written, the language is clear, the plot is concise, and the characters are very well developed. I would definitely recommend this book to a friend or relative for a variety of reasons.
This book takes off when a young, successful spotter is fired from her job by her boss, Bryce Fenston, the owner of Fenston Finances, whose offices are in the Twin Towers. She finds out that Fenston is an experienced con artist, and is deceiving Lady Victoria in order to possess one of the most valuable Van Gogh paintings in the world in her Impressionist collection. This takes place right before the two airplanes crash into the towers, sending the entire tower in to frenzy. Anna escapes off radar, and determined to serve justice, she forms a plan to stop Fenston and help Victoria. She leaves for England, and upon reaching, she finds out that Victoria has been murdered, and that her sister Arabella, is willing to do anything for revenge. Asking for her help, Anna travels to London, Bucharest, Tokyo, and back to New York City in order to secure the painting, make sure it does not fall into the wrong hands, and selling it to a reliable customer in order to clear Victoria’s debts. On her tail, she has Jack, a FBI agent who is investigating the connection between Fenston, the murders of high profile people, and the numerous, high-valued, Impressionist paintings in Fenston’s possession. Her other stalker is more dangerous. Olga Krantz is a low-profile killer whose orders from Fenston are to make sure Anna is murdered and to deliver the Van Gogh back to him.
First, the author’s style is very smooth, drawing the reader in. Jeffery Archer’s transitions from sentence to sentence, page to page, chapter to chapter, are seamless. There is no hesitance, no choppiness, and he manages to leave out enough information to keep the reader guessing, but not enough to confuse the reader. In addition, Archer writes in a third person, omniscient narrative voice. He is constantly switching between telling the story through the different characters, and telling the story in its entirety. As he switches between the different points of view, The reader is all-knowing when concerning the ability to know the all the characters feelings in the book. Despite the different points of view throughout the story, the actual tale is easy to follow.
The vocabulary is tough, but not impossible, and the definition can certainly be inferred through the context. However, some of the language and scenes, which includes profanity, is inappropriate for audiences who are not mature enough to handle such content. About fourteen to fifteen years old and above is an appropriate age group for this book. The author uses realistic dialogue, though the language is more sophisticated, giving a more adult vibe to the reader. It also helps convey the emotions that the characters are feeling to a greater extent.
This book would fall under the murder mystery genre. It is full of page turning suspense, hints of romance, and a sprinkle of humor. The author’s foreshadowing throughout the book reveals certain details that seem irrelevant to the situation at hand. This adds a certain air of mystery, and further entices the reader.
The plot is very carefully crafted and intricately interconnects each main character. The best way to look at it is like a complicated spider web, where every strand leads from one to the next, but until you come to the middle, you don’t know can’t see how each strand is connected to next, and how precariously each strand upholds the hold web. Similarly, Jeffrey Archer manages to move the story from one part the next, without giving clear directions to where everything leads. Every little detail falls into place by the time the reader turns the last page. Other people may find this to be distracting, and if not written correctly, it can even discourage a reader by losing their attention. However, Archer skillfully manages craft it in a way where every little situations connects with next. In addition, just like the web, even if a little part of the story is taken out, the whole balance upon which this plot sits on will collapse. For the most part, the author manages to avoid stereotypes and clichés in the form of unexpected situations, characters, and conclusions. Jeffrey Archer does, however, divert from reality. This happens to be the part where the whole fictional side of the story comes into play. Some of the impossibly dangerous situations, even though some of the saviors are very unlikely, seem less dangerous than it really is. In addition, there is inaccuracy in describing how Anna manages to take the painting from one country to the next without any trouble, despite its high profile. Despite these faults, the rest of the book’s fast action makes up for them.
The different, abundant characters are very thoroughly developed. There are multiple main characters that have significant importance on the plot of the book. Of course, the character, Anna, who the story is mainly focused on, has a very leading role, even when the story is not told through her point of view. Every little twist in the story somehow is connected with or impacts Anna’s sticky situation. Of course, she has plenty of friends to help her through tough times – her close friend and ex-love in Bucharest, her best friend and ex-coworker, her dead client’s sister, and the handsome FBI agent. In addition, she has bountiful enemies – From her overbearing, ex-boss, to a serial murderer, to the nosy, suspicious ex-coworker. These characters are what keep the story alive, what keeps it moving. Unfortunately, some of the characters do have clichés. For instance, Anne is described as a head turning, gorgeous, "slim, blonde, American," (page 197). She ends up with snagging the ultimate guy, the typical, tall, dark, handsome, secretive, stalkerish but-I’m-only-trying-to-protecting-you FBI agent, named Jack. Their blooming relationship was very predictable, from their jogs in Central Park, when they don’t know each other, to when Jack is tailing Anna, to his subsequent arrest, to Anna’s apology, and then finally, their flirty conversations as they team up to incriminate Fenston. Krantz is portrayed as some serial, emotionless, stoic killer who has the ability to skillfully killing someone without attracting attention to herself or Fenston. She is definitely one of the more important characters, and her actions really give you an insight to how cold and unfeeling she really is.
All in all, False Impression by Jeffrey Archer has been one of my most favorite books up to date. Not only has he managed to capture the perfect blend of mystery, thrill, suspense, romance with a side of humor, Archer completely holds the readers' attentions with twists, turns, ups and downs as the story progresses. The characters are the perfect puppets in this play. The plot is an impeccable, intricate maze, the vital component in this wonderfully complicated but clear cut tale. This book is a must-read, and a wonderful addition to anyone’s bookshelf.



Merged review:

Full of suspense, mystery, thrill, with pinches of romance and humor, False Impression by Jeffrey Archer is definitely a book that one could waste an entire afternoon reading. This novel is exceptionally well written, the language is clear, the plot is concise, and the characters are very well developed. I would definitely recommend this book to a friend or relative for a variety of reasons.
This book takes off when a young, successful spotter is fired from her job by her boss, Bryce Fenston, the owner of Fenston Finances, whose offices are in the Twin Towers. She finds out that Fenston is an experienced con artist, and is deceiving Lady Victoria in order to possess one of the most valuable Van Gogh paintings in the world in her Impressionist collection. This takes place right before the two airplanes crash into the towers, sending the entire tower in to frenzy. Anna escapes off radar, and determined to serve justice, she forms a plan to stop Fenston and help Victoria. She leaves for England, and upon reaching, she finds out that Victoria has been murdered, and that her sister Arabella, is willing to do anything for revenge. Asking for her help, Anna travels to London, Bucharest, Tokyo, and back to New York City in order to secure the painting, make sure it does not fall into the wrong hands, and selling it to a reliable customer in order to clear Victoria’s debts. On her tail, she has Jack, a FBI agent who is investigating the connection between Fenston, the murders of high profile people, and the numerous, high-valued, Impressionist paintings in Fenston’s possession. Her other stalker is more dangerous. Olga Krantz is a low-profile killer whose orders from Fenston are to make sure Anna is murdered and to deliver the Van Gogh back to him.
First, the author’s style is very smooth, drawing the reader in. Jeffery Archer’s transitions from sentence to sentence, page to page, chapter to chapter, are seamless. There is no hesitance, no choppiness, and he manages to leave out enough information to keep the reader guessing, but not enough to confuse the reader. In addition, Archer writes in a third person, omniscient narrative voice. He is constantly switching between telling the story through the different characters, and telling the story in its entirety. As he switches between the different points of view, The reader is all-knowing when concerning the ability to know the all the characters feelings in the book. Despite the different points of view throughout the story, the actual tale is easy to follow.
The vocabulary is tough, but not impossible, and the definition can certainly be inferred through the context. However, some of the language and scenes, which includes profanity, is inappropriate for audiences who are not mature enough to handle such content. About fourteen to fifteen years old and above is an appropriate age group for this book. The author uses realistic dialogue, though the language is more sophisticated, giving a more adult vibe to the reader. It also helps convey the emotions that the characters are feeling to a greater extent.
This book would fall under the murder mystery genre. It is full of page turning suspense, hints of romance, and a sprinkle of humor. The author’s foreshadowing throughout the book reveals certain details that seem irrelevant to the situation at hand. This adds a certain air of mystery, and further entices the reader.
The plot is very carefully crafted and intricately interconnects each main character. The best way to look at it is like a complicated spider web, where every strand leads from one to the next, but until you come to the middle, you don’t know can’t see how each strand is connected to next, and how precariously each strand upholds the hold web. Similarly, Jeffrey Archer manages to move the story from one part the next, without giving clear directions to where everything leads. Every little detail falls into place by the time the reader turns the last page. Other people may find this to be distracting, and if not written correctly, it can even discourage a reader by losing their attention. However, Archer skillfully manages craft it in a way where every little situations connects with next. In addition, just like the web, even if a little part of the story is taken out, the whole balance upon which this plot sits on will collapse. For the most part, the author manages to avoid stereotypes and clichés in the form of unexpected situations, characters, and conclusions. Jeffrey Archer does, however, divert from reality. This happens to be the part where the whole fictional side of the story comes into play. Some of the impossibly dangerous situations, even though some of the saviors are very unlikely, seem less dangerous than it really is. In addition, there is inaccuracy in describing how Anna manages to take the painting from one country to the next without any trouble, despite its high profile. Despite these faults, the rest of the book’s fast action makes up for them.
The different, abundant characters are very thoroughly developed. There are multiple main characters that have significant importance on the plot of the book. Of course, the character, Anna, who the story is mainly focused on, has a very leading role, even when the story is not told through her point of view. Every little twist in the story somehow is connected with or impacts Anna’s sticky situation. Of course, she has plenty of friends to help her through tough times – her close friend and ex-love in Bucharest, her best friend and ex-coworker, her dead client’s sister, and the handsome FBI agent. In addition, she has bountiful enemies – From her overbearing, ex-boss, to a serial murderer, to the nosy, suspicious ex-coworker. These characters are what keep the story alive, what keeps it moving. Unfortunately, some of the characters do have clichés. For instance, Anne is described as a head turning, gorgeous, "slim, blonde, American," (page 197). She ends up with snagging the ultimate guy, the typical, tall, dark, handsome, secretive, stalkerish but-I’m-only-trying-to-protecting-you FBI agent, named Jack. Their blooming relationship was very predictable, from their jogs in Central Park, when they don’t know each other, to when Jack is tailing Anna, to his subsequent arrest, to Anna’s apology, and then finally, their flirty conversations as they team up to incriminate Fenston. Krantz is portrayed as some serial, emotionless, stoic killer who has the ability to skillfully killing someone without attracting attention to herself or Fenston. She is definitely one of the more important characters, and her actions really give you an insight to how cold and unfeeling she really is.
All in all, False Impression by Jeffrey Archer has been one of my most favorite books up to date. Not only has he managed to capture the perfect blend of mystery, thrill, suspense, romance with a side of humor, Archer completely holds the readers' attentions with twists, turns, ups and downs as the story progresses. The characters are the perfect puppets in this play. The plot is an impeccable, intricate maze, the vital component in this wonderfully complicated but clear cut tale. This book is a must-read, and a wonderful addition to anyone’s bookshelf.
1 like · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read False Impression.
sign in »

No comments have been added yet.